The Manager’s Path (book recommendation for new managers)

May 24, 2018
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The Manager’s Path (book recommendation for new managers)

I (Bob) was visiting Matt Hoffman (of NUTS fame) at Google in California a few weeks ago, and he recommended the following book: Camille Fournier. 2017. The Manager’s Path. O’Reilly. It’s ordered from being an employee, to being a tech lead, to managing a small team, to managing teams of teams, and I stopped there. […] The post The Manager’s Path (book recommendation for new managers) appeared first on Statistical…

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Stan on TV

May 24, 2018
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For reals. Billions, Season 3, Episode 9 35:10. The post Stan on TV appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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Portrait: Jason Dykes

May 24, 2018
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Portrait: Jason Dykes

Jason Dykes is professor at City University London, where he also co-leads the giCentre. He straddles the line between cartography and visualization, publishing in both communities and combining ideas from both – which have led to crossover ideas like spatially-ordered treemaps and map lineups. Jason is also the driving force behind the Velo Club de VIS, […]

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“I admire the authors for simply admitting they made an error and stating clearly and without equivocation that their original conclusions were not substantiated.”

May 24, 2018
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David Allison writes: I hope you will consider covering this in your blog. I admire the authors for simply admitting they made an error and stating clearly and without equivocation that their original conclusions were not substantiated. More attention to the confusing effects of regression to the mean are warranted as is more praise for […] The post “I admire…

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A Comparative Review of the RKWard GUI for R

May 24, 2018
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A Comparative Review of the RKWard GUI for R

Introduction RKWard is a free and open source Graphical User Interface for the R software, one that supports beginners looking to point-and-click their way through analyses, as well as advanced programmers. You can think of it as a blend of … Continue reading →

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Context Compatibility in Data Analysis

May 24, 2018
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All data arise within a particular context and often as a result of a specific question being asked. That is all well and good until we attempt to use that same data to answer a different question within a different context. When you match an existin...

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The anthropic principle in statistics

May 23, 2018
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The anthropic principle in physics states that we can derive certain properties of the world, or even the universe, based on the knowledge of our existence. The earth can’t be too hot or too cold, there needs to be oxygen and water, etc., which in turn implies certain things about our solar system, and so […] The post The anthropic…

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David Bellos’s book on translation

May 23, 2018
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Seeing as linguistics is on the agenda, I thought I’d mention this excellent book I just finished, “Is That a Fish in Your Ear,” by David Bellos. Bellos is a translator and scholar of French literature, and in his book he covers all sorts of topics. Nothing deep, but, as a non-expert on the topic, […] The post David Bellos’s…

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A butterfly plot for comparing distributions

May 23, 2018
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A butterfly plot for comparing distributions

This article shows how to construct a butterfly plot in SAS. A butterfly plot (also called a butterfly chart) is a comparative bar chart or histogram that displays the distribution of a variable for two subpopulations. A butterfly plot for the cholesterol readings of 5,057 patients in a medical study [...] The post A butterfly plot for comparing distributions appeared…

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Visualization: Three Alternate Histories

May 22, 2018
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Visualization: Three Alternate Histories

The academic visualization community largely comes from computer science: most of the professors teach in computer science (or similar) departments, most of the students doing research are computer science students of some flavor or other. It's interesting to consider how the field might be different if visualization had emerged from a different discipline. The inspiration […]

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The statistical significance filter leads to overoptimistic expectations of replicability

May 22, 2018
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Shravan Vasishth, Daniela Mertzen, Lena Jäger, et al. write: Treating a result as publishable just because the p-value is less than 0.05 leads to overoptimistic expectations of replicability. These overoptimistic expectations arise due to Type M(agnitude) error: when underpowered studies yield significant results, effect size estimates are guaranteed to be exaggerated and noisy. These effects […] The post The statistical…

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What are they doing …. ?

May 22, 2018
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What are they doing …. ?

… and how do statistical institutions present what they do? In times of fake news and austerity measures, statistical offices are feeling more and more the urge to orientate the public about themselves and the usefulness and necessity of trustworthy statistics. But how to proceed? Public relations specialists know countless ways to get messages to […]

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What is “weight of evidence” in bureaucratese?

May 22, 2018
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Martha Smith writes: An NPR program today (Chemical Industry Insider Rolls Back Rules At EPA, http://www.npr.org/podcasts/510053/on-point-with-tom-ashbrook) led me to a NY Times article by Eric Lipton (https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/21/us/trump-epa-chemicals-regulations.html) about the same topic. I browsed te latter a bit. One quote of note: One area of contention was Dr. Beck’s insistence that the E.P.A. adopt precise definitions of terms and phrases […] The post What is…

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Top 100 Economics Blogs

May 22, 2018
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Check out the latest "Top 100 Economics Blogs" here. The blurb for No Hesitations (under "Sub-field Economic Blogs") is pretty funny, issuing a stern warning: His blog is primarily focused on statistics and econometrics, and is highly technical. T...

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Garden of forking paths – poker analogy

May 21, 2018
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[image of cats playing poker] Someone who wishes to remain anonymous writes: Just wanted to point out an analogy I noticed between the “garden of forking paths” concept as it relates to statistical significance testing and poker strategy (a game I’ve played as a hobby). A big part of constructing a winning poker strategy nowadays […] The post Garden of…

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Light entertainment: I am a pen and I object

May 21, 2018
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Light entertainment: I am a pen and I object

You've got to look out for conflicts on your dataviz! Example from Explosm courtesy of reader Chris P. Color says one thing. Face says something else. Words agree with Color. Pen objects.

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Position items in a grid

May 21, 2018
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Position items in a grid

In a recent blog post, Chris Hemedinger used a scatter plot to show the result of 100 coin tosses. Chris arranged the 100 results in a 10 x 10 grid, where the first 10 results were shown on the first row, the second 10 were shown on the second row, and so [...] The post Position items in a grid appeared first…

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Prior distributions and the Australia principle

May 20, 2018
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Prior distributions and the Australia principle

There’s an idea in philosophy called the Australia principle—I don’t know the original of this theory but here’s an example that turned up in a google search—that posits that Australia doesn’t exist; instead, they just build the parts that are needed when you visit: a little mock-up of the airport, a cityscape with a model […] The post Prior distributions…

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Regularized Prediction and Poststratification (the generalization of Mister P)

May 19, 2018
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This came up in comments recently so I thought I’d clarify the point. Mister P is MRP, multilevel regression and poststratification. The idea goes like this: 1. You want to adjust for differences between sample and population. Let y be your outcome of interest and X be your demographic and geographic variables you’d like to […] The post Regularized Prediction…

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On the interpretation of a regression model

May 18, 2018
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On the interpretation of a regression model

Yesterday, NaytaData (aka @NaytaData ) posted a nice graph on reddit, with bicycle traffic and mean air temperature, in Helsinki, Finland, per day, I found that graph interesting, so I did ask for the data (NaytaData kindly sent them to me tonight). df=read.csv("cyclistsTempHKI.csv") library(ggplot2) ggplot(df, aes(meanTemp, cyclists)) + geom_point() + geom_smooth(span = 0.3) But as mentioned by someone on twitter, the…

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Awesome data visualization tool for brain research

May 18, 2018
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Awesome data visualization tool for brain research

When I was visiting the University of Washington the other day, Ariel Rokem showed me this cool data visualization and exploration tool produced by Jason Yeatman, Adam Richie-Halford, Josh Smith, and himself. The above image gives a sense of the dashboard but the real thing is much more impressive because it’s interactive. You can rotate […] The post Awesome data…

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Le Monde puzzle [#1051]

May 17, 2018
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Le Monde puzzle [#1051]

A combinatoric Le Monde mathematical puzzle of limited size: When the only allowed move is to switch two balls from adjacent boxes, what is the minimal number of moves to return all balls in the above picture to their respective boxes? Same question with six boxes and 12 balls. The question is rather interesting to […]

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How to think about research, and research criticism, and research criticism criticism, and research criticism criticism criticism?

May 17, 2018
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Some people pointed me to this article, “Issues with data and analyses: Errors, underlying themes, and potential solutions,” by Andrew Brown, Kathryn Kaiser, and David Allison. They discuss “why focusing on errors [in science] is important,” “underlying themes of errors and their contributing factors, “the prevalence and consequences of errors,” and “how to improve conditions […] The post How to…

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