Posts Tagged ‘ Zombies ’

NPR’s gonna NPR

September 29, 2016
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NPR’s gonna NPR

I was gonna give this post the title, Stat Rage More Severe in the Presence of First-Class Journals, but then I thought I’d keep it simple. Chapter 1. Background OK, here’s what happened. A couple weeks ago someone pointed me to a low-quality paper that appeared in PPNAS (the prestigious Proceedings of the National Academy […] The post NPR’s gonna NPR appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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I refuse to blog about this one

September 27, 2016
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I refuse to blog about this one

Shravan points me to this article, Twitter Language Use Reflects Psychological Differences between Democrats and Republicans, which begins with the following self-parody of an abstract: Previous research has shown that political leanings correlate with various psychological factors. While surveys and experiments provide a rich source of information for political psychology, data from social networks can […] The post I refuse to blog about this one appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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Cracks in the thin blue line

September 24, 2016
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Cracks in the thin blue line

When people screw up or cheat in their research, what do their collaborators say? The simplest case is when coauthors admit their error, as Cexun Jeffrey Cai and I did when it turned out that we’d miscoded a key variable in an analysis, invalidating the empirical claims of our award-winning paper. On the other extreme, […] The post Cracks in the thin blue line appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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Why is the scientific replication crisis centered on psychology?

September 22, 2016
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The replication crisis is a big deal. But it’s a problem in lots of scientific fields. Why is so much of the discussion about psychology research? Why not economics, which is more controversial and gets more space in the news media? Or medicine, which has higher stakes and a regular flow of well-publicized scandals? Here […] The post Why is the scientific replication crisis centered on psychology? appeared first on…

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What has happened down here is the winds have changed

September 21, 2016
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What has happened down here is the winds have changed

Someone sent me this article by psychology professor Susan Fiske, scheduled to appear in the APS Observer, a magazine of the Association for Psychological Science. The article made me a little bit sad, and I was inclined to just keep my response short and sweet, but then it seemed worth the trouble to give some […] The post What has happened down here is the winds have changed appeared first…

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“Methodological terrorism”

September 20, 2016
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“Methodological terrorism”

Methodological terrorism is when you publish a paper in a peer-reviewed journal, its claim is supported by a statistically significant t statistic of 5.03, and someone looks at your numbers, figures out that the correct value is 1.8, and then posts that correction on social media. Terrorism is when somebody blows shit up and tries […] The post “Methodological terrorism” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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Hey, PPNAS . . . this one is the fish that got away.

September 18, 2016
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Hey, PPNAS . . . this one is the fish that got away.

Uri Simonsohn just turned down the chance to publish a paper that could’ve been published in a top journal (a couple years ago I’d’ve said Psychological Science but recently they’ve somewhat cleaned up their act, so let’s say PPNAS which seems to be still going strong) followed by features in NPR, major newspapers, BoingBoing, and […] The post Hey, PPNAS . . . this one is the fish that got…

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Redemption

September 16, 2016
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Redemption

I’ve spent a lot of time mocking Mark Hauser on this blog, and I still find it annoying that, according to the accounts I’ve seen, he behaved unethically toward his graduate students and lab assistants, he never apologized for manipulating data, and, perhaps most unconscionably, he wasted the lives of who knows how many monkeys […] The post Redemption appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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An auto-mechanic-style sign for data sharing

September 16, 2016
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An auto-mechanic-style sign for data sharing

Yesterday’s story reminds me of that sign you used to see at the car repair shop: Maybe we need something similar for data access rules: DATA RATES PER HOUR If you want to write a press release for us $ 50.00 If you want to write a new paper using our data $ 90.00 If […] The post An auto-mechanic-style sign for data sharing appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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Genius is not enough: The sad story of Peter Hagelstein, living monument to the sunk-cost fallacy

September 11, 2016
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Genius is not enough:  The sad story of Peter Hagelstein, living monument to the sunk-cost fallacy

I sometimes pick up various old collections that will be suitable for bathroom reading, and so it was that the other day I was sitting on the throne reading the summer 1985 issue of Granta, entitled Science. Lots of great stuff here, including Oliver Sacks on Tourette’s syndrome, Thomas McMahan on Alexander Graham Bell, and […] The post Genius is not enough: The sad story of Peter Hagelstein, living monument…

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