Posts Tagged ‘ Sociology ’

Taking perspective on perspective taking

April 16, 2018
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Gabor Simonovits writes: I thought you might be interested in this paper with Gabor Kezdi of U Michigan and Peter Kardos of Bloomfield College, about an online intervention reducing anti-Roma prejudice and far-right voting in Hungary through a role-playing game. The paper is similar to some existing social psychology studies on perspective taking but we […] The post Taking perspective on perspective taking appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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“Bit by Bit: Social Research in the Digital Age”

April 14, 2018
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Our longtime collaborator Matt Salganik sent me a copy of his new textbook, “Bit by Bit: Social Research in the Digital Age.” I really like the division into Observing Behavior, Asking Questions, Running Experiments, and Mass Collaboration (I’d remove the word “Creating” from the title of that section). It seemed awkward for Ethics to be […] The post “Bit by Bit: Social Research in the Digital Age” appeared first on…

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Tools for detecting junk science? Transparency is the key.

April 12, 2018
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Tools for detecting junk science?  Transparency is the key.

In an article to appear in the journal Child Development, “Distinguishing polemic from commentary in science,” physicist David Grimes and psychologist Dorothy Bishop write: Exposure to nonionizing radiation used in wireless communication remains a contentious topic in the public mind—while the overwhelming scientific evidence to date suggests that microwave and radio frequencies used in modern […] The post Tools for detecting junk science? Transparency is the key. appeared first on…

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A possible defense of cargo cult science?

April 8, 2018
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Someone writes: I’ve been a follower of your blog and your continual coverage of “cargo cult science”. Since this type of science tends to be more influential and common than the (idealized) non-“cargo cult” stuff, I’ve been trying to find ways of reassuring myself that this type of science isn’t a bad thing (because if […] The post A possible defense of cargo cult science? appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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The all-important distinction between truth and evidence

April 6, 2018
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The all-important distinction between truth and evidence

Yesterday we discussed a sad but all-too-familiar story of a little research project that got published and hyped beyond recognition. The published paper was called, “The more you play, the more aggressive you become: A long-term experimental study of cumulative violent video game effects on hostile expectations and aggressive behavior,” but actually that title was […] The post The all-important distinction between truth and evidence appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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More bad news in the scientific literature: A 3-day study is called “long term,” and nobody even seems to notice the problem. Whassup with that??

April 5, 2018
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More bad news in the scientific literature:  A 3-day study is called “long term,”  and nobody even seems to notice the problem.  Whassup with that??

Someone pointed me to this article, “The more you play, the more aggressive you become: A long-term experimental study of cumulative violent video game effects on hostile expectations and aggressive behavior,” by Youssef Hasan, Laurent Bègue, Michael Scharkow, and Brad Bushman. My correspondent was suspicious of the error bars in Figure 1. I actually think […] The post More bad news in the scientific literature: A 3-day study is called…

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Does adding women to corporate boards increase stock price?

April 3, 2018
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Anton Kasster writes: I recently came across a study which I think is quite questionable, even ridiculous. This study is unfortunately quite old (2012), but its conclusions are so ludicrous that the study is perhaps still interesting. The study claims that companies with women in their supervisory boards perform better than companies without a woman […] The post Does adding women to corporate boards increase stock price? appeared first on…

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Yet another IRB horror story

March 29, 2018
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The IRB (institutional review board) is this weird bureaucracy, often staffed by helpful and well-meaning people but generally out of control, as it operates on an if-it’s-not-allowed-it’s-forbidden principle. As an example, Jonathan Falk points us to this Kafkaesque story from Scott Alexander, which ends up like this: Faced with submitting twenty-seven new pieces of paperwork […] The post Yet another IRB horror story appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Spatial patterns in crime: Where’s he gonna strike next?

March 26, 2018
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Wouter Steenbeek writes: I am a criminologist and mostly do spatial analyses of crime patterns: where does crime occur and why in these neighborhoods / at these locations, and so on. Currently, I am thinking about offender decision-making behavior, specifically his ‘location choice’ of where to offend. Hey, how about criminologists instead of looking to […] The post Spatial patterns in crime: Where’s he gonna strike next? appeared first on…

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Some of the data from the NRA conventions and firearm injuries study

March 23, 2018
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Dave Kane writes: You wrote about the NRA conventions and firearm injuries study here. The lead author, Anupam Jena, kindly provided some of the underlying data and a snippet of the code they used to me. You can see it all here. The data are here. I [Kane] wrote up a brief analysis, R Markdown […] The post Some of the data from the NRA conventions and firearm injuries study…

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