Posts Tagged ‘ Zombies ’

Best correction ever: “Unfortunately, the correct values are impossible to establish, since the raw data could not be retrieved.”

June 23, 2017
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Best correction ever:  “Unfortunately, the correct values are impossible to establish, since the raw data could not be retrieved.”

Commenter Erik Arnesen points to this: Several errors and omissions occurred in the reporting of research and data in our paper: “How Descriptive Food Names Bias Sensory Perceptions in Restaurants,” Food Quality and Preference (2005) . . . The dog ate my data. Damn gremlins. I hate when that happens. As the saying goes, “Each […] The post Best correction ever: “Unfortunately, the correct values are impossible to establish, since…

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After Peptidegate, a proposed new slogan for PPNAS. And, as a bonus, a fun little graphics project.

June 21, 2017
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After Peptidegate, a proposed new slogan for PPNAS.  And, as a bonus, a fun little graphics project.

Someone pointed me to this post by “Neuroskeptic”: A new paper in the prestigious journal PNAS contains a rather glaring blooper. . . . right there in the abstract, which states that “three neuropeptides (β-endorphin, oxytocin, and dopamine) play particularly important roles” in human sociality. But dopamine is not a neuropeptide. Neither are serotonin or […] The post After Peptidegate, a proposed new slogan for PPNAS. And, as a bonus,…

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Not everyone’s aware of falsificationist Bayes

June 20, 2017
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Stephen Martin writes: Daniel Lakens recently blogged about philosophies of science and how they relate to statistical philosophies. I thought it may be of interest to you. In particular, this statement: From a scientific realism perspective, Bayes Factors or Bayesian posteriors do not provide an answer to the main question of interest, which is the […] The post Not everyone’s aware of falsificationist Bayes appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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Pizzagate gets even more ridiculous: “Either they did not read their own previous pizza buffet study, or they do not consider it to be part of the literature . . . in the later study they again found the exact opposite, but did not comment on the discrepancy.”

June 15, 2017
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Pizzagate gets even more ridiculous:  “Either they did not read their own previous pizza buffet study, or they do not consider it to be part of the literature . . . in the later study they again found the exact opposite, but did not comment on the discrepancy.”

Background Several months ago, Jordan Anaya​, Tim van der Zee, and Nick Brown reported that they’d uncovered 150 errors in 4 papers published by Brian Wansink, a Cornell University business school professor and who describes himself as a “world-renowned eating behavior expert for over 25 years.” 150 errors is pretty bad! I make mistakes myself […] The post Pizzagate gets even more ridiculous: “Either they did not read their own…

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Why I’m not participating in the Transparent Psi Project

June 11, 2017
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I received the following email from psychology researcher Zoltan Kekecs: I would like to ask you to participate in the establishment of the expert consensus design of a large scale fully transparent replication of Bem’s (2011) ‘Feeling the future’ Experiment 1. Our initiative is called the ‘Transparent Psi Project’. [https://osf.io/jk2zf/wiki/home/] Our aim is to develop […] The post Why I’m not participating in the Transparent Psi Project appeared first on…

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Financial anomalies are contingent on being unknown

June 10, 2017
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Jonathan Falk points us to this article by Kewei Hou, Chen Xue, and Lu Zhang, who write: In retrospect, the anomalies literature is a prime target for p-hacking. First, for decades, the literature is purely empirical in nature, with little theoretical guidance. Second, with trillions of dollars invested in anomalies-based strategies in the U.S.market alone, […] The post Financial anomalies are contingent on being unknown appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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The (Lance) Armstrong Principle

June 8, 2017
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If you push people to promise more than they can deliver, they’re motivated to cheat. The post The (Lance) Armstrong Principle appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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Another serious error in my published work!

June 1, 2017
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Uh oh, I’m starting to feel like that pizzagate guy . . . Here’s the background. When I talk about my serious published errors, I talk about my false theorem, I talk about my empirical analysis that was invalidated by miscoded data, I talk my election maps whose flaws were pointed out by an angry […] The post Another serious error in my published work! appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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All the things we have to do that we don’t really need to do: The social cost of junk science

May 28, 2017
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I’ve been thinking a lot about junk science lately. Some people have said it’s counterproductive or rude of me to keep talking about the same few examples (actually I think we have about 15 or so examples that come up again and again), so let me just speak generically about the sort of scientific claim […] The post All the things we have to do that we don’t really need…

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Some natural solutions to the p-value communication problem—and why they won’t work.

May 21, 2017
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Some natural solutions to the p-value communication problem—and why they won’t work.

John Carlin and I write: It is well known that even experienced scientists routinely misinterpret p-values in all sorts of ways, including confusion of statistical and practical significance, treating non-rejection as acceptance of the null hypothesis, and interpreting the p-value as some sort of replication probability or as the posterior probability that the null hypothesis […] The post Some natural solutions to the p-value communication problem—and why they won’t work.…

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