Posts Tagged ‘ Zombies ’

Division of labor and a Pizzagate solution

February 23, 2017
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Division of labor and a Pizzagate solution

I firmly believe that the general principles of social science can improve our understanding of the world. Today I want to talk about two principles—division of labor from economics, and roles from sociology—and their relevance to the Pizzagate scandal involving Brian Wansink, the Cornell University business school professor and self-described “world-renowned eating behavior expert for […] The post Division of labor and a Pizzagate solution appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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Pizzagate and Kahneman, two great flavors etc.

February 18, 2017
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Pizzagate and Kahneman, two great flavors etc.

1. The pizzagate story (of Brian Wansink, the Cornell University business school professor and self-described “world-renowned eating behavior expert for over 25 years”) keeps developing. Last week someone forwarded me an email from the deputy dean of the Cornell business school regarding concerns about some of Wansink’s work. This person asked me to post the […] The post Pizzagate and Kahneman, two great flavors etc. appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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Crossfire

February 13, 2017
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Crossfire

OK, guess the year of this quote: Experimental social psychology today seems dominated by values that suggest the following slogan: “Social psychology ought to be and is a lot of fun.” The fun comes not from the learning, but from the doing. Clever experimentation on exotic topics with a zany manipulation seems to be the […] The post Crossfire appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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Pizzagate update: Don’t try the same trick twice or people might notice

February 9, 2017
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Pizzagate update:  Don’t try the same trick twice or people might notice

I’m getting a bit sick of this one already (hence image above; also see review here from Jesse Singal) but there are a couple of interesting issues that arose in recent updates. 1. One of the weird things about the Brian Wansink affair (“Pizzagate”) was how he responded to such severe criticism (serious in its […] The post Pizzagate update: Don’t try the same trick twice or people might notice…

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Authority figures in psychology spread more happy talk, still don’t get the point that much of the published, celebrated, and publicized work in their field is no good

February 8, 2017
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Authority figures in psychology spread more happy talk, still don’t get the point that much of the published, celebrated, and publicized work in their field is no good

Susan Fiske, Daniel Schacter, and Shelley Taylor write (link from Retraction Watch): Psychology is not in crisis, contrary to popular rumor. Every few decades, critics declare a crisis, point out problems, and sometimes motivate solutions. When we were graduate students, psychology was in “crisis,” raising concerns about whether it was scientific enough. Issues of measurement […] The post Authority figures in psychology spread more happy talk, still don’t get the…

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The Mannequin

February 7, 2017
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The Mannequin

Jonathan Falk points to this article, “Examining the impact of grape consumption on brain metabolism and cognitive function in patients with mild decline in cognition: A double-blinded placebo controlled pilot study,” and writes: Drink up! N=10, no effect on thing you’re aiming at, p value result on a few brain measurements (out of?), eminently pr-able […] The post The Mannequin appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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Research connects overpublication during national sporting events to science-journalism problems

February 5, 2017
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Research connects overpublication during national sporting events to science-journalism problems

Ivan Oransky pointed me to a delightful science-based press release, “One’s ability to make money develops before birth”: Researchers from the Higher School of Economics have shown how the level of perinatal testosterone, the sex hormone, impacts a person’s earnings in life. Prior research confirms that many skills and successes are linked to the widely […] The post Research connects overpublication during national sporting events to science-journalism problems appeared first…

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Death of the Party

February 4, 2017
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Death of the Party

Under the subject line, “Example of a classy response to someone pointing out an error,” Charles Jack​son writes: In their recent book, Mazur and Stein describe the discovery of an error that one of them had made in a recent paper writing: “Happily, Bartosz Naskreki spotted this error . . .” See below for full […] The post Death of the Party appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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Pizzagate, or the curious incident of the researcher in response to to people pointing out 150 errors in four of his papers

February 3, 2017
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Pizzagate, or the curious incident of the researcher in response to to people pointing out 150 errors in four of his papers

There are a bunch of things about this story that just don’t make a lot of sense to me. For those who haven’t been following the blog recently, here’s the quick backstory: Brian Wansink is a Cornell University business school professor and self-described “world-renowned eating behavior expert for over 25 years.” It’s come out that […] The post Pizzagate, or the curious incident of the researcher in response to to…

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Pizzagate, or the curious incident of the researcher in response to people pointing out 150 errors in four of his papers

February 3, 2017
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Pizzagate, or the curious incident of the researcher in response to people pointing out 150 errors in four of his papers

There are a bunch of things about this story that just don’t make a lot of sense to me. For those who haven’t been following the blog recently, here’s the quick backstory: Brian Wansink is a Cornell University business school professor and self-described “world-renowned eating behavior expert for over 25 years.” It’s come out that […] The post Pizzagate, or the curious incident of the researcher in response to people…

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