Posts Tagged ‘ Zombies ’

Publication bias occurs within as well as between projects

August 30, 2016
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Kent Holsinger points to this post by Kevin Drum entitled, “Publication Bias Is Boring. You Should Care About It Anyway,” and writes: I am an evolutionary biologist, not a psychologist, but this article describes a disturbing Scenario concerning oxytocin research that seems plausible. It is also relevant to the reproducibility/publishing issues you have been discussing […] The post Publication bias occurs within as well as between projects appeared first on…

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I know I said I wouldn’t blog for awhile, but this one was just too good to resist

August 9, 2016
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Scott Adams endorsing the power pose: Have you heard of the “victory pose.” It’s a way to change your body chemistry almost instantly by putting your hands above your head like you won something. That’s a striking example of how easy it is to manipulate your mood and thoughts by changing your body’s condition. So […] The post I know I said I wouldn’t blog for awhile, but this one…

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Shameless little bullies claim that published triathlon times don’t replicate

August 8, 2016
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Shameless little bullies claim that published triathlon times don’t replicate

Paul Alper sends along this inspiring story of Julie Miller, a heroic triathlete who just wants to triathle in peace, but she keeps getting hassled by the replication police. Those shameless little bullies won’t let her just do her thing, instead they harp on technicalities like missing timing clips and crap like that. Who cares […] The post Shameless little bullies claim that published triathlon times don’t replicate appeared first…

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Documented forking paths in the Competitive Reaction Time Task

August 7, 2016
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Documented forking paths in the Competitive Reaction Time Task

Baruch Eitan writes: This is some luscious garden of forking paths. Indeed. Here’s what Malte Elson writes at the linked website: The Competitive Reaction Time Task, sometimes also called the Taylor Aggression Paradigm (TAP), is one of the most commonly used tests to purportedly measure aggressive behavior in a laboratory environment. . . . While […] The post Documented forking paths in the Competitive Reaction Time Task appeared first on…

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“What can recent replication failures tell us about the theoretical commitments of psychology?”

August 6, 2016
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“What can recent replication failures tell us about the theoretical commitments of psychology?”

Psychology/philosophy professor Stan Klein was motivated by our power pose discussion to send along this article which seems to me to be a worthy entry in what I’ve lately been calling “the literature of exasperation,” following in the tradition of Meehl etc. I offer one minor correction. Klein writes, “I have no doubt that the […] The post “What can recent replication failures tell us about the theoretical commitments of…

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Fish cannot carry p-values

July 28, 2016
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Following up on our discussion from last week on inference for fisheries, Anders Lamberg writes: Since I first sent you the question, there has been a debate here too. In the discussion you send, there is a debate both about the actual sampling (the mathematics) and about more the practical/biological issues. How accurate can farmed […] The post Fish cannot carry p-values appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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“The Dark Side of Power Posing”

July 23, 2016
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Shravan points us to this post from Jay Van Bavel a couple years ago. It’s an interesting example because Bavel expresses skepticism about the “power pose” hype but he makes the same general mistake of Carney, Cuddy, Yap, and other researchers in this area in that he overreacts to every bit of noise that’s been […] The post “The Dark Side of Power Posing” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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No, Google will not “sway the presidential election”

July 19, 2016
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Grrr, this is annoying. A piece of exaggerated science reporting hit PPNAS and was promoted in Politico, then Kaiser Fung and I shot it down (“Could Google Rig the 2016 Election? Don’t Believe the Hype”) in our Daily Beast column last September. Then it appeared again this week in a news article in the Christian […] The post No, Google will not “sway the presidential election” appeared first on Statistical…

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Moving statistical theory from a “discovery” framework to a “measurement” framework

July 18, 2016
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Avi Adler points to this post by Felix Schönbrodt on “What’s the probability that a significant p-value indicates a true effect?” I’m sympathetic to the goal of better understanding what’s in a p-value (see for example my paper with John Carlin on type M and type S errors) but I really don’t like the framing […] The post Moving statistical theory from a “discovery” framework to a “measurement” framework appeared…

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I know you guys think I have no filter, but . . .

July 13, 2016
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. . . Someone sent me a juicy bit of news related to one of our frequent blog topics, and I shot back a witty response (or, at least, it seemed witty to me), but I decided not to post it here because I was concerned that people might take it as a personal attack […] The post I know you guys think I have no filter, but . .…

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