Posts Tagged ‘ Sociology ’

It comes down to reality and it’s fine with me cause I’ve let it slide

June 23, 2016
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It comes down to reality and it’s fine with me cause I’ve let it slide

E. J. Wagenmakers pointed me to this recent article by Roy Baumeister, who writes: Patience and diligence may be rewarded, but competence may matter less than in the past. Getting a significant result with n = 10 often required having an intuitive flair for how to set up the most conducive situation and produce a […] The post It comes down to reality and it’s fine with me cause I’ve…

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Time-reversal heuristic as randomization, and p < .05 as conflict of interest declaration

June 22, 2016
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Alex Gamma writes: Reading your blog recently has inspired two ideas which have in common that they analogize statistical concepts with non-statistical ones related to science: The time-reversal heuristic as randomization: Pushing your idea further leads to the notion of randomization of the sequence of study “reporting”. Studies are produced sequentially, but consumers of science […] The post Time-reversal heuristic as randomization, and p < .05 as conflict of interest…

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Clarke’s Law: Any sufficiently crappy research is indistinguishable from fraud

June 20, 2016
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Clarke’s Law:  Any sufficiently crappy research is indistinguishable from fraud

The originals: Clarke’s first law: When a distinguished but elderly scientist states that something is possible, he is almost certainly right. When he states that something is impossible, he is very probably wrong. Clarke’s second law: The only way of discovering the limits of the possible is to venture a little way past them into […] The post Clarke’s Law: Any sufficiently crappy research is indistinguishable from fraud appeared first…

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How an academic urban legend can spread because of the difficulty of clear citation

June 19, 2016
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How an academic urban legend can spread because of the difficulty of clear citation

Allan Dafoe writes: I just came across this article about academic urban legends spreading because of sloppy citation practices. I found it fascinating and relevant to the conversations on your blog. The article is by Ole Bjørn Rekdal and it is indeed fascinating. It begins as follows: Many of the messages presented in respectable scientific […] The post How an academic urban legend can spread because of the difficulty of…

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research-lies-allegations-windpipe-surgery

June 16, 2016
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research-lies-allegations-windpipe-surgery

Paul Alper pointed me to this news article with the delightful url, “superstar-doctor-fired-from-swedish-institute-over-research-lies-allegations-windpipe-surgery.” Also here. It reminded me of this discussion from last year. Damn, those...

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Objects of the class “Pauline Kael”

June 15, 2016
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A woman who’s arguably the top person ever in a male-dominated field. Steve Sailer introduced the category and entered Pauline Kael (top film critic) as its inaugural member. I followed up with Alice Waters (top chef/restaurateur), Mata Hari (top spy), Agatha Christie (top mystery writer), and Helen Keller (top person who overcame a disability; sorry, […] The post Objects of the class “Pauline Kael” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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“Smaller Share of Women Ages 65 and Older Are Living Alone,” before and after age adjusment

June 14, 2016
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“Smaller Share of Women Ages 65 and Older Are Living Alone,” before and after age adjusment

After noticing this from a recent Pew Research report: Ben Hanowell wrote: This made me [Hanowell] think of your critique of Case and Deaton’s finding about non-Hispanic mortality. I wonder how much these results are driven by the fact that the population of adults aged 65 and older has gotten older with increasing lifespans, etc […] The post “Smaller Share of Women Ages 65 and Older Are Living Alone,” before…

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Racial classification sociology controversy update

June 10, 2016
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The other day I posted on a controversy in sociology where Aliya Saperstein and Andrew Penner analyzed data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, coming to the conclusion that “that race is not a fixed characteristic of individuals but is flexible and continually negotiated in everyday interactions,” but then Lance Hannon and Robert DeFina […] The post Racial classification sociology controversy update appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Social problems with a paper in Social Problems

June 7, 2016
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Social problems with a paper in Social Problems

Here’s the story. In 2010, sociologists Aliya Saperstein and Andrew Penner published in the journal Social Problems a paper, “The race of a criminal record: How incarceration colors racial perceptions,” reporting: This study extends the conversation by exploring whether being incarcerated affects how individuals perceive their own race as well as how they are perceived […] The post Social problems with a paper in Social Problems appeared first on Statistical…

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Taking responsibility for your statistical conclusions: You must decide what variation to compare to.

June 4, 2016
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Taking responsibility for your statistical conclusions:  You must decide what variation to compare to.

A couple people pointed me to a recent paper by Josh Terrell, Andrew Kofink, Justin Middleton, Clarissa Rainear, Emerson Murphy-Hill​, and Chris Parnin, “Gender bias in open source: Pull request acceptance of women versus men.” The term “bias” seems a bit loaded given the descriptive nature of their study. That said, it’s good for people […] The post Taking responsibility for your statistical conclusions: You must decide what variation to…

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