Posts Tagged ‘ Zombies ’

fMRI clusterf******

December 10, 2016
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fMRI clusterf******

Several people pointed me to this paper by Anders Eklund, Thomas Nichols, and Hans Knutsson, which begins: Functional MRI (fMRI) is 25 years old, yet surprisingly its most common statistical methods have not been validated using real data. Here, we used resting-state fMRI data from 499 healthy controls to conduct 3 million task group analyses. […] The post fMRI clusterf****** appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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“Dear Major Textbook Publisher”: A Rant

December 7, 2016
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“Dear Major Textbook Publisher”:  A Rant

Dear Major Academic Publisher, You just sent me, unsolicited, an introductory statistics textbook that is 800 pages and weighs about 5 pounds. It’s the 3rd edition of a book by someone I’ve never heard of. That’s fine—a newcomer can write a good book. The real problem is that the book is crap. It’s just the […] The post “Dear Major Textbook Publisher”: A Rant appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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Hot hand 1, WSJ 0

December 6, 2016
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Hot hand 1, WSJ 0

In a generally good book review on “uncertainty and the limits of human reason,” William Easterly writes: Failing to process uncertainty correctly, we attach too much importance to too small a number of observations. Basketball teams believe that players suddenly have a “hot hand” after they have made a string of baskets, so you should […] The post Hot hand 1, WSJ 0 appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Data 1, NPR 0

December 6, 2016
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Data 1, NPR 0

Jay “should replace the Brooks brothers on the NYT op-ed page” Livingston writes: There it was again, the panic about the narcissism of millennialas as evidenced by selfies. This time it was NPR’s podcast Hidden Brain. The show’s host Shankar Vedantam chose to speak with only one researcher on the topic – psychologist Jean Twenge, […] The post Data 1, NPR 0 appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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“A bug in fMRI software could invalidate 15 years of brain research”

November 29, 2016
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“A bug in fMRI software could invalidate 15 years of brain research”

About 50 people pointed me to this press release or the underlying PPNAS research article, “Cluster failure: Why fMRI inferences for spatial extent have inflated false-positive rates,” by Anders Eklund, Thomas Nichols, and Hans Knutsson, who write: Functional MRI (fMRI) is 25 years old, yet surprisingly its most common statistical methods have not been validated […] The post “A bug in fMRI software could invalidate 15 years of brain research”…

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“Breakfast skipping, extreme commutes, and the sex composition at birth”

November 24, 2016
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“Breakfast skipping, extreme commutes, and the sex composition at birth”

Bhash Mazumder sends along a paper (coauthored with Zachary Seeskin) which begins: A growing body of literature has shown that environmental exposures in the period around conception can affect the sex ratio at birth through selective attrition that favors the survival of female conceptuses. Glucose availability is considered a key indicator of the fetal environment, […] The post “Breakfast skipping, extreme commutes, and the sex composition at birth” appeared first…

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Good news! PPNAS releases updated guidelines for getting a paper published in their social science division

November 18, 2016
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Good news!  PPNAS releases updated guidelines for getting a paper published in their social science division

From zero to Ted talk in 18 simple steps: Rolf Zwaan explains how to do it! The advice is from 2013 but I think it still just might work. Here’s Zwaan: How to Cook up Your Own Social Priming Article 1. Come up with an idea for a study. Don’t sweat it. It’s not as […] The post Good news! PPNAS releases updated guidelines for getting a paper published in…

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Sniffing tears perhaps not as effective as claimed

November 16, 2016
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Sniffing tears perhaps not as effective as claimed

Marcel van Assen has a story to share: In 2011 a rather amazing article was published in Science where the authors claim that “We found that merely sniffing negative-emotion-related odorless tears obtained from women donors induced reductions in sexual appeal attributed by men to pictures of women’s faces.” The article is this: Gelstein, S., Yeshurun, […] The post Sniffing tears perhaps not as effective as claimed appeared first on Statistical…

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Josh Miller hot hand talks in NYC and Pittsburgh this week

November 15, 2016
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Josh Miller hot hand talks in NYC and Pittsburgh this week

Joshua Miller (the person who, with Adam Sanjurjo, discovered why the so-called “hot hand fallacy” is not really a fallacy) will be speaking on the topic this week. In New York, Thurs 17 Nov, 12:30pm, 19 W 4th St, room 517, Center for Experimental Social Science seminar. In Pittsburgh, Fri 18 Nov, 12pm, 4716 Posvsar […] The post Josh Miller hot hand talks in NYC and Pittsburgh this week appeared…

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“Another terrible plot”

November 8, 2016
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Till Hoffman sent me an email with the above subject line and the following content: These plots from the Daily Mail in the UK probably belong in your hall of fame of terrible visualisations: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3655775/The-polls-finally-open-Britain-s-historic-Referendum-vote-latest-polls-Remain-camp-lead-six-points-weather-swing-Brexit.html I was gonna click on this, but then I thought . . . the Daily Mail? Even I have limits […] The post “Another terrible plot” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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