Principal component regression in SAS

October 23, 2017
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Principal component regression in SAS

A common question on discussion forums is how to compute a principal component regression in SAS. One reason people give for wanting to run a principal component regression is that the explanatory variables in the model are highly correlated which each other, a condition known as multicollinearity. Although principal component [...] The post Principal component regression in SAS appeared first on The DO Loop.

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The network of models and Bayesian workflow

October 23, 2017
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This is important, it’s been something I’ve been thinking about for decades, it just came up in an email I wrote, and it’s refreshingly unrelated to recent topics of blog discussion, so I decided to just post it right now out of sequence (next slot on the queue is in May 2018). Right now, standard […] The post The network…

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ISOTYPE Book: Florence, Only An Ocean Between

October 23, 2017
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ISOTYPE Book: Florence, Only An Ocean Between

The book Only An Ocean Between by Lella Secor Florence contains some of the most iconic ISOTYPE charts. It was published in 1943, as part of a series called America and Britain. Unlike some other books, this one (and the other two in the series) advertise the ISOTYPE charts right on the cover. This one […]

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Pockets of Predictability

October 22, 2017
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The possibility of localized "pockets of predictability", particularly in financial markets, is obviously intriguing.  Recently I'm noticing a similarly-intriguing pocket of research on pockets of predictability.  The following paper, fo...

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Does traffic congestion make men beat up their wives?

October 22, 2017
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Max Burton-Chellew writes: I thought this paper and news story (links fixed) might be worthy of your blog? I’m no stats expert, far from it, but this paper raised some alarms for me. If the paper is fine then sorry for wasting your time, if it’s terrible then sorry for ruining your day! Why alarms […] The post Does traffic…

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Another Shout-Out for The Replication Network

October 22, 2017
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Another Shout-Out for The Replication Network

Replication in empirical economics is vitally important, and I'm delighted to be a member of The Replication Network. I've mentioned this group in previous blog posts - for instance, here and here.The list of members of TRN continues to grow - why not ...

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How to discuss your research findings without getting into “hypothesis testing”?

October 21, 2017
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Zachary Horne writes: I regularly read your blog and have recently started using Stan. One thing that you’ve brought up in the discussion of nhst [null hypothesis significance testing] is the idea that hypothesis testing itself is problematic. However, because I am an experimental psychologist, one thing I do (or I think I’m doing anyway) […] The post How to…

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Thanks, Claus Ekstrøm, for Watching My Github Repo!

Thanks, Claus Ekstrøm, for Watching My Github Repo!

Perhaps I haven’t made it clear enough in the past – as a software developer, I always need help, and there are many ways you can help me; not all these ways require strong technical skills. For example, as Charlotte Wickham mentioned in her excellent presentation at useR! this year, you can always start from contributing to the software documentation.…

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Barry Gibb came fourth in a Barry Gibb look alike contest

October 20, 2017
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Barry Gibb came fourth in a Barry Gibb look alike contest

Every day a little death, in the parlour, in the bed. In the lips and in the eyes. In the curtains in the silver, in the buttons, in the bread, in the murmurs, in the gestures, in the pauses, in the sighs. – Sondheim The most horrible sound in the world is that of a […] The post Barry Gibb…

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“La critique est la vie de la science”: I kinda get annoyed when people set themselves up as the voice of reason but don’t ever get around to explaining what’s the unreasonable thing they dislike.

October 20, 2017
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Someone pointed me to a blog post, Negative Psychology, from 2014 by Jim Coan about the replication crisis in psychology. My reaction: I find it hard to make sense of what he is saying because he doesn’t offer any examples of the “negative psychology” phenomenon that he discussing. I kinda get annoyed when people set […] The post “La critique…

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Why I think the top batting average will be higher than .311: Over-pooling of point predictions in Bayesian inference

October 19, 2017
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In a post from 22 May 2017 entitled, “Who is Going to Win the Batting Crown?”, Jim Albert writes: At this point in the season, folks are interested in extreme stats and want to predict final season measures. On the morning of Saturday May 20, here are the leading batting averages: Justin Turner .379 Ryan […] The post Why I…

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Beyond “power pose”: Using replication failures and a better understanding of data collection and analysis to do better science

October 19, 2017
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Beyond “power pose”:  Using replication failures and a better understanding of data collection and analysis to do better science

So. A bunch of people pointed me to a New York Times article by Susan Dominus about Amy Cuddy, the psychology researcher and Ted-talk star famous for the following claim (made in a paper written with Dana Carney and Andy Yap and published in 2010): That a person can, by assuming two simple 1-min poses, […] The post Beyond “power…

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The 501st Reminder About Reproducible Examples

The 501st Reminder About Reproducible Examples

First thing first. This post is not meant to complain. It is just to document one “miserable” aspect of a software developer’s (daily) life. I wrote about the “reproducible example paradox” last month, and said I probably had reminded users 500 times of providing a reproducible example. Perhaps it was the 501st time this morning in rstudio/markdown#86. I’m okay with…

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Schedule R Code to Be Executed Periodically in the Current R Session

Schedule R Code to Be Executed Periodically in the Current R Session

A couple of months ago, while I was trying to implement an alternative approach for LiveReload in blogdown (Section D.2) using Hugo’s built-in server, I played with Joe’s later package for a little while, and my colleague Gabor gave me an interesting, useful, and elegant tip. I thought it might be useful to other people, too, so I’m writing it…

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A Few Joyful Moments of A Software Developer

A Few Joyful Moments of A Software Developer

Maëlle Salmon announced her “new session” (a cute newborn) on Twitter, and I was delighted and honored to see the knitr hex logo on her blanket. Welcome to the woRld, little Émile! That reminded me of a few other joyful moments. Occasionally, I receive thank-you notes and gifts from users, such as this card in a package: and this picture…

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No tradeoff between regularization and discovery

October 18, 2017
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We had a couple recent discussions regarding questionable claims based on p-values extracted from forking paths, and in both cases (a study “trying large numbers of combinations of otherwise-unused drugs against a large number of untreatable illnesses,” and a salami-slicing exercise looking for public opinion changes in subgroups of the population), I recommended fitting a […] The post No tradeoff…

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Portrait: Danielle Albers Szafir

October 18, 2017
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Portrait: Danielle Albers Szafir

Danielle Albers Szafir received the Best Paper award for her single-author paper, Modeling Color Difference for Visualization Design at InfoVis this year. She is assistant professor at University of Colorado Boulder and runs the CU VisuaLab there. Danielle works on a number of research projects centered around perception, and in particular color, but also topics like visual comparison. […]

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From perpetual motion machines to embodied cognition: The boundaries of pseudoscience are being pushed back into the trivial.

October 18, 2017
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From perpetual motion machines to embodied cognition:  The boundaries of pseudoscience are being pushed back into the trivial.

This exchange came from a comment thread last year. Diana Senechal points to this bizarre thing: Brian Little says in Me, Myself, and Us (regarding the “lemon introvert test”): One of the more interesting ways of informally assessing extraversion at the biogenic level is to do the lemon-drop test. [Description of experiment omitted from present […] The post From perpetual…

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The diffogram and other graphs for multiple comparisons of means

October 18, 2017
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The diffogram and other graphs for multiple comparisons of means

In a previous article, I discussed the lines plot for multiple comparisons of means. Another graph that is frequently used for multiple comparisons is the diffogram, which indicates whether the pairwise differences between means of groups are statistically significant. This article discusses how to interpret a diffogram. Two related plots [...] The post The diffogram and other graphs for multiple…

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splitting a field by annealing

October 17, 2017
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splitting a field by annealing

A recent riddle [from The Riddle] that I pondered about during a [long!] drive to Luxembourg last weekend was about splitting a square field into three lots of identical surface for a minimal length of separating wire… While this led me to conclude that the best solution was a T like separation, I ran a […]

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Analyzing New Zealand fatal traffic crashes in Stan with added open-access science

October 17, 2017
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Open-access science I’ll get to the meat of this post in a second, but I just wanted to highlight how the study I’m about to talk about was done in the open and how that helped everyone. Tim Makarios read the study and responded in the blog comments, Hold on. As I first skimmed this […] The post Analyzing New…

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Lop-sided precincts, a visual exploration

October 17, 2017
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Lop-sided precincts, a visual exploration

Kaiser Fung, founder of Junk Charts, a leading data visualization blog, and Principal Analytics Prep, a premier data analytics bootcamp, discusses and remakes a Washington Post chart showing lop-sided precincts in the 2016 U.S. Presidential elections.

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Beyond forking paths: using multilevel modeling to figure out what can be learned from this survey experiment

October 17, 2017
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Under the heading, “Incompetent leaders as a protection against elite betrayal,” Tyler Cowen linked to this paper, “Populism and the Return of the ‘Paranoid Style’: Some Evidence and a Simple Model of Demand for Incompetence as Insurance against Elite Betrayal,” by Rafael Di Tella and Julio Rotemberg. From a statistical perspective, the article by Tella […] The post Beyond forking…

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