Posts Tagged ‘ Sociology ’

Where’d the $2500 come from?

June 17, 2017
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Brad Buchsbaum writes: Sometimes I read the New York Times “Well” articles on science and health. It’s a mixed bag, sometimes it’s quite good and sometimes not. I came across this yesterday: What’s the Value of Exercise? $2,500 For people still struggling to make time for exercise, a new study offers a strong incentive: You’ll […] The post Where’d the $2500 come from? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Criminology corner: Type M error might explain Weisburd’s Paradox

June 12, 2017
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[silly cartoon found by googling *cat burglar*] Torbjørn Skardhamar, Mikko Aaltonen, and I wrote this article to appear in the Journal of Quantitative Criminology: Simple calculations seem to show that larger studies should have higher statistical power, but empirical meta-analyses of published work in criminology have found zero or weak correlations between sample size and […] The post Criminology corner: Type M error might explain Weisburd’s Paradox appeared first on…

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“Bombshell” statistical evidence for research misconduct, and what to do about it?

June 8, 2017
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Someone pointed me to this post by Nick Brown discussing a recent article by John Carlisle regarding scientific misconduct. Here’s Brown: [Carlisle] claims that he has found statistical evidence that a surprisingly high proportion of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) contain data patterns that cannot have arisen by chance. . . . the implication is that […] The post “Bombshell” statistical evidence for research misconduct, and what to do about it?…

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All the things we have to do that we don’t really need to do: The social cost of junk science

May 28, 2017
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I’ve been thinking a lot about junk science lately. Some people have said it’s counterproductive or rude of me to keep talking about the same few examples (actually I think we have about 15 or so examples that come up again and again), so let me just speak generically about the sort of scientific claim […] The post All the things we have to do that we don’t really need…

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The Other Side of the Night

May 24, 2017
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The Other Side of the Night

Don Green points us to this quantitative/qualitative meta-analysis he did with Betsy Levy Paluck and Seth Green. The paper begins: This paper evaluates the state of contact hypothesis research from a policy perspective. Building on Pettigrew and Tropp’s (2006) influential meta-analysis, we assemble all intergroup contact studies that feature random assignment and delayed outcome measures, […] The post The Other Side of the Night appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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PCI Statistics: A preprint review peer community in statistics

May 24, 2017
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PCI Statistics:  A preprint review peer community in statistics

X informs me of a new effort, “Peer community in . . .”, which describes itself as “a free recommendation process of published and unpublished scientific papers.” So far this exists in only one field, Evolutionary Biology. But this looks like a great idea and I expect it will soon exist in statistics, political science, […] The post PCI Statistics: A preprint review peer community in statistics appeared first on…

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How to think scientifically about scientists’ proposals for fixing science

May 22, 2017
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I wrote this article for a sociology journal: Science is in crisis. Any doubt about this status has surely been been dispelled by the loud assurances to the contrary by various authority figures who are deeply invested in the current system and have written things such as, “Psychology is not in crisis, contrary to popular […] The post How to think scientifically about scientists’ proposals for fixing science appeared first…

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My review of Duncan Watts’s book, “Everything is Obvious (once you know the answer)”

May 18, 2017
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We had some recent discussion of this book in the comments and so I thought I’d point you to my review from a few years ago. Lots to chew on in the book, and in the review. The post My review of Duncan Watts’s book, “Everything is Ob...

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“P-hacking” and the intention-to-cheat effect

May 10, 2017
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I’m a big fan of the work of Uri Simonsohn and his collaborators, but I don’t like the term “p-hacking” because it can be taken to imply an intention to cheat. The image of p-hacking is of a researcher trying test after test on the data until reaching the magic “p less than .05.” But, […] The post “P-hacking” and the intention-to-cheat effect appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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“Everybody Lies” by Seth Stephens-Davidowitz

May 10, 2017
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Seth Stephens-Davidowitz sent me his new book on learning from data. As is just about always the case for this sort of book, I’m a natural reviewer but I’m not really the intended audience. That’s why I gave Dan Ariely’s book to Juli Simon Thomas to review; I thought her perspective would be more relevant […] The post “Everybody Lies” by Seth Stephens-Davidowitz appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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