Surprise-hacking: “the narrative of blindness and illusion sells, and therefore continues to be the central thesis of popular books written by psychologists and cognitive scientists”

Teppo Felin sends along this article with Mia Felin, Joachim Krueger, and Jan Koenderink on “surprise-hacking,” and writes: We essentially see surprise-hacking as the upstream, theoretical cousin of p-hacking. Though, surprise-hacking can’t be resolved with replication, more data or preregistration. We use perception and priming research to make these points (linking to Kahneman and priming, […]

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“My advisor and I disagree on how we should carry out repeated cross-validation. We would love to have a third expert opinion…”

Youyou Wu writes: I’m a postdoc studying scientific reproducibility. I have a machine learning question that I desperately need your help with. My advisor and I disagree on how we should carry out repeated cross-validation. We would love to have a third expert opinion… I’m trying to predict whether a study can be successfully replicated […]

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A couple of thoughts regarding the hot hand fallacy fallacy

For many years we all believed the hot hand was a fallacy. It turns out we were all wrong. Fine. Such reversals happen. Anyway, now that we know the score, we can reflect on some of the cognitive biases that led us to stick with the “hot hand fallacy” story for so long. Jason Collins […]

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