Posts Tagged ‘ Sociology ’

Things that sound good but aren’t quite right: Art and research edition

August 19, 2016
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There are a lot of things you can say that sound very sensible but, upon reflection, are missing something. For example consider this blog comment from Chris G: Years ago I heard someone suggest these three questions for assessing a work of art: 1. What was the artist attempting to do? 2. Were they successful? […] The post Things that sound good but aren’t quite right: Art and research edition…

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An ethnographic study of the “open evidential culture” of research psychology

August 18, 2016
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Claude Fischer points me to this paper by David Peterson, “The Baby Factory: Difficult Research Objects, Disciplinary Standards, and the Production of Statistical Significance,” which begins: Science studies scholars have shown that the management of natural complexity in lab settings is accomplished through a mixture of technological standardization and tacit knowledge by lab workers. Yet […] The post An ethnographic study of the “open evidential culture” of research psychology appeared…

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Tax Day: The Birthday Dog That Didn’t Bark

August 15, 2016
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Tax Day:  The Birthday Dog That Didn’t Bark

Following up on Valentine’s Day and April Fools, a journalist was asking about April 15: Are there fewer babies born on Tax Day than on neighboring days? Let’s go to the data: These are data from 1968-1988 so it would certainly be interesting to see new data, but here’s what we got: – April 1st […] The post Tax Day: The Birthday Dog That Didn’t Bark appeared first on Statistical…

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Science reporters are getting the picture

August 13, 2016
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Enrico Schaar points me to two news articles: What psychology’s crisis means for the future of science by Brian Resnick and These doctors want to fix a huge problem with drug trials. Why isn’t anyone listening? by Julia Belluz. I don’t really have anything to add here beyond what I’ve blogged on these topics before. […] The post Science reporters are getting the picture appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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“What can recent replication failures tell us about the theoretical commitments of psychology?”

August 6, 2016
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“What can recent replication failures tell us about the theoretical commitments of psychology?”

Psychology/philosophy professor Stan Klein was motivated by our power pose discussion to send along this article which seems to me to be a worthy entry in what I’ve lately been calling “the literature of exasperation,” following in the tradition of Meehl etc. I offer one minor correction. Klein writes, “I have no doubt that the […] The post “What can recent replication failures tell us about the theoretical commitments of…

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In policing (and elsewhere), regional variation in behavior can be huge, and perhaps give a clue about how to move forward.

August 3, 2016
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Rajiv Sethi points to a discussion of Peter Moskos on the recent controversy over racial bias in police shootings. Here’s Sethi: Moskos is not arguing here that the police can do no wrong; he is arguing instead that in the aggregate, whites and blacks are about equally likely to be victims of bad shootings. . […] The post In policing (and elsewhere), regional variation in behavior can be huge, and…

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Even social scientists can think like pundits, unfortunately

July 31, 2016
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I regularly read the Orgtheory blog which has interesting perspectives from sociologists. Today I saw this, from Sean Safford: I [Safford] actually hold to the idea that the winning candidate for President is always the one who has a clearer view of the challenges and opportunities facing the country and articulates a viable roadmap for […] The post Even social scientists can think like pundits, unfortunately appeared first on Statistical…

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What makes a mathematical formula beautiful?

July 27, 2016
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What makes a mathematical formula beautiful?

Hiro Minato pointed me to this paper (hyped here) by Semir Zeki, John Romaya, Dionigi Benincasa, and Michael Atiyah on “The experience of mathematical beauty and its neural correlates,” who report: We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to image the activity in the brains of 15 mathematicians when they viewed mathematical formulae which they […] The post What makes a mathematical formula beautiful? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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More evidence that even top researchers routinely misinterpret p-values

July 26, 2016
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More evidence that even top researchers routinely misinterpret p-values

Blake McShane writes: I wanted to write to you about something related to your ongoing posts on replication in psychology as well as your recent post the ASA statement on p-values. In addition to the many problems you and others have documented with the p-value as a measure of evidence (both those computed “honestly” and […] The post More evidence that even top researchers routinely misinterpret p-values appeared first on…

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Ioannidis: “Evidence-Based Medicine Has Been Hijacked”

July 21, 2016
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The celebrated medical-research reformer has a new paper (sent to me by Keith O’Rourke; official published version here), where he writes: As EBM [evidence-based medicine] became more influential, it was also hijacked to serve agendas different from what it originally aimed for. Influential randomized trials are largely done by and for the benefit of the […] The post Ioannidis: “Evidence-Based Medicine Has Been Hijacked” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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