Posts Tagged ‘ Zombies ’

“La critique est la vie de la science”: I kinda get annoyed when people set themselves up as the voice of reason but don’t ever get around to explaining what’s the unreasonable thing they dislike.

October 20, 2017
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Someone pointed me to a blog post, Negative Psychology, from 2014 by Jim Coan about the replication crisis in psychology. My reaction: I find it hard to make sense of what he is saying because he doesn’t offer any examples of the “negative psychology” phenomenon that he discussing. I kinda get annoyed when people set […] The post “La critique est la vie de la science”: I kinda get annoyed…

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Beyond “power pose”: Using replication failures and a better understanding of data collection and analysis to do better science

October 19, 2017
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Beyond “power pose”:  Using replication failures and a better understanding of data collection and analysis to do better science

So. A bunch of people pointed me to a New York Times article by Susan Dominus about Amy Cuddy, the psychology researcher and Ted-talk star famous for the following claim (made in a paper written with Dana Carney and Andy Yap and published in 2010): That a person can, by assuming two simple 1-min poses, […] The post Beyond “power pose”: Using replication failures and a better understanding of data…

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From perpetual motion machines to embodied cognition: The boundaries of pseudoscience are being pushed back into the trivial.

October 18, 2017
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From perpetual motion machines to embodied cognition:  The boundaries of pseudoscience are being pushed back into the trivial.

This exchange came from a comment thread last year. Diana Senechal points to this bizarre thing: Brian Little says in Me, Myself, and Us (regarding the “lemon introvert test”): One of the more interesting ways of informally assessing extraversion at the biogenic level is to do the lemon-drop test. [Description of experiment omitted from present […] The post From perpetual motion machines to embodied cognition: The boundaries of pseudoscience are…

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Beyond forking paths: using multilevel modeling to figure out what can be learned from this survey experiment

October 17, 2017
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Under the heading, “Incompetent leaders as a protection against elite betrayal,” Tyler Cowen linked to this paper, “Populism and the Return of the ‘Paranoid Style’: Some Evidence and a Simple Model of Demand for Incompetence as Insurance against Elite Betrayal,” by Rafael Di Tella and Julio Rotemberg. From a statistical perspective, the article by Tella […] The post Beyond forking paths: using multilevel modeling to figure out what can be…

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“congratulations, your article is published!” Ummm . . .

October 13, 2017
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“congratulations, your article is published!”  Ummm . . .

The following came in the email under the heading, “congratulations, your article is published!”: I don’t know that I should be congratulated on correcting an error, but sure, whatever. P.S. The above cat is adorably looking out an...

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Sudden Money

October 8, 2017
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Anne Pier Salverda writes: I’m not sure if you’re keeping track of published failures to replicate the power posing effect, but this article came out earlier this month: “Embodied power, testosterone, and overconfidence as a causal pathway to risk-taking” From the abstract: We were unable to replicate the findings of the original study and subsequently […] The post Sudden Money appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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BREAKING . . . . . . . PNAS updates its slogan!

October 4, 2017
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BREAKING . . . . . . . PNAS updates its slogan!

I’m so happy about this, no joke. Here’s the story. For awhile I’ve been getting annoyed by the junk science papers (for example, here, here, and here) that have been published by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences under the editorship of Susan T. Fiske. I’ve taken to calling it PPNAS (“Prestigious proceedings […] The post BREAKING . . . . . . . PNAS updates its slogan!…

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When considering proposals for redefining or abandoning statistical significance, remember that their effects on science will only be indirect!

October 3, 2017
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John Schwenkler organized a discussion on this hot topic, featuring posts by – Dan Benjamin, Jim Berger, Magnus Johannesson, Valen Johnson, Brian Nosek, and E. J. Wagenmakers – Felipe De Brigard – Kenny Easwaran – Andrew Gelman and Blake McShane – Kiley Hamlin – Edouard Machery – Deborah Mayo – “Neuroskeptic” – Michael Strevens – […] The post When considering proposals for redefining or abandoning statistical significance, remember that their…

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Alan Sokal’s comments on “Abandon Statistical Significance”

October 3, 2017
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The physicist and science critic writes: I just came across your paper “Abandon statistical significance”. I basically agree with your point of view, but I think you could have done more to *distinguish* clearly between several different issues: 1) In most problems in the biomedical and social sciences, the possible hypotheses are parametrized by a […] The post Alan Sokal’s comments on “Abandon Statistical Significance” appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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The “fish MRI” of international relations studies.

October 1, 2017
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Kevin Lewis pointed me to this paper by Stephen Chaudoin, Jude Hays and Raymond Hicks, “Do We Really Know the WTO Cures Cancer?”, which begins: This article uses a replication experiment of ninety-four specifications from sixteen different studies to show the severity of the problem of selection on unobservables. Using a variety of approaches, it […] The post The “fish MRI” of international relations studies. appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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