Tom Wolfe

I’m a big Tom Wolfe fan. My favorites are The Painted Word and From Bauhaus to Our House, and I have no patience for the boosters (oh, sorry, “experts”) of modern art of the all-black-painting variety or modern architecture of the can’t-find-the-front-door variety who can’t handle Wolfe’s criticism. I also enjoyed Bonfire of the Vanities, […]

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Graphs and tables, tables and graphs

Jesse Wolfhagen writes: I was surprised to see a reference to you in a Quartz opinion piece entitled “Stop making charts when a table is better”. While the piece itself makes that case that there are many kinds of charts that are simply restatements of tabular data, I was surprised that you came up as […]

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Mementos for Excursion 2 Tour II: Falsification, Pseudoscience, Induction (2.3-2.7)

Excursion 2 Tour II: Falsification, Pseudoscience, Induction* Outline of Tour. Tour II visits Popper, falsification, corroboration, Duhem’s problem (what to blame in the case of anomalies) and the demarcation of science and pseudoscience (2.3). While Popper comes up short on each, the reader is led to improve on Popper’s notions (live exhibit (v)). Central ingredients […]

“Using numbers to replace judgment”

Julian Marewski and Lutz Bornmann write: In science and beyond, numbers are omnipresent when it comes to justifying different kinds of judgments. Which scientific author, hiring committee-member, or advisory board panelist has not been confronted with page-long “publication manuals”, “assessment reports”, “evaluation guidelines”, calling for p-values, citation rates, h-indices, or other statistics in order to […]

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2018: How did people actually vote? (The real story, not the exit polls.)

Following up on the post that we linked to last week, here’s Yair’s analysis, using Mister P, of how everyone voted. Like Yair, I think these results are much better than what you’ll see from exit polls, partly because the analysis is more sophisticated (MRP gives you state-by-state estimates in each demographic group), partly because […]

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Hey, check this out: Columbia’s Data Science Institute is hiring research scientists and postdocs!

Here’s the official announcement: The Institute’s Postdoctoral and Research Scientists will help anchor Columbia’s presence as a leader in data-science research and applications and serve as resident experts in fostering collaborations with the world-class faculty across all schools at Columbia University. They will also help guide, plan and execute data-science research, applications and technological innovations […]

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