What is “blogging”? Is it different from “writing”?

April 21, 2018
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Thomas Basbøll wrote: To blog is not to write in a particular style, or publish in a particular form. Rather, blogging is an experience that is structured by a particular functionality. . . . What makes it a blog is a structural coordination of the blogger and the audience. . . . Blogging, in my […] The post What is “blogging”? Is it different from “writing”? appeared first on Statistical…

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Carol Nickerson investigates an unfounded claim of “17 replications”

April 20, 2018
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Carol Nickerson sends along this report in which she carefully looks into the claim that the effect of power posing on feelings of power has replicated 17 times. Also relevant to the discussion is this post from a few months ago by Joe Simmons, Leif Nelson, and Uri Simonsohn. I am writing about this because […] The post Carol Nickerson…

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Pastagate!

April 19, 2018
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[relevant picture] In a news article, “Pasta Is Good For You, Say Scientists Funded By Big Pasta,” Stephanie Lee writes: The headlines were a fettuccine fanatic’s dream. “Eating Pasta Linked to Weight Loss in New Study,” Newsweek reported this month, racking up more than 22,500 Facebook likes, shares, and comments. The happy news also went […] The post Pastagate! appeared…

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Postdoc opportunity at AstraZeneca in Cambridge, England, in Bayesian Machine Learning using Stan!

April 19, 2018
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Here it is: Predicting drug toxicity with Bayesian machine learning models We’re currently looking for talented scientists to join our innovative academic-style Postdoc. From our centre in Cambridge, UK you’ll be in a global pharmaceutical environment, contributing to live projects right from the start. You’ll take part in a comprehensive training programme, including a focus […] The post Postdoc opportunity…

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Psychometrics corner: They want to fit a multilevel model instead of running 37 separate correlation analyses

April 19, 2018
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Anouschka Foltz writes: One of my students has some data, and there is an issue with multiple comparisons. While trying to find out how to best deal with the issue, I came across your article with Martin Lindquist, “Correlations and Multiple Comparisons in Functional Imaging: A Statistical Perspective.” And while my student’s work does not […] The post Psychometrics corner:…

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Upcoming speaking engagments

April 19, 2018
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Upcoming speaking engagments

I have a couple of public appearances coming up soon. The East Bay R Language Beginners Group: Preparing Datasets – The Ugly Truth & Some Solutions, Tuesday, May 1, 2018 at Robert Half Technologies, 1999 Harrison Street, Oakland, CA, 94612. Official May 2018 BARUG Meeting: rquery: a Query Generator for Working With SQL Data, Tuesday, … Continue reading Upcoming speaking…

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Trichotomous

April 19, 2018
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Trichotomous

Regarding this paper, Frank Harrell writes: One grammatical correction: Alvan Feinstein, the ‘father of clinical epidemiology’ at Yale, educated me about ‘trichotomy’. dichotomous = Greek dicho (two) + tomous (cut). Three = tri so the proper word would be ‘tritomous’ instead of ‘trichotomous’. Uh oh. I can’t bring myself to use the word “tritomous” as […] The post Trichotomous appeared…

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Playfulness in data visualization

April 19, 2018
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Playfulness in data visualization

The Newslab project takes aggregate data from Google's various services and finds imaginative ways to enliven the data. The Beautiful in English project makes a strong case for adding playfulness to your data visualization. The data came from Google Translate....

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Major depression, qu’est-ce que c’est?

April 19, 2018
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Attention conservation notice: 1100+ words on a speculative scientific paper, proposing yet another reformation of psychopathology. The post contains equations and amateur philosophy of science. Reading it will not make you feel better. — Lar...

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Process versus outcome productivity

April 19, 2018
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Several times over the last few weeks my hatred of Doodle polls has come up in meetings. I think the polling technology is great, but I’m still frustrated by the polls. Someone asked what I’d rather have happen and I said: “set the ...

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“Statistics: Learning from stories” (my talk in Zurich on Tues 28 Aug)

April 18, 2018
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Statistics: Learning from stories Andrew Gelman, Department of Statistics and Department of Political Science, Columbia University, New York Here is a paradox: In statistics we aim for representative samples and balanced comparisons, but stories are interesting to the extent that they are surprising and atypical. The resolution of the paradox is that stories can be […] The post “Statistics: Learning…

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You better check yo self before you wreck yo self

April 18, 2018
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You better check yo self before you wreck yo self

We (Sean Talts, Michael Betancourt, Me, Aki, and Andrew) just uploaded a paper (code available here) that outlines a framework for verifying that an algorithm for computing a posterior distribution has been implemented correctly. It is easy to use, straightforward to implement, and ready to be implemented as part of a Bayesian workflow. This type of […] The post You better…

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Using partial pooling when preparing data for machine learning applications

April 18, 2018
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Geoffrey Simmons writes: I reached out to John Mount/Nina Zumel over at Win Vector with a suggestion for their vtreat package, which automates many common challenges in preparing data for machine learning applications. The default behavior for impact coding high-cardinality variables had been a naive bayes approach, which I found to be problematic due its multi-modal output (assigning […] The post Using partial…

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They destroyed huge amounts of food again

April 18, 2018
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Kaiser Fung, founder of Principal Analytics Prep, questions whether massive food recalls are reasonable reactions to disease outbreaks.

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They destroyed huge amounts of food again

April 18, 2018
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Kaiser Fung, founder of Principal Analytics Prep, questions whether massive food recalls are reasonable reactions to disease outbreaks.

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The sweep operator: A fundamental operation in regression

April 18, 2018
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The sweep operator: A fundamental operation in regression

The sweep operator performs elementary row operations on a system of linear equations. The sweep operator enables you to build regression models by "sweeping in" or "sweeping out" particular rows of the X`X matrix. As you do so, the estimates for the regression coefficients, the error sum of squares, and [...] The post The sweep operator: A fundamental operation in…

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A Review of Qualtrics, QuestionPro, REDCap, SurveyGizmo, & SurveyMonkey

April 18, 2018
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A Review of Qualtrics, QuestionPro, REDCap, SurveyGizmo, & SurveyMonkey

 Introduction Web-based surveys offer a quick and effective way to collect data. Several companies sell software-as-a-service which makes the construction of surveys quite easy using only a web browser. At the University of Tennessee, we currently have a system-wide site … Continue reading →

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Le Monde puzzle [#1049]

April 17, 2018
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Le Monde puzzle [#1049]

An algorithmic Le Monde mathematical puzzle with a direct Alice and Bob play a game by picking alternatively one of the remaining digits between 1 and 10 and putting it in either one of two available stacks, 1 or 2. Their respective gains are the products of the piles (1 for Alice and 2 for […]

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An Upbeat Mood May Boost Your Paper’s Publicity

April 17, 2018
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Gur Huberman points to this news article, An Upbeat Mood May Boost Your Flu Shot’s Effectiveness, which states: A new study suggests that older people who are in a good mood when they get the shot have a better immune response. British researchers followed 138 people ages 65 to 85 who got the 2014-15 vaccine. […] The post An Upbeat…

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Laplace on behavioral psychology channeled through Miller and Gelman

April 17, 2018
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Kaiser Fung, founder of Principal Analytics Prep, and author of Numbersense, discusses a recent paper by Miller and Gelman about Laplace's view on cognitive illusions.

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Neyman vs the ‘Inferential’ Probabilists continued (a)

April 17, 2018
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Neyman vs the ‘Inferential’ Probabilists continued (a)

Today is Jerzy Neyman’s Birthday (April 16, 1894 – August 5, 1981).  I am posting a brief excerpt and a link to a paper of his that I hadn’t posted before: Neyman, J. (1962), ‘Two Breakthroughs in the Theory of Statistical Decision Making‘ [i] It’s chock full of ideas and arguments, but the one that interests […]

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R Tip: Use Slices

April 17, 2018
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R Tip: Use Slices

R tip: use slices. R has a very powerful array slicing ability that allows for some very slick data processing. Suppose we have a data.frame “d“, and for every row where d$n_observations < 5 we wish to “NA-out” some other columns (mark them as not yet reliably available). Using slicing techniques this can be done … Continue reading R Tip:…

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What is a Successful Data Analysis?

April 17, 2018
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Defining success in data analysis has eluded me for quite some time now. About two years ago I tried to explore this question in my Dean’s Lecture, but ultimately I think I missed the mark. In that talk I tried to identify standards (I called them ...

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