Posts Tagged ‘ Zombies ’

New paper on psychology replication

August 28, 2015
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New paper on psychology replication

The Open Science Collaboration, a team led by psychology researcher Brian Nosek, organized the replication of 100 published psychology experiments. They report: A large portion of replications produced weaker evidence for the original findings despite using materials provided by the original authors, review in advance for methodological fidelity, and high statistical power to detect the […] The post New paper on psychology replication appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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We provide a service

August 23, 2015
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A friend writes: I got the attached solicitation [see below], and Google found me your blog post on the topic. Thank you for quickly explaining what’s going on here! As far as I can see, they’ve removed the mention of payment from this first contact message – so they’re learning! But also they have enough […] The post We provide a service appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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Plaig! (non-Wegman edition)

August 22, 2015
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Mark Vallen writes (link from here): What initially disturbed me about the art of Shepard Fairey is that it displays none of the line, modeling and other idiosyncrasies that reveal an artist’s unique personal style. His imagery appears as though it’s xeroxed or run through some computer graphics program; that is to say, it is […] The post Plaig! (non-Wegman edition) appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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Wasting time reading old comment threads

August 12, 2015
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Wasting time reading old comment threads

I was linking to something and came across this hilarious thread, which culminated in this revelation by commenter Jrc: True story: after reading this post, http://andrewgelman.com/2011/01/12/picking_pennies/, I started going to the Jamaican store aro...

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The plagiarist next door strikes back: Different standards of plagiarism in different communities

August 3, 2015
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The plagiarist next door strikes back:  Different standards of plagiarism in different communities

Commenters on this blog sometimes tell me not to waste so much time talking about plagiarism. And in the grand scheme of things, what could be more trivial than plagiarism in an obscure German book of chess anecdotes? Yet this is what I have come to talk with you about today. As usual, I will […] The post The plagiarist next door strikes back: Different standards of plagiarism in different…

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Spam!

August 2, 2015
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The following bit of irrelevance appeared on the stan-users mailing list: On Jun 11, 2015, at 11:29 AM, Joanna Caldwell wrote: Webinar: Tips & Tricks to Improve Your Logistic Regression . . . Registration Link: . . . Abstract: Logistic regression is a commonly used tool to analyze binary classification problems. However, logistic regression still […] The post Spam! appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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More gremlins: “Instead, he simply pretended the other two estimates did not exist. That is inexcusable.”

July 23, 2015
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More gremlins:  “Instead, he simply pretended the other two estimates did not exist.  That is inexcusable.”

Brandon Shollenberger writes: I’ve spent some time examining the work done by Richard Tol which was used in the latest IPCC report.  I was troubled enough by his work I even submitted a formal complaint with the IPCC nearly two months ago (I’ve not heard back from them thus far).  It expressed some of the same concerns […] The post More gremlins: “Instead, he simply pretended the other two estimates did not…

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A bad definition of statistical significance from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Effective Health Care Program

July 21, 2015
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A bad definition of statistical significance from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Effective Health Care Program

As D.M.C. would say, bad meaning bad not bad meaning good. Deborah Mayo points to this terrible, terrible definition of statistical significance from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality: Statistical Significance Definition: A mathematical technique to measure whether the results of a study are likely to be true. Statistical significance is calculated as the […] The post A bad definition of statistical significance from the U.S. Department of Health…

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Stan is Turing complete

July 17, 2015
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Stan is Turing complete. The post Stan is Turing complete appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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“Menstrual Cycle Phase Does Not Predict Political Conservatism”

July 5, 2015
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“Menstrual Cycle Phase Does Not Predict Political Conservatism”

Someone pointed me to this article by Isabel Scott and Nicholas Pound: Recent authors have reported a relationship between women’s fertility status, as indexed by menstrual cycle phase, and conservatism in moral, social and political values. We conducted a survey to test for the existence of a relationship between menstrual cycle day and conservatism. 2213 […] The post “Menstrual Cycle Phase Does Not Predict Political Conservatism” appeared first on Statistical…

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