Posts Tagged ‘ Zombies ’

64 Shades of Gray: The subtle effect of chessboard images on foreign policy polarization

April 27, 2016
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64 Shades of Gray:  The subtle effect of chessboard images on foreign policy polarization

Brian Nosek pointed me to this 2013 paper by Theodora Zarkadi and Simone Schnall, “‘Black and White’ thinking: Visual contrast polarizes moral judgment,” which begins: Recent research has emphasized the role of intuitive processes in morality by documenting the link between affect and moral judgment. The present research tested whether incidental visual cues without any […] The post 64 Shades of Gray: The subtle effect of chessboard images on foreign…

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Risk aversion is a two-way street

April 24, 2016
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Risk aversion is a two-way street

“Risk aversion” comes up a lot in microeconomics, but I think that it’s too broad a concept to do much for us. In many many cases, it seems to me that, when there is a decision option, either behavior X or behavior not-X can be thought as risk averse, depending on the framing. Thus, when […] The post Risk aversion is a two-way street appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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Should I be upset that the NYT credulously reviewed a book promoting iffy science?

April 10, 2016
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Should I be upset that the NYT credulously reviewed a book promoting iffy science?

I want to say “junk science,” but that’s not quite right. The claims in questions are iffy, far from proven, and could not be replicated, but they still might be true. As usual, my criticism is the claim that the evidence is strong, when it isn’t. From the review, by Heather Havrilesky: The social psychologist […] The post Should I be upset that the NYT credulously reviewed a book promoting…

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“A strong anvil need not fear the hammer”

April 4, 2016
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“A strong anvil need not fear the hammer”

Wagenmakers et al. write: A single experiment cannot overturn a large body of work. . . . An empirical debate is best organized around a series of preregistered replications, and perhaps the authors whose work we did not replicate will feel inspired to conduct their own preregistered studies. In our opinion, science is best served […] The post “A strong anvil need not fear the hammer” appeared first on Statistical…

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Himmicanes and hurricanes update

April 2, 2016
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Stuart Buck points us to this new paper by Gary Smith that eviscerates the notorious himmicanes and hurricanes paper. Here’s how Smith’s paper begins: Abstract It has been argued that female-named hurricanes are deadlier because people do not take them seriously. However, this conclusion is based on a questionable statistical analysis of a narrowly defined […] The post Himmicanes and hurricanes update appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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Gresham’s Law of experimental methods

March 31, 2016
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Gresham’s Law of experimental methods

A cognitive scientist writes: You’ll be interested to see a comment from one of my students, who’s trying to follow all your advice: It’s hard to see all this bullshit in top journals, while I see that if I do things right, it takes a long time, and I don’t have the beautiful results these […] The post Gresham’s Law of experimental methods appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Will. Not. Rise. To. Bait.

March 23, 2016
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Someone sends me an email, “I don’t know what to do with this so I thought I would send it to you,” with a link to a university press release about a recently published research paper, full of silly statistical errors and signifying nothing. I replied: Can’t you just ignore this? Why give it any […] The post Will. Not. Rise. To. Bait. appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Bruised and battered, I couldn’t tell what I felt. I was ungeneralizable to myself.

March 9, 2016
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Bruised and battered, I couldn’t tell what I felt.  I was ungeneralizable to myself.

One more rep. The new thing you just have to read, if you’re following the recent back-and-forth on replication in psychology, is this post at Retraction Watch in which Nosek et al. respond to criticisms from Gilbert et al. regarding the famous replication project. Gilbert et al. claimed that many of the replications in the […] The post Bruised and battered, I couldn’t tell what I felt. I was ungeneralizable…

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Replication crisis crisis: Why I continue in my “pessimistic conclusions about reproducibility”

March 5, 2016
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Replication crisis crisis:  Why I continue in my “pessimistic conclusions about reproducibility”

A couple days we again discussed the replication crisis in psychology—the problem that all sorts of ridiculous studies on topics such as political moderation and shades of gray, or power pose, or fat arms and political attitudes, or ovulation and vote preference, or ovulation and clothing, or beauty and sex ratios, or elderly-related words and […] The post Replication crisis crisis: Why I continue in my “pessimistic conclusions about reproducibility”…

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Creationist article Article with creationist language published in Plos-One

March 4, 2016
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Creationist article Article with creationist language published in Plos-One

Dan Gianola pointed me to this one. It’s an article by Ming-Jin Liu, Cai-Hua Xiong, Le Xiong, and Xiao-Lin Huang with the innocuous title, “Biomechanical Characteristics of Hand Coordination in Grasping Activities of Daily Living,” and a boring abstract: Hand coordination can allow humans to have dexterous control with many degrees of freedom to perform […] The post Creationist article Article with creationist language published in Plos-One appeared first on…

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