Posts Tagged ‘ Sociology ’

What makes a mathematical formula beautiful?

July 27, 2016
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What makes a mathematical formula beautiful?

Hiro Minato pointed me to this paper (hyped here) by Semir Zeki, John Romaya, Dionigi Benincasa, and Michael Atiyah on “The experience of mathematical beauty and its neural correlates,” who report: We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to image the activity in the brains of 15 mathematicians when they viewed mathematical formulae which they […] The post What makes a mathematical formula beautiful? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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More evidence that even top researchers routinely misinterpret p-values

July 26, 2016
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More evidence that even top researchers routinely misinterpret p-values

Blake McShane writes: I wanted to write to you about something related to your ongoing posts on replication in psychology as well as your recent post the ASA statement on p-values. In addition to the many problems you and others have documented with the p-value as a measure of evidence (both those computed “honestly” and […] The post More evidence that even top researchers routinely misinterpret p-values appeared first on…

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Ioannidis: “Evidence-Based Medicine Has Been Hijacked”

July 21, 2016
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The celebrated medical-research reformer has a new paper (sent to me by Keith O’Rourke; official published version here), where he writes: As EBM [evidence-based medicine] became more influential, it was also hijacked to serve agendas different from what it originally aimed for. Influential randomized trials are largely done by and for the benefit of the […] The post Ioannidis: “Evidence-Based Medicine Has Been Hijacked” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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You can post social science papers on the new SocArxiv

July 17, 2016
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I learned about it from this post by Elizabeth Popp Berman. The temporary SocArxiv site is here. It is connected to the Open Science Framework, which we’ve heard a lot about in discussions of preregistration. You can post your papers at SocArxiv right away following these easy steps: Send an email to the following address(es) […] The post You can post social science papers on the new SocArxiv appeared first…

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Bigmilk strikes again

July 16, 2016
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Bigmilk strikes again

The post Bigmilk strikes again appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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“I would like to share some sad stories from economics related to these issues”

July 6, 2016
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“I would like to share some sad stories from economics related to these issues”

Per Pettersson-Lidbom from the Department of Economics at Stockholm University writes: I have followed your discussions about replication, criticism, and the self-correcting process of science. I would like to share some sad stories from economics related to these issues. It is the stories about three papers published in highly respected journals, i.e., the study by […] The post “I would like to share some sad stories from economics related to…

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“Positive Results Are Better for Your Career”

July 5, 2016
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Brad Stiritz writes: I thought you might enjoy reading the following Der Spiegel interview with Peter Wilmshurst. Talk about fighting the good fight! He took the path of greatest resistance, and he beat what I presume are pretty stiff odds. Then the company representatives asked me to leave some of the patients out of the […] The post “Positive Results Are Better for Your Career” appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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Broken broken windows policy?

June 29, 2016
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Broken broken windows policy?

A journalist pointed me to this recent report from the New York City Department of Investigation, which begins: Between 2010 and 2015, the New York City Police Department (NYPD) issued 1,839,414 “quality-of-life” summonses for offenses such as public urination, disorderly conduct, drinking alcohol in public, and possession of small amounts of marijuana. . . . […] The post Broken broken windows policy? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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When are people gonna realize their studies are dead on arrival?

June 26, 2016
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When are people gonna realize their studies are dead on arrival?

A comment at Thomas Lumley’s blog pointed me to this discussion by Terry Burnham with an interesting story of some flashy psychology research that failed to replicate. Here’s Burnham: [In his popular book, psychologist Daniel] Kahneman discussed an intriguing finding that people score higher on a test if the questions are hard to read. The […] The post When are people gonna realize their studies are dead on arrival? appeared…

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It comes down to reality and it’s fine with me cause I’ve let it slide

June 23, 2016
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It comes down to reality and it’s fine with me cause I’ve let it slide

E. J. Wagenmakers pointed me to this recent article by Roy Baumeister, who writes: Patience and diligence may be rewarded, but competence may matter less than in the past. Getting a significant result with n = 10 often required having an intuitive flair for how to set up the most conducive situation and produce a […] The post It comes down to reality and it’s fine with me cause I’ve…

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