Excel, SPSS, Minitab or R?

February 10, 2013
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(This article was originally published at Learn and Teach Statistics and Operations Research, and syndicated at StatsBlogs.)

I often hear this question: Should I use Excel to teach my class? Or should I use R? Which package is the best?

It depends on the class

The short answer is: It depends on your class. You have to ask yourself, what are the attitudes, skills and knowledge that you wish the students to gain in the course. What is it that you want them to feel and do and understand?

If the students are never likely to do any more statistics, what matters most is that they understand the elementary ideas, feel happy about what they have done, and recognise the power of statistical analysis, so they can later employ a statistician.

If the students are strong in programming, such as engineering or computer science students, then they are less likely to find the programming a barrier, and will want to explore the versatility of the package.

If they are research students and need to take the course as part of a research methods paper, then they should be taught on the package they are most likely to use in their research.

Over the years I have taught statistics using Excel, Minitab and SPSS. These days I am preparing materials for courses using iNZight, which is a specifically designed user interface with an R engine. I have dabbled in R, but never had students who are suitable to be taught using R.

Here are my pros and cons for each of these, and when are they most suitable.

Excel

I have already written somewhat about the good and bad aspects of Excel, and the evils of Excel histograms. There are many problems with statistical analysis with Excel. I am told there are parts of the analysis toolpak which are wrong, though I’ve never found them myself. There is no straight-forward way to do a hypothesis test for a mean. The data-handling capabilities of the spreadsheet are fantastic, but the toolpak cannot even deal well with missing values. The output is idiosyncratic, and not at all intuitive. There are programming quirks which should have been eliminated many years ago. For example when you click on a radio button to say where you wish the output to go, the entry box for the data is activated, rather than the one for the output. It requires elementary Visual Basic to correct this, but has never happened. Each time Excel upgrades I look for this small fix, and have repeatedly been disappointed.

So, given these shortcomings, why would you use Excel? Because it is there, because you are helping students gain other skills in spreadsheeting at the same time, because it is less daunting to use a familiar interface. These reasons may not apply to all students. Excel is the best package for first year business students for so many reasons.

PivotTables in Excel are nasty to get your head around, but once you do, they are fantastic. I resisted teaching PivotTables for some years, but I was wrong. They may well be one of the most useful things I have ever taught at university. I made my students create comparative bar charts on Excel, using Pivot-Tables. One day Helen and I will make a video about PivotTables.

Minitab

Minitab is a lovely little package, and has very nice output. Its roots as a teaching package are obvious from the user-friendly presentation of results. It has been some years since I taught with Minitab. The main reason for this is that the students are unlikely ever to have access to Minitab again, and there is a lot of extra learning required in order to make it run.

SPSS

Most of my teaching at second year undergraduate and MBA and Masters of Education level has been with SPSS. Much of the analysis for my PhD research was done on SPSS. It’s a useful package, with its own peculiarities. I really like the data-handling in terms of excluding data, transforming variables and dealing with missing values. It has a much larger suite of analysis tools, including factor analysis, discriminant analysis, clustering and multi-dimensional scaling, which I taught to second year business students and research students.  SPSS shows its origins as a suite of barely related packages, in the way it does things differently between different areas. But it’s pretty good really.

R

R is what you expect from a command-line open-source program. It is extremely versatile, and pretty daunting for an arts or business major. I can see that R is brilliant for second-level and up in statistics, preferably for students who have already mastered similar packages/languages like MatLab or Maple. It is probably also a good introduction to high-level programming for Operations Research students.

iNZight

This brings us to iNZight, which is a suite of routines using R, set in a semi-friendly user interface. It was specifically written to support the innovative New Zealand school curriculum in statistics, and has a strong emphasis on visual representation of data and results. It includes alternatives that use bootstrapping as well as traditional hypothesis testing. The time series package allows only one kind of seasonal model. I like iNZight. If I were teaching at university still, I would think very hard about using it. I certainly would use it for Time Series analysis at first year level. For high school teachers in New Zealand, there is nothing to beat it.

It has some issues. The interface is clunky and takes a long time to unzip if you have a dodgy computer (as I do). The graphics are unattractive. Sorry guys, I HATE the eyeball, and the colours don’t do it for me either. I think they need to employ a professional designer. SOON! The data has to be just right before the interface will accept it. It is a little bit buggy in a non-disastrous sort of way. It can have dimensionality/rounding issues. (I got a zero slope coefficient for a linear regression with an r of 0.07 the other day.)

But – iNZight does exactly what you want it to do, with lots of great graphics and routines to help with understanding. It is FREE. It isn’t crowded with all the extras that you don’t really need. It covers all of the New Zealand statistics curriculum, so the students need only to learn one interface.

There are other packages such as Genstat, Fathom and TinkerPlots, aimed at different purposes. My university did not have any of these, so I didn’t learn them. They may well be fantastic, but I haven’t the time to do a critique just now. Feel free to add one as a comment below!




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