Posts Tagged ‘ Sociology ’

Hey, what’s up with that x-axis??

June 22, 2015
By
Hey, what’s up with that x-axis??

CDC should know better. P.S. In comments, Zachary David supplies this correctly-scaled version: It would be better to label the lines directly than to use a legend, and the y-axis is off by a factor of 100, but I can hardly complain given that he just whipped this graph up for us. The real point […] The post Hey, what’s up with that x-axis?? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

Read more »

Born-open data

June 17, 2015
By
Born-open data

Jeff Rouder writes: Although many researchers agree that scientific data should be open to scrutiny to ferret out poor analyses and outright fraud, most raw data sets are not available on demand. There are many reasons researchers do not open their data, and one is technical. It is often time consuming to prepare and archive […] The post Born-open data appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

Read more »

The language of insignificance

June 13, 2015
By

Jonathan Falk points me to an amusing post by Matthew Hankins giving synonyms for “not statistically significant.” Hankins writes: The following list is culled from peer-reviewed journal articles in which (a) the authors set themselves the threshold of 0.05 for significance, (b) failed to achieve that threshold value for p and (c) described it in […] The post The language of insignificance appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

Read more »

Of buggy whips and moral hazards; or, Sympathy for the Aapor

June 3, 2015
By
Of buggy whips and moral hazards; or, Sympathy for the Aapor

We’ve talked before about those dark-ages classical survey sampling types who say you can’t do poop with opt-in samples. The funny thing is, these people do all sorts of adjustment themselves, in the sampling or in post-data weighting or both, to deal with the inevitable fact that the people you can actually reach when you […] The post Of buggy whips and moral hazards; or, Sympathy for the Aapor appeared…

Read more »

“With that assurance, a scientist can report his or her work to the public, and the public can trust the work.”

May 30, 2015
By

Dan Wright writes: Given your healthy skepticism of findings/conclusions from post-peer-reviewed papers, I thought I would forward the following from Institute of Educational Sciences. Here is a sample quote: Simply put, peer review is a method by which scientists who are experts in a particular field examine another scientist’s work to verify that it makes […] The post “With that assurance, a scientist can report his or her work to…

Read more »

An inundation of significance tests

May 25, 2015
By
An inundation of significance tests

Jan Vanhove writes: The last three research papers I’ve read contained 51, 49 and 70 significance tests (counting conservatively), and to the extent that I’m able to see the forest for the trees, mostly poorly motivated ones. I wonder what the motivation behind this deluge of tests is. Is it wanton obfuscation (seems unlikely), a […] The post An inundation of significance tests appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

Read more »

Chess + statistics + plagiarism, again!

May 24, 2015
By
Chess + statistics + plagiarism, again!

In response to this post (in which I noted that the Elo chess rating system is a static model which, paradoxically, is used to for the purposes of studying changes), Keith Knight writes: It’s notable that Glickman’s work is related to some research by Harry Joe at UBC, which in turn was inspired by data […] The post Chess + statistics + plagiarism, again! appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

Read more »

Creativity is the ability to see relationships where none exist

May 22, 2015
By
Creativity is the ability to see relationships where none exist

Brent Goldfarb and Andrew King, in a paper to appear in the journal Strategic Management, write: In a recent issue of this journal, Bettis (2012) reports a conversation with a graduate student who forthrightly announced that he had been trained by faculty to “search for asterisks”. The student explained that he sifted through large databases […] The post Creativity is the ability to see relationships where none exist appeared first…

Read more »

I actually think this infographic is ok

May 15, 2015
By

Under the heading, “bad charts,” Mark Duckenfield links to this display by Quoctrung Bui and writes: So much to go with here, but I [Duckenfield] would just highlight the bars as the most egregious problem as it is implied that the same number of people are in each category. Obviously that is not the case […] The post I actually think this infographic is ok appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

Read more »

Collaborative filtering, hierarchical modeling, and . . . speed dating

May 10, 2015
By
Collaborative filtering, hierarchical modeling, and . . . speed dating

Jonah Sinick posted a few things on the famous speed-dating dataset and writes: The main element that I seem to have been missing is principal component analysis of the different rating types. The basic situation is that the first PC is something that people are roughly equally responsive to, while people vary a lot with […] The post Collaborative filtering, hierarchical modeling, and . . . speed dating appeared first…

Read more »


Subscribe

Email:

  Subscribe