Posts Tagged ‘ Zombies ’

Hey, this is what Michael Lacour should’ve done when they asked him for his data

June 30, 2015
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Texas Town Is Charging Us $79,000 for Emails About Pool Party Abuse Cop. FOIA that, pal! The post Hey, this is what Michael Lacour should’ve done when they asked him for his data appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Socia...

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The David Brooks files: How many uncorrected mistakes does it take to be discredited?

June 16, 2015
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The David Brooks files:  How many uncorrected mistakes does it take to be discredited?

OK, why am I writing this? We all know that New York Times columnist David Brooks deals in false statistics, he’s willing and able to get factual matters wrong, he doesn’t even fact-check his own reporting, his response when people point out his mistakes is irritation rather than thanks, he won’t run a correction even […] The post The David Brooks files: How many uncorrected mistakes does it take to…

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Michael LaCour in 20 years

June 16, 2015
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Michael LaCour in 20 years

In case you were wondering what “Bruno” Lacour will be doing a couple decades from now . . . James Delaney pointed me to this CNN news article, “Connecticut’s strict gun law linked to large homicide drop” by Carina Storrs: The rate of gun-related murders fell sharply in the 10 years after Connecticut implemented a […] The post Michael LaCour in 20 years appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Of buggy whips and moral hazards; or, Sympathy for the Aapor

June 3, 2015
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Of buggy whips and moral hazards; or, Sympathy for the Aapor

We’ve talked before about those dark-ages classical survey sampling types who say you can’t do poop with opt-in samples. The funny thing is, these people do all sorts of adjustment themselves, in the sampling or in post-data weighting or both, to deal with the inevitable fact that the people you can actually reach when you […] The post Of buggy whips and moral hazards; or, Sympathy for the Aapor appeared…

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My final post on this Tony Blair thing

June 1, 2015
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My final post on this Tony Blair thing

Gur Huberman writes on the recent fraud in experiments in polisci: This comment is a reaction to the little of the discussion which I [Gur] followed, mostly in the NYTimes. What I didn’t see anybody say is that the system actually worked. First, there’s a peer-reviewed report in Science. Then other people deem the results […] The post My final post on this Tony Blair thing appeared first on Statistical…

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John Bohannon’s chocolate-and-weight-loss hoax study actually understates the problems with standard p-value scientific practice

May 29, 2015
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John Bohannon’s chocolate-and-weight-loss hoax study actually understates the problems with standard p-value scientific practice

Several people pointed me to this awesome story by John Bohannon: “Slim by Chocolate!” the headlines blared. A team of German researchers had found that people on a low-carb diet lost weight 10 percent faster if they ate a chocolate bar every day. It made the front page of Bild, Europe’s largest daily newspaper, just […] The post John Bohannon’s chocolate-and-weight-loss hoax study actually understates the problems with standard p-value…

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Cracked.com > Huffington Post, Wall Street Journal, New York Times

May 28, 2015
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David Christopher Bell goes to the trouble (link from Palko) to explain why “Every Map of ‘The Most Popular _________ by State’ Is Bullshit.” As long as enterprising P.R. firms are willing to supply unsourced data, lazy journalists (or whatever you call these people) will promote it. We saw this a few years ago in […] The post Cracked.com > Huffington Post, Wall Street Journal, New York Times appeared first…

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Creativity is the ability to see relationships where none exist

May 22, 2015
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Creativity is the ability to see relationships where none exist

Brent Goldfarb and Andrew King, in a paper to appear in the journal Strategic Management, write: In a recent issue of this journal, Bettis (2012) reports a conversation with a graduate student who forthrightly announced that he had been trained by faculty to “search for asterisks”. The student explained that he sifted through large databases […] The post Creativity is the ability to see relationships where none exist appeared first…

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Weggy update: it just gets sadder and sadder

May 21, 2015
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Uh oh, lots on research misconduct lately. Newest news is that noted Wikipedia-lifter Ed Wegman sued John Mashey, one of his critics, for $2 million dollars. Then he backed down and decided not to sue after all. Best quote from Mashey’s write-up: None of this made any sense to me, but then I am no […] The post Weggy update: it just gets sadder and sadder appeared first on Statistical…

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“I mean, what exact buttons do I have to hit?”

May 13, 2015
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While looking for something else, I happened to come across this: Unfortunately there’s the expectation that if you start with a scientific hypothesis and do a randomized experiment, there should be a high probability of learning an enduring truth. And if the subject area is exciting, there should consequently be a high probability of publication […] The post “I mean, what exact buttons do I have to hit?” appeared first…

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