Posts Tagged ‘ Sociology ’

I actually think this infographic is ok

May 15, 2015
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Under the heading, “bad charts,” Mark Duckenfield links to this display by Quoctrung Bui and writes: So much to go with here, but I [Duckenfield] would just highlight the bars as the most egregious problem as it is implied that the same number of people are in each category. Obviously that is not the case […] The post I actually think this infographic is ok appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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Collaborative filtering, hierarchical modeling, and . . . speed dating

May 10, 2015
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Collaborative filtering, hierarchical modeling, and . . . speed dating

Jonah Sinick posted a few things on the famous speed-dating dataset and writes: The main element that I seem to have been missing is principal component analysis of the different rating types. The basic situation is that the first PC is something that people are roughly equally responsive to, while people vary a lot with […] The post Collaborative filtering, hierarchical modeling, and . . . speed dating appeared first…

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Social networks spread disease—but they also spread practices that reduce disease

May 9, 2015
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Social networks spread disease—but they also spread practices that reduce disease

I recently posted on the sister blog regarding a paper by Jon Zelner, James Trostle, Jason Goldstick, William Cevallos, James House, and Joseph Eisenberg, “Social Connectedness and Disease Transmission: Social Organization, Cohesion, Village Context, and Infection Risk in Rural Ecuador.” Zelner follows up: This made me think of my favorite figure from this paper, which […] The post Social networks spread disease—but they also spread practices that reduce disease appeared…

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What I got wrong (and right) about econometrics and unbiasedness

May 8, 2015
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Yesterday I spoke at the Princeton economics department. The title of my talk was: “Unbiasedness”: You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means. The talk went all right—people seemed ok with what I was saying—but I didn’t see a lot of audience involvement. It was a bit […] The post What I got wrong (and right) about econometrics and unbiasedness appeared first…

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In criticism of criticism of criticism

May 6, 2015
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In criticism of criticism of criticism

I do a lot of criticism. I’m sure you can think of lots of things that I like to criticize, but to keep things simple, let’s focus on graphics criticism, for example this post where I criticized a graph for false parallelism. At this point some people would say that graphics criticism is mean, and […] The post In criticism of criticism of criticism appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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Inventor of Arxiv speaks at Columbia this Tues 4pm

May 4, 2015
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Paul Ginsparg, professor of physics at Cornell University and inventor of Arxiv, is speaking Tuesday 5 May, 4pm in CEPSR 750. Here’s the abstract: I [Ginsparg] will give a very brief sociological overview of the current metastable state of scholarly research communication, and then a technical discussion of the practical implications of literature and usage […] The post Inventor of Arxiv speaks at Columbia this Tues 4pm appeared first on…

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There are 6 ways to get rejected from PLOS: (1) theft, (2) sexual harassment, (3) running an experiment without a control group, (4) keeping a gambling addict away from the casino, (5) chapter 11 bankruptcy proceedings, and (6) having no male co-authors

April 30, 2015
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This story is pretty horrifying/funny. But the strangest thing was this part: [The author] and her colleague have appealed to the unnamed journal, which belongs to the PLoS family . . . I thought PLOS published just about everything! This is not a slam on PLOS. Arxiv publishes everything too, and Arxiv is great. The […] The post There are 6 ways to get rejected from PLOS: (1) theft, (2)…

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What’s the most important thing in statistics that’s not in the textbooks?

April 28, 2015
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What’s the most important thing in statistics that’s not in the textbooks?

As I wrote a couple years ago: Statistics does not require randomness. The three essential elements of statistics are measurement, comparison, and variation. Randomness is one way to supply variation, and it’s one way to model variation, but it’s not necessary. Nor is it necessary to have “true” randomness (of the dice-throwing or urn-sampling variety) […] The post What’s the most important thing in statistics that’s not in the textbooks?…

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Political Attitudes in Social Environments

April 23, 2015
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Jose Duarte, Jarret Crawford, Charlotta Stern, Jonathan Haidt, Lee Jussim, and Philip Tetlock wrote an article, “Political Diversity Will Improve Social Psychological Science,” in which the argued that the field of social psychology would benefit from the inclusion of more non-liberal voices (here I’m using “liberal” in the sense of current U.S. politics). Duarte et […] The post Political Attitudes in Social Environments appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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How do data and experiments fit into a scientific research program?

April 18, 2015
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I was talking with someone today about various “dead on arrival” research programs we’ve been discussing here for the past few years: I’m talking about topics such beauty and sex ratios of children, or ovulation and voting, or ESP—all of which possibly represent real phenomena and could possibly be studied in a productive way, just […] The post How do data and experiments fit into a scientific research program? appeared…

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