Posts Tagged ‘ Zombies ’

Should this paper in Psychological Science be retracted? The data do not conclusively demonstrate the claim, nor do they provide strong evidence in favor. The data are, however, consistent with the claim (as well as being consistent with no effect)

June 28, 2016
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Should this paper in Psychological Science be retracted?  The data do not conclusively demonstrate the claim, nor do they provide strong evidence in favor.  The data are, however, consistent with the claim (as well as being consistent with no effect)

Retractions or corrections of published papers are rare. We routinely encounter articles with fatal flaws, but it is so rare that such articles are retracted that it’s news when it happens. Retractions sometimes happen at the request of the author (as in the link above, or in my own two retracted/corrected articles) and other times […] The post Should this paper in Psychological Science be retracted? The data do not…

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When are people gonna realize their studies are dead on arrival?

June 26, 2016
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When are people gonna realize their studies are dead on arrival?

A comment at Thomas Lumley’s blog pointed me to this discussion by Terry Burnham with an interesting story of some flashy psychology research that failed to replicate. Here’s Burnham: [In his popular book, psychologist Daniel] Kahneman discussed an intriguing finding that people score higher on a test if the questions are hard to read. The […] The post When are people gonna realize their studies are dead on arrival? appeared…

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It comes down to reality and it’s fine with me cause I’ve let it slide

June 23, 2016
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It comes down to reality and it’s fine with me cause I’ve let it slide

E. J. Wagenmakers pointed me to this recent article by Roy Baumeister, who writes: Patience and diligence may be rewarded, but competence may matter less than in the past. Getting a significant result with n = 10 often required having an intuitive flair for how to set up the most conducive situation and produce a […] The post It comes down to reality and it’s fine with me cause I’ve…

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Clarke’s Law: Any sufficiently crappy research is indistinguishable from fraud

June 20, 2016
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Clarke’s Law:  Any sufficiently crappy research is indistinguishable from fraud

The originals: Clarke’s first law: When a distinguished but elderly scientist states that something is possible, he is almost certainly right. When he states that something is impossible, he is very probably wrong. Clarke’s second law: The only way of discovering the limits of the possible is to venture a little way past them into […] The post Clarke’s Law: Any sufficiently crappy research is indistinguishable from fraud appeared first…

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Difficulty of communication in our supersaturated media environment

June 18, 2016
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Gregory Gelembiuk writes: I was wondering if you might take a look at this and, if so inclined, do some public shredding. https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B6mLpCEIGEYGYl9RZWFRcmpsZk0/view?pref=2&pli=1 http://www.snopes.com/stanford-study-proves-election-fraud-through-exit-poll-discrepancies/ http://www.boomantribune.com/story/2016/6/13/11420/5989 Claims of electoral fraud have become increasingly popular among political progressives in the last several years and, unfortunately, appear to be gaining critical mass (especially with Sanders’ loss). The “study” […] The post Difficulty of communication in our supersaturated media environment appeared first on Statistical…

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“Smaller Share of Women Ages 65 and Older Are Living Alone,” before and after age adjusment

June 14, 2016
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“Smaller Share of Women Ages 65 and Older Are Living Alone,” before and after age adjusment

After noticing this from a recent Pew Research report: Ben Hanowell wrote: This made me [Hanowell] think of your critique of Case and Deaton’s finding about non-Hispanic mortality. I wonder how much these results are driven by the fact that the population of adults aged 65 and older has gotten older with increasing lifespans, etc […] The post “Smaller Share of Women Ages 65 and Older Are Living Alone,” before…

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No, I’m not convinced by this one either.

June 11, 2016
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No, I’m not convinced by this one either.

Alex Gamma sends along a recently published article by Carola Salvi, Irene Cristofori, Jordan Grafman, and Mark Beeman, along with the note: This might be of interest to you, since it’s political science and smells bad. From The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology: Two groups of 22 college students each identified as conservatives or liberals […] The post No, I’m not convinced by this one either. appeared first on Statistical…

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Researchers demonstrate new breakthrough in public relations, promoting a study before it appears in Psychological Science or PPNAS

June 5, 2016
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Researchers demonstrate new breakthrough in public relations, promoting a study before it appears in Psychological Science or PPNAS

Ivan Oransky pointed me to this press release: Study finds honesty varies significantly between countries Research from the University of East Anglia (UEA) has found that people’s honesty varies significantly between countries. It also suggests that honesty is less important to a country’s current economic growth than during earlier periods in history. The study examined […] The post Researchers demonstrate new breakthrough in public relations, promoting a study before it…

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“The Natural Selection of Bad Science”

June 2, 2016
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That’s the title of a new paper by Paul Smaldino and Richard McElreath which presents a sort of agent-based model that reproduces the growth in the publication of junk science that we’ve seen in recent decades. Even before looking at this paper I was positively disposed toward it for two reasons. First because I do […] The post “The Natural Selection of Bad Science” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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The “power pose” of the 6th century B.C.

May 28, 2016
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From Selected Topics in the History of Mathematics by Aaron Strauss (1973): Today Pythagoras is known predominantly as a mathematician. However, in his own day and age (which was also the day and age of Buddha, Lao-Tsa, and Confucious), he was looked upon as the personification of the highest divine wisdom by his followers to […] The post The “power pose” of the 6th century B.C. appeared first on Statistical…

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