Posts Tagged ‘ Sociology ’

“We can keep debating this after 11 years, but I’m sure we all have much more pressing things to do (grants? papers? family time? attacking 11-year-old papers by former classmates? guitar practice?)”

July 28, 2015
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Someone pointed me to this discussion by Lior Pachter of a controversial claim in biology. The statistics The statistical content has to do with a biology paper by M. Kellis, B. W. Birren, and E.S. Lander from 2004 that contains the following passage: Strikingly, 95% of cases of accelerated evolution involve only one member of […] The post “We can keep debating this after 11 years, but I’m sure we…

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“17 Baby Names You Didn’t Know Were Totally Made Up”

July 19, 2015
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From Laura Wattenberg: Want to drive the baby-naming public up the wall? Tell them you’re naming your daughter Renesmee. Author Stephenie Meyer invented the name for the half-vampire child in her wildly popular Twilight series. In the story it’s simply an homage to the child’s two grandmothers, Renee and Esmé. To the traditional-minded, though, Renesmee […] The post “17 Baby Names You Didn’t Know Were Totally Made Up” appeared first…

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Survey weighting and regression modeling

July 14, 2015
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Yphtach Lelkes points us to a recent article on survey weighting by three economists, Gary Solon, Steven Haider, and Jeffrey Wooldridge, who write: We start by distinguishing two purposes of estimation: to estimate population descriptive statistics and to estimate causal effects. In the former type of research, weighting is called for when it is needed […] The post Survey weighting and regression modeling appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Inauthentic leadership? Development and validation of methods-based criticism

July 11, 2015
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Thomas Basbøll writes: I need some help with a critique of a paper that is part of the apparently growing retraction scandal in leadership studies. Here’s Retraction Watch. The paper I want to look at is here: “Authentic Leadership: Development and Validation of a Theory-Based Measure” By F. O. Walumbwa, B. J. Avolio, W. L. […] The post Inauthentic leadership? Development and validation of methods-based criticism appeared first on Statistical…

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Hey, what’s up with that x-axis??

June 22, 2015
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Hey, what’s up with that x-axis??

CDC should know better. P.S. In comments, Zachary David supplies this correctly-scaled version: It would be better to label the lines directly than to use a legend, and the y-axis is off by a factor of 100, but I can hardly complain given that he just whipped this graph up for us. The real point […] The post Hey, what’s up with that x-axis?? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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Born-open data

June 17, 2015
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Born-open data

Jeff Rouder writes: Although many researchers agree that scientific data should be open to scrutiny to ferret out poor analyses and outright fraud, most raw data sets are not available on demand. There are many reasons researchers do not open their data, and one is technical. It is often time consuming to prepare and archive […] The post Born-open data appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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The language of insignificance

June 13, 2015
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Jonathan Falk points me to an amusing post by Matthew Hankins giving synonyms for “not statistically significant.” Hankins writes: The following list is culled from peer-reviewed journal articles in which (a) the authors set themselves the threshold of 0.05 for significance, (b) failed to achieve that threshold value for p and (c) described it in […] The post The language of insignificance appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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Of buggy whips and moral hazards; or, Sympathy for the Aapor

June 3, 2015
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Of buggy whips and moral hazards; or, Sympathy for the Aapor

We’ve talked before about those dark-ages classical survey sampling types who say you can’t do poop with opt-in samples. The funny thing is, these people do all sorts of adjustment themselves, in the sampling or in post-data weighting or both, to deal with the inevitable fact that the people you can actually reach when you […] The post Of buggy whips and moral hazards; or, Sympathy for the Aapor appeared…

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“With that assurance, a scientist can report his or her work to the public, and the public can trust the work.”

May 30, 2015
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Dan Wright writes: Given your healthy skepticism of findings/conclusions from post-peer-reviewed papers, I thought I would forward the following from Institute of Educational Sciences. Here is a sample quote: Simply put, peer review is a method by which scientists who are experts in a particular field examine another scientist’s work to verify that it makes […] The post “With that assurance, a scientist can report his or her work to…

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An inundation of significance tests

May 25, 2015
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An inundation of significance tests

Jan Vanhove writes: The last three research papers I’ve read contained 51, 49 and 70 significance tests (counting conservatively), and to the extent that I’m able to see the forest for the trees, mostly poorly motivated ones. I wonder what the motivation behind this deluge of tests is. Is it wanton obfuscation (seems unlikely), a […] The post An inundation of significance tests appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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