Posts Tagged ‘ Zombies ’

“Babbage was out to show that not only was the system closed, with a small group controlling access to the purse strings and the same individuals being selected over and again for the few scientific honours or paid positions that existed, but also that one of the chief beneficiaries . . . was undeserving.”

August 19, 2017
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Fernando Martel Garcia writes: Here’s an early reference from the Victorian Age. Enjoy! It’s a news article by Rebekah Higgitt called “Fraud and the decline of science,” subtitled, “Charles Babbage’s accusations of fraudulent science underlined his attack on scientific governance, but were also bitterly personal.” My reply: Wow! I think I’m on Babbage’s side on […] The post “Babbage was out to show that not only was the system closed,…

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Just google “Despite limited statistical power”

August 17, 2017
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Here it is. It’s not always clear what people mean by this expression, but sometimes it seems that they’re making the “What does not kill my statistical significance makes it stronger” fallacy, thinking that the attainment of statistical significance is a particular feat in the context of a noisy study, so that they’re (mistakenly) thinking […] The post Just google “Despite limited statistical power” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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Also holding back progress are those who make mistakes and then label correct arguments as “nonsensical.”

August 16, 2017
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Here’s James Heckman in 2013: Also holding back progress are those who claim that Perry and ABC are experiments with samples too small to accurately predict widespread impact and return on investment. This is a nonsensical argument. Their relatively small sample sizes actually speak for — not against — the strength of their findings. Dramatic […] The post Also holding back progress are those who make mistakes and then label…

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I love when I get these emails!

August 10, 2017
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On Jan 27, 2017, at 12:24 PM, ** wrote: Hi Andrew, I hope you are well. I work for ** and we are looking to chat to someone who knows about Freud – I read that you used to be an expert in Freud? Is that correct? Background here. The post I love ...

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“This finding did not reach statistical sig­nificance, but it indicates a 94.6% prob­ability that statins were responsible for the symptoms.”

August 6, 2017
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Charles Jackson writes: The attached item from JAMA, which I came across in my doctor’s waiting room, contains the statements: Nineteen of 203 patients treated with statins and 10 of 217 patients treated with placebo met the study definition of myalgia (9.4% vs 4.6%. P = .054). This finding did not reach statistical sig­nificance, but […] The post “This finding did not reach statistical sig­nificance, but it indicates a 94.6%…

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PPNAS again: If it hadn’t been for the jet lag, would Junior have banged out 756 HRs in his career?

August 4, 2017
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In an email with subject line, “Difference between “significant” and “not significant”: baseball edition?”, Greg Distelhorst writes: I think it’s important to improve statistical practice in the social sciences. I also care about baseball. In this PNAS article, Table 1 and the discussion of differences between east vs. west and home vs. away effects do […] The post PPNAS again: If it hadn’t been for the jet lag, would Junior…

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Letter to the Editor of Perspectives on Psychological Science

July 31, 2017
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[relevant cat picture] tl;dr: Himmicane in a teacup. Back in the day, the New Yorker magazine did not have a Letters to the Editors column, and so the great Spy magazine (the Gawker of its time) ran its own feature, Letters to the Editor of the New Yorker, where they posted the letters you otherwise […] The post Letter to the Editor of Perspectives on Psychological Science appeared first on…

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Delegate at Large

July 29, 2017
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Asher Meir points to this delightful garden of forking paths, which begins: • Politicians on the right look more beautiful in Europe, the U.S. and Australia. • As beautiful people earn more, they are more likely to oppose redistribution. • Voters use beauty as a cue for conservatism in low-information elections. • Politicians on the […] The post Delegate at Large appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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“Statistics textbooks (including mine) are part of the problem, I think, in that we just set out ‘theta’ as a parameter to be estimated, without much reflection on the meaning of ‘theta’ in the real world.”

July 27, 2017
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Carol Nickerson pointed me to a new article by Arie Kruglanski, Marina Chernikova, Katarzyna Jasko, entitled, “Social psychology circa 2016: A field on steroids.” I wrote: 1. I have no idea what is the meaning of the title of the article. Are they saying that they’re using performance-enhancing drugs? 2. I noticed this from the […] The post “Statistics textbooks (including mine) are part of the problem, I think, in…

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How does a Nobel-prize-winning economist become a victim of bog-standard selection bias?

July 20, 2017
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Someone who wishes to remain anonymous writes in with a story: Linking to a new paper by Jorge Luis García, James J. Heckman, and Anna L. Ziff, an economist Sue Dynarski makes this “joke” on facebook—or maybe it’s not a joke: How does one adjust standard errors to account for the fact that N of […] The post How does a Nobel-prize-winning economist become a victim of bog-standard selection bias?…

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