When does research have active opposition?

March 24, 2017
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When does research have active opposition?

A reporter was asking me the other day about the Brian Wansink “pizzagate” scandal. The whole thing is embarrassing for journalists and bloggers who’ve been reporting on this guy’s claims entirely uncritically for years. See here, for example. Or here and here. Or here, here, here, and here. Or here. Or here, here, here, . […] The post When does research have active opposition? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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Mortality rate trends by age, ethnicity, sex, and state (link fixed)

March 23, 2017
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Mortality rate trends by age, ethnicity, sex, and state (link fixed)

There continues to be a lot of discussion on the purported increase in mortality rates among middle-aged white people in America. Actually an increase among women and not much change among men but you don’t hear so much about this as it contradicts the “struggling white men” story that we hear so much about in […] The post Mortality rate…

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The Tidyverse Curse

March 23, 2017
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I’ve just finished a major overhaul to my widely read article, Why R is Hard to Learn. It describes the main complaints I’ve heard from the participants to my workshops, and how those complaints can often be mitigated. Here’s the only … Continue reading →

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Visualizing citation impact

March 23, 2017
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Visualizing citation impact

Michael Bales and his associates at Cornell are working on a new visual tool for citations data. This is an area that is ripe for some innovation. There is a lot of data available but it seems difficult to gain...

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Toi aussi, raconte ce que tu veux avec des graphiques

March 23, 2017
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Toi aussi, raconte ce que tu veux avec des graphiques

L’autre jour, les décodeurs publiaient sur le site du Monde un article sur l’utilisation des graphiques en base 100, Je reprends le commentaire Celui-ci indique, sans appel selon Mme Le Pen, le déclin des économies françaises, italiennes et espagnoles face à l’industrie allemande. Marine Le Pen n’hésite ainsi pas à affirmer que le déclin de la production française est lié à l’introduction de…

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Datashader is a big deal

March 22, 2017
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Datashader is a big deal

I recently got back from Strata West 2017 (where I ran a very well received workshop on R and Spark). One thing that really stood out for me at the exhibition hall was Bokeh plus datashader from Continuum Analytics. I had the privilege of having Peter Wang himself demonstrate datashader for me and answer a … Continue reading Datashader is…

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This could be a big deal: the overuse of psychotropic medications for advanced Alzheimer’s patients

March 22, 2017
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I received the following email, entitled “A research lead (potentially bigger than the opioid epidemic,” from someone who wishes to remain anonymous: My research lead is related to the use of psychotropic medications in Alzheimer’s patients. I should note that strong cautions have already been issued with respect to the use of these medications in […] The post This could…

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Data tables: Nonmatrix data structures in SAS/IML

March 22, 2017
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Data tables: Nonmatrix data structures in SAS/IML

Prior to SAS/IML 14.2, every variable in the Interactive Matrix Language (IML) represented a matrix. That changed when SAS/IML 14.2 introduced two new data structures: data tables and lists. This article gives an overview of data tables. I will blog about lists in a separate article. A matrix is a [...] The post Data tables: Nonmatrix data structures in SAS/IML…

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Sorting correlation coefficients by their magnitudes in a SAS macro

Sorting correlation coefficients by their magnitudes in a SAS macro

Theoretical Background Many statisticians and data scientists use the correlation coefficient to study the relationship between 2 variables.  For 2 random variables, and , the correlation coefficient between them is defined as their covariance scaled by the product of their standard deviations.  Algebraically, this can be expressed as . In real life, you can never […]

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Forecasting and "As-If" Discounting

March 21, 2017
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Check out the fascinating and creative new paper, "Myopia and Discounting", by Xavier Gabaix and David Laibson. From their abstract (slightly edited):We assume that perfectly patient agents estimate the value of future events by generating noisy, unbia...

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Some natural solutions to the p-value communication problem—and why they won’t work

March 21, 2017
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Blake McShane and David Gal recently wrote two articles (“Blinding us to the obvious? The effect of statistical training on the evaluation of evidence” and “Statistical significance and the dichotomization of evidence”) on the misunderstandings of p-values that are common even among supposed experts in statistics and applied social research. The key misconception has nothing […] The post Some natural…

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Your charts need the gift of purpose

March 21, 2017
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Your charts need the gift of purpose

Via Twitter, I received this chart: My readers are nailing it when it comes to finding charts that deserve close study. On Twitter, the conversation revolved around the inversion of the horizontal axis. Favorability is associated with positive numbers, and...

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Data validation with the assertr package

March 20, 2017
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Data validation with the assertr package

Version 2.0 of my data set validation package assertr hit CRAN just this weekend. It has some pretty great improvements over version 1. For those new to the package, what follows is a short and new introduction. For those who… Continue reading →

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Clarke’s Law: Any sufficiently crappy research is indistinguishable from fraud (Pizzagate edition)

March 20, 2017
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Clarke’s Law: Any sufficiently crappy research is indistinguishable from fraud (Pizzagate edition)

This recent Pizzagate post by Nick Brown reminds me of our discussion of Clarke’s Law last year. P.S. I watched a couple more episodes of Game of Thrones on the plane the other day. It was pretty good! And so I continue to think this watching GoT is more valuable than writing error-ridden papers such […] The post Clarke’s Law:…

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Discover information about SAS formats… programmatically

March 20, 2017
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Discover information about SAS formats… programmatically

SAS formats are very useful and can be used in a myriad of creative ways. For example, you can use formats to display decimal values as a fraction. However, SAS supports so many formats that it is difficult to remember details about the format syntax, such as the default field [...] The post Discover information about SAS formats... programmatically appeared…

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ML and Metrics VIII: The New Predictive Econometric Modeling

March 19, 2017
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[Click on "Machine Learning" at right for earlier "Machine Learning and Econometrics" posts.] We econometricians need -- and have always had -- cross section and time series ("micro econometrics" and "macro/financial econometrics"), causal estimation a...

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Practical Data Science with R: ACM SIGACT News Book Review and Discount!

March 19, 2017
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Practical Data Science with R: ACM SIGACT News Book Review and Discount!

Our book Practical Data Science with R has just been reviewed in Association for Computing Machinery Special Interest Group on Algorithms and Computation Theory (ACM SIGACT) News by Dr. Allan M. Miller (U.C. Berkeley)! The book is half off at Manning March 21st 2017 using the following code (please share/Tweet): Deal of the Day March … Continue reading Practical Data…

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Practical Data Science with R: ACM SIGACT News Book Review and Discount!

March 19, 2017
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Practical Data Science with R: ACM SIGACT News Book Review and Discount!

Our book Practical Data Science with R has just been reviewed in Association for Computing Machinery Special Interest Group on Algorithms and Computation Theory (ACM SIGACT) News by Dr. Allan M. Miller (U.C. Berkeley)! The book is half off at Manning form March 21st 2017 using the following code (please share/Tweet): Deal of the Day … Continue reading Practical Data…

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The Econometric Game, 2017

March 19, 2017
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The Econometric Game, 2017

This year's edition of The Econometric Game is scheduled to take place next month in Amsterdam.Specifically, between 5 and 7 April the University of Amsterdam will once again host visiting teams of econometrics students from around the world to compete...

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The U.S. Has Been At War 222 Out of 239 Years

March 19, 2017
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The U.S. Has Been At War 222 Out of 239 Years

This morning, I discovered an interesting statistic, America Has Been At War 93% of the Time – 222 Out of 239 Years – Since 1776,  i.e. the U.S. has only been at peace for less than 20 years total since its birth. I wanted to check, get a better understanding and look at other countries in the world. As always, we…

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Whassup, Pace investigators? You’re still hiding your data. C’mon dudes, loosen up. We’re getting chronic fatigue waiting for you already!

March 19, 2017
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Whassup, Pace investigators?  You’re still hiding your data.  C’mon dudes, loosen up.  We’re getting chronic fatigue waiting for you already!

James Coyne writes: For those of you who have not heard of the struggle for release of the data from the publicly funded PACE trial of adaptive pacing therapy, cognitive behaviour therapy, graded exercise therapy, and specialist medical care for chronic fatigue syndrome, you can access my [Coyne’s] initial call for release of the portion […] The post Whassup, Pace…

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“Bias” and “variance” are two ways of looking at the same thing. (“Bias” is conditional, “variance” is unconditional.)

March 18, 2017
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Someone asked me about the distinction between bias and noise and I sent him some links. Then I thought this might interest some of you too, so here it is: Here’s a recent paper on election polling where we try to be explicit about what is bias and what is variance: And here are some […] The post “Bias” and…

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“A blog post that can help an industry”

March 18, 2017
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Tim Bock writes: I understood how to address weights in statistical tests by reading Lu and Gelman (2003). Thanks. You may be disappointed to know that this knowledge allowed me to write software, which has been used to compute many billions of p-values. When I read your posts and papers on forking paths, I always […] The post “A blog…

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