Posts Tagged ‘ Sociology ’

How to think scientifically about scientists’ proposals for fixing science

May 22, 2017
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I wrote this article for a sociology journal: Science is in crisis. Any doubt about this status has surely been been dispelled by the loud assurances to the contrary by various authority figures who are deeply invested in the current system and have written things such as, “Psychology is not in crisis, contrary to popular […] The post How to think scientifically about scientists’ proposals for fixing science appeared first…

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My review of Duncan Watts’s book, “Everything is Obvious (once you know the answer)”

May 18, 2017
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We had some recent discussion of this book in the comments and so I thought I’d point you to my review from a few years ago. Lots to chew on in the book, and in the review. The post My review of Duncan Watts’s book, “Everything is Ob...

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“P-hacking” and the intention-to-cheat effect

May 10, 2017
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I’m a big fan of the work of Uri Simonsohn and his collaborators, but I don’t like the term “p-hacking” because it can be taken to imply an intention to cheat. The image of p-hacking is of a researcher trying test after test on the data until reaching the magic “p less than .05.” But, […] The post “P-hacking” and the intention-to-cheat effect appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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“Everybody Lies” by Seth Stephens-Davidowitz

May 10, 2017
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Seth Stephens-Davidowitz sent me his new book on learning from data. As is just about always the case for this sort of book, I’m a natural reviewer but I’m not really the intended audience. That’s why I gave Dan Ariely’s book to Juli Simon Thomas to review; I thought her perspective would be more relevant […] The post “Everybody Lies” by Seth Stephens-Davidowitz appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Honesty and transparency are not enough

May 9, 2017
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[cat picture] From a recent article, Honesty and transparency are not enough: This point . . . is important for two reasons. First, consider the practical consequences for a researcher who eagerly accepts the message of ethical and practical values of sharing and openness, but does not learn about the importance of data quality. He […] The post Honesty and transparency are not enough appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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“An anonymous tip”

May 9, 2017
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[cat picture] I and a couple others received the following bizarre email: **’s research is just the tip of the iceberg. If you want to expose more serious flaws, look at research by his co-authors – ** at ** and ** at **. I won’t be checking this disposable e-mail address again. People send me […] The post “An anonymous tip” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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Discussion with Lee Jussim and Simine Vazire on eminence, junk science, and blind reviewing

May 7, 2017
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Lee Jussim pointed me to the recent article in Psychological Science by Joseph Simmons and Uri Simonsohn, expanding on their blog post on flaws in the notorious power pose article. Jussim then commented: I [Jussim] think that Cuddy/Fiske world is slowly shrinking. I think your “What Has Happened Here…” post was: 1. A bit premature […] The post Discussion with Lee Jussim and Simine Vazire on eminence, junk science, and…

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A completely reasonable-sounding statement with which I strongly disagree

May 5, 2017
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From a couple years ago: In the context of a listserv discussion about replication in psychology experiments, someone wrote: The current best estimate of the effect size is somewhere in between the original study and the replication’s reported value. This conciliatory, split-the-difference statement sounds reasonable, and it might well represent good politics in the context […] The post A completely reasonable-sounding statement with which I strongly disagree appeared first on…

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7th graders trained to avoid Pizzagate-style data exploration—but is the training too rigid?

May 5, 2017
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[cat picture] Laura Kapitula writes: I wanted to share a cute story that gave me a bit of hope. My daughter who is in 7th grade was doing her science project. She had designed an experiment comparing lemon batteries to potato batteries, a 2×4 design with lemons or potatoes as one factor and number of […] The post 7th graders trained to avoid Pizzagate-style data exploration—but is the training too…

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Another perspective on peer review

May 1, 2017
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Andrew Preston writes: I’m the co-founder and CEO of Publons.com. Our mission is to modernise peer review. We’ve developed a way to give researchers formal recognition for their peer review (i.e., evidence that can go on your CV) and have partnerships with over 1k top journals. I’ve just finished reading your rebuttal of Susan Fiske’s […] The post Another perspective on peer review appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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