Posts Tagged ‘ Bayesian statistics ’

Stan Model of the Week: Hierarchical Modeling of Supernovas

April 21, 2014
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Stan Model of the Week: Hierarchical Modeling of Supernovas

The Stan Model of the Week showcases research using Stan to push the limits of applied statistics.  If you have a model that you would like to submit for a future post then send us an email. Our inaugural post comes from Nathan Sanders, a graduate student finishing up his thesis on astrophysics at Harvard. […]The post Stan Model of the Week: Hierarchical Modeling of Supernovas appeared first on Statistical…

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My talks @ Universitat de Girona

April 18, 2014
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My talks @ Universitat de Girona

Just after Easter, I'll go for a very quick trip to lovely Girona, where Marc Saez has invited me to give two talks.The first one will be a re-run of the short course on INLA that I did at Bayes Pharma last year. It's scheduled (and prepared) as a 3-ho...

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One-tailed or two-tailed?

April 18, 2014
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One-tailed or two-tailed?

Someone writes: Suppose I have two groups of people, A and B, which differ on some characteristic of interest to me; and for each person I measure a single real-valued quantity X. I have a theory that group A has a higher mean value of X than group B. I test this theory by using […]The post One-tailed or two-tailed? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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If you get to the point of asking, just do it. But some difficulties do arise . . .

April 17, 2014
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Nelson Villoria writes: I find the multilevel approach very useful for a problem I am dealing with, and I was wondering whether you could point me to some references about poolability tests for multilevel models. I am working with time series of cross sectional data and I want to test whether the data supports cross […]The post If you get to the point of asking, just do it. But some…

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Looking for Bayesian expertise in India, for the purpose of analysis of sarcoma trials

April 16, 2014
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Prakash Nayak writes: I work as a musculoskeletal oncologist (surgeon) in Mumbai, India and am keen on sarcoma research. Sarcomas are rare disorders, and conventional frequentist analysis falls short of providing meaningful results for clinical application. I am thus keen on applying Bayesian analysis to a lot of trials performed with small numbers in this […]The post Looking for Bayesian expertise in India, for the purpose of analysis of sarcoma…

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Bayes Pharma 2014 – nearly there…

April 14, 2014
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Bayes Pharma 2014 – nearly there…

We're nearly done with (most of) the preparation for Bayes Pharma 2014. We've received quite a few abstracts for the contributed talks $-$ many different topics but in general very interesting work, I thought.We've managed to secure several sponsorship...

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Causal Inference in Health, Economic and Social Sciences

April 14, 2014
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The programme of the forthcoming UK Causal Inference Meeting "Causal Inference in Health, Economic and Social Sciences" is just out. The short conference will be at the end of the month (28th and 29th of April) at the University of Cambridge.I ind...

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Transitioning to Stan

April 14, 2014
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Kevin Cartier writes: I’ve been happily using R for a number of years now and recently came across Stan. Looks big and powerful, so I’d like to pick an appropriate project and try it out. I wondered if you could point me to a link or document that goes into the motivation for this tool […]The post Transitioning to Stan appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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“Schools of statistical thoughts are sometimes jokingly likened to religions. This analogy is not perfect—unlike religions, statistical methods have no supernatural content and make essentially no demands on our personal lives. Looking at the comparison from the other direction, it is possible to be agnostic, atheistic, or simply live one’s life without religion, but it is not really possible to do statistics without some philosophy.”

April 12, 2014
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This bit is perhaps worth saying again, especially given the occasional trolling on the internet by people who disparage their ideological opponents by calling them “religious” . . . So here it is: Sometimes the choice of statistical philosophy is decided by convention or convenience. . . . In many settings, however, we have freedom […]The post “Schools of statistical thoughts are sometimes jokingly likened to religions. This analogy is…

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How literature is like statistical reasoning: Kosara on stories. Gelman and Basbøll on stories.

April 7, 2014
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In “Story: A Definition,” visual analysis researcher Robert Kosara writes: A story ties facts together. There is a reason why this particular collection of facts is in this story, and the story gives you that reason. provides a narrative path through those facts. In other words, it guides the viewer/reader through the world, rather than just throwing […]The post How literature is like statistical reasoning: Kosara on stories. Gelman and Basbøll on…

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