Anybody want a drink before the war?

February 23, 2018
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Your lallies look like darts, and you’ve got nanti carts, but I love your bona eke – Lee Sutton (A near miss) I’ve been thinking about gayface again. I guess this is for a bunch of reasons, but one of the lesser ones is that this breathless article by JD Schramm popped up in the Washington Post the other […] The post Anybody want a drink before the war? appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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Is R base::subset() really that bad?

February 23, 2018
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Is R base::subset() really that bad?

Is R base::subset() really that bad? Notes discussing subset() often refer to the following text (from help(subset), referred to in examples: 1, 2): Warning This is a convenience function intended for use interactively. For programming it is better to use the standard sub-setting functions like [, and in particular the non-standard evaluation of argument subset … Continue reading Is R…

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“If I wanted to graduate in three years, I’d just get a sociology degree.”

February 23, 2018
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From an interview with a UCLA QB who’s majoring in economics: Look, football and school don’t go together. They just don’t. Trying to do both is like trying to do two full-time jobs. . . . No one in their right mind should have a football player’s schedule, and go to school. It’s not that […] The post “If I…

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Can’t Take the Fiducial Out of Fisher (if you want to understand the N-P performance philosophy) [i]

February 23, 2018
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Can’t Take the Fiducial Out of Fisher (if you want to understand the N-P performance philosophy) [i]

Continuing with posts in recognition of R.A. Fisher’s birthday, I post one from a couple of years ago on a topic that had previously not been discussed on this blog: Fisher’s fiducial probability.  [Neyman and Pearson] “began an influential collaboration initially designed primarily, it would seem to clarify Fisher’s writing. This led to their theory […]

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Optional stopping does not bias parameter estimates (if done correctly)

February 23, 2018
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tl;dr: Optional stopping does not bias parameter estimates from a frequentist point of view if all studies are reported (i.e., no publication bias exists) and effect sizes are appropriately meta-analytically weighted. Several recent discussions on the ...

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Thanks, Alicia Schep, for Digging into knitr Engines

Alicia Schep recently discovered an interesting fact about knitr: you can not only use other languages in R Markdown (Python, Julia, C++, Bash, SQL, and so on), but also actually have full control of how to run such code chunks. In other words, these “language engines” in knitr are fully customizable and extensible. In her blog post, she expressed the…

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Why line charts are better than area charts

February 22, 2018
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Why line charts are better than area charts

Kaiser Fung (Junkcharts; Principal Analytics Prep) explains why line charts are preferable to area charts, using an example of a Dow Jones index chart.

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“Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation?” and “The Narcissism Epidemic”: How can we think about the evidence?

February 22, 2018
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“Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation?” and “The Narcissism Epidemic”:  How can we think about the evidence?

Jay Livingston points to this hypey article, “Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation?”, by Jean Twenge, who writes: I’ve been researching generational differences for 25 years . . . Typically, the characteristics that come to define a generation appear gradually, and along a continuum. . . . [But] Around 2012, I noticed abrupt shifts in teen […] The post “Have Smartphones…

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R Tip: Force Named Arguments

February 22, 2018
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R tip: force the use of named arguments when designing function signatures. R’s named function argument binding is a great aid in writing correct programs. It is a good idea, if practical, to force optional arguments to only be usable by name. To do this declare the additional arguments after “...” and enforce that none … Continue reading R Tip:…

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Minimal, Explicit, Python Style Package Loading for R

February 22, 2018
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About a year and a half back I was working in Python a bit and became accustomed to the explicit importing of modules (akin to R packages) and functions. Python imports packages like this: import tidyr import dplyr as dp … Continue reading →

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Commonwealth Games

February 21, 2018
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Commonwealth Games

Earlier this week, we found out that we have secured the Commonwealth Share Scholarship for our Master Programme in Health Economics & Decision Science.The Commonwealth Shared Scholarship Scheme is a joint initiative between the Commonwealth Schola...

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Commonwealth Games

February 21, 2018
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Commonwealth Games

Earlier this week, we found out that we have secured the Commonwealth Share Scholarship for our Master Programme in Health Economics & Decision Science.The Commonwealth Shared Scholarship Scheme is a joint initiative between the Commonwealth Schola...

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Larry Brown

February 21, 2018
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Larry Brown has passed away.  Larry was a giant of modern statistics and a towering presence at Penn (http://www-stat.wharton.upenn.edu/~lbrown/).  Simultaneously, everyone who knew him liked him, immensely. He will be missed dearly, both pro...

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R Tip: Use [[ ]] Wherever You Can

February 21, 2018
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R tip: use [[ ]] wherever you can. In R the [[ ]] is the operator that (when supplied a simple scalar argument) pulls a single element out of lists (and the [ ] operator pulls out sub-lists). For vectors [[ ]] and [ ] appear to be synonyms (modulo the issue of names). However, … Continue reading R Tip:…

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Synchronously Visualized

February 21, 2018
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Synchronously Visualized

Once again:  the New York Times presents an innovative graphic, which you always want to watch again and again. It’s this Downhill Race at the Olympics: . Start Run Finish   The link to the moving graphic is below this picture: For Statistics? It would be exciting to follow such visualizations, e. g. on changes … Continue reading Synchronously Visualized

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“Deeper into democracy: the legitimacy of challenging Brexit’s majoritarian mandate”

February 21, 2018
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There’s no reason that we should trust someone’s thoughts on politics just because he’s a good chess player, or even a good writer. That said, I found this opinion piece by Jonathan Rowson on Britain and the EU to be worth reading. Also I came across this short post by Rowson on “virtue signaling” which […] The post “Deeper into…

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A Monte Carlo algorithm to estimate a median

February 21, 2018
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A Monte Carlo algorithm to estimate a median

This article describes and implements a fast algorithm that estimates a median for very large samples. The traditional median estimate sorts a sample of size N and returns the middle value (when N is odd). The algorithm in this article uses Monte Carlo techniques to estimate the median much faster. [...] The post A Monte Carlo algorithm to estimate a…

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The #1 Question to Ask Yourself when Designing a Questionnaire

The #1 Question to Ask Yourself when Designing a Questionnaire

Surveys and questionnaires are fairly common today, and I believe most people must have filled out a few before. When I fill out questionnaires, I often cannot help thinking if the designer has tried to fill out his/her own questionnaire (eating your own dog food), because some questions are essentially very difficult to answer, although they look easy. Earlier last…

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Zoologist slams statistical significance

February 20, 2018
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Valentin Amrhein writes that statistical significance and hypothesis testing are not really helpful when it comes to testing our hypotheses. I’m not quite sure I like the title of Amrhein’s post—“Inferential Statistics is not Inferential”—as I think of parameter estimation, model checking, forecasting, etc., all as forms of inference. But I agree with his general […] The post Zoologist slams…

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Upcoming talks and workshops, NYC, Seattle, Philadelphia, St. Louis

February 20, 2018
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Upcoming talks and workshops, NYC, Seattle, Philadelphia, St. Louis

The following talks/events are all free and open to the public. If I'm in your neighborhood, please come by and say hi. You can register or learn more about the above talks at the following links: Feb 20, 2018 (tonight,...

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Upcoming talks and workshops, NYC, Seattle, Philadelphia, St. Louis

February 20, 2018
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Upcoming talks and workshops, NYC, Seattle, Philadelphia, St. Louis

The following talks/events are all free and open to the public. If I'm in your neighborhood, please come by and say hi. You can register or learn more about the above talks at the following links: Feb 20, 2018 (tonight,...

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The graphs tell the story. Now I want to fit this story into a bigger framework so it all makes sense again.

February 20, 2018
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The graphs tell the story.  Now I want to fit this story into a bigger framework so it all makes sense again.

Paul Alper points us to these graphs: Pretty stunning. I mean, really stunning. Why are we just hearing about this now, given that the pattern is a decade old? And what’s this: “Data for the U.S. ends in 2007”? Huh? Also, it’s surprising how high the rates were for Japan, Italy, and Germany in the […] The post The graphs…

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R. A. Fisher: How an Outsider Revolutionized Statistics (Aris Spanos)

February 19, 2018
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R. A. Fisher: How an Outsider Revolutionized Statistics (Aris Spanos)

In recognition of R.A. Fisher’s birthday on February 17…. ‘R. A. Fisher: How an Outsider Revolutionized Statistics’ by Aris Spanos Few statisticians will dispute that R. A. Fisher (February 17, 1890 – July 29, 1962) is the father of modern statistics; see Savage (1976), Rao (1992). Inspired by William Gosset’s (1908) paper on the Student’s […]

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