Posts Tagged ‘ Zombies ’

The puzzle: Why do scientists typically respond to legitimate scientific criticism in an angry, defensive, closed, non-scientific way? The answer: We’re trained to do this during the process of responding to peer review.

January 13, 2018
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[image of Cantor’s corner] Here’s the “puzzle,” as we say in social science. Scientific research is all about discovery of the unexpected: to do research, you need to be open to new possibilities, to design experiments to force anomalies, and to learn from them. The sweet spot for any researcher is at Cantor’s corner. (See […] The post The puzzle: Why do scientists typically respond to legitimate scientific criticism in…

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The retraction paradox: Once you retract, you implicitly have to defend all the many things you haven’t yet retracted

January 12, 2018
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Mark Palko points to this news article by Beth Skwarecki on Goop, “the Gwyneth Paltrow pseudoscience empire.” Here’s Skwarecki: When Goop publishes something weird or, worse, harmful, I often find myself wondering what are they thinking? Recently, on Jimmy Kimmel, Gwyneth laughed at some of the newsletter’s weirder recommendations and said “I don’t know what […] The post The retraction paradox: Once you retract, you implicitly have to defend all…

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Alzheimer’s Mouse research on the Orient Express

January 9, 2018
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Paul Alper sends along an article from Joy Victory at Health News Review, shooting down a bunch of newspaper headlines (“Extra virgin olive oil staves off Alzheimer’s, preserves memory, new study shows” from USA Today, the only marginally better “Can extra-virgin olive oil preserve memory and prevent Alzheimer’s?” from the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, and the better […] The post <del>Alzheimer’s</del> Mouse research on the Orient Express appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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It’s . . . spam-tastic!

December 25, 2017
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It’s . . . spam-tastic!

We’ll celebrate Christmas today with a scam that almost fooled me. OK, not quite: I was about two steps from getting caught. Here’s the email: Dear Dr. Gelman, I hope you do not mind me emailing you directly, I thought it would be the easiest way to make first contact. If you have time for […] The post It’s . . . spam-tastic! appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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The piranha problem in social psychology / behavioral economics: The “take a pill” model of science eats itself

December 15, 2017
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[cat picture] A fundamental tenet of social psychology, behavioral economics, at least how it is presented in the news media, and taught and practiced in many business schools, is that small “nudges,” often the sorts of things that we might not think would affect us at all, can have big effects on behavior. Thus the […] The post The piranha problem in social psychology / behavioral economics: The “take a…

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Yes, you can do statistical inference from nonrandom samples. Which is a good thing, considering that nonrandom samples are pretty much all we’ve got.

December 13, 2017
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Luiz Caseiro writes: 1. P-values and Confidence Intervals are used to draw inferences about a population from a sample. Is that right? 2. As far as I researched, standard statistical softwares usually compute confidence intervals (CI) and p-values assuming that we have a simple random sample. Is that right? 3. If we have another kind […] The post Yes, you can do statistical inference from nonrandom samples. Which is a…

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The “80% power” lie

December 5, 2017
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OK, so this is nothing new. Greg Francis said it, and Uri Simonsohn said it, Ulrich Schimmack said it, lots of people have said it. But it’s worth saying again. To get NIH funding, you need to demonstrate (that is, convincingly claim) that your study has 80% power. I hate the term “power” as it’s […] The post The “80% power” lie appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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Popular expert explains why communists can’t win chess championships!

December 4, 2017
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Popular expert explains why communists can’t win chess championships!

[cat picture] We haven’t run any Ray Keene material for awhile but this is just too good to pass up: Yup, those communists have real trouble pushing to the top when it comes to chess, huh? P.S. to Chrissy: If you happen to be reading this, my advice to you is to not take stuff […] The post Popular expert explains why communists can’t win chess championships! appeared first on…

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Oooh, I hate all talk of false positive, false negative, false discovery, etc.

November 30, 2017
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A correspondent writes: I think this short post on p value, bayes, and false discovery rate contains some misinterpretations. My reply: Oooh, I hate all talk of false positive, false negative, false discovery, etc. I posted this not because I care about someone, somewhere, being “wrong on the internet.” Rather, I just think there’s so […] The post Oooh, I hate all talk of false positive, false negative, false discovery,…

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Driving a stake through that ages-ending-in-9 paper

November 28, 2017
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David Richter writes: Here’s a letter to the editor [in PPNAS] in response to the ‘people with ages ending in 9’ paper? We point out some problems with their analyses and their data and tried to replicate their theory in a large German panel study using a within-subjects design and variables close to those used […] The post Driving a stake through that ages-ending-in-9 paper appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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