Posts Tagged ‘ Sociology ’

“Estimating trends in mortality for the bottom quartile, we found little evidence that survival probabilities declined dramatically.”

January 19, 2017
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“Estimating trends in mortality for the bottom quartile, we found little evidence that survival probabilities declined dramatically.”

Last year there was much discussion here and elsewhere about a paper by Anne Case and Angus Deaton, who noticed that death rates for non-Hispanic white Americans aged 45-54 had been roughly flat since 1999, even while the death rates for this age category had been declining steadily in other countries and among nonwhite Americans. […] The post “Estimating trends in mortality for the bottom quartile, we found little evidence…

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Powerpose update

January 16, 2017
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Powerpose update

I contacted Anna Dreber, one of the authors of the paper that failed to replicate power pose, and asked her about a particular question that came up regarding their replication study. One of the authors of the original power pose study wrote that the replication “varied methodologically in about a dozen ways — some of […] The post Powerpose update appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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When do stories work, Process tracing, and Connections between qualitative and quantitative research

January 11, 2017
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When do stories work, Process tracing, and Connections between qualitative and quantitative research

Jonathan Stray writes: I read your “when do stories work” paper (with Thomas Basbøll) with interest—as a journalist stories are of course central to my field. I wondered if you had encountered the “process tracing” literature in political science? It attempts to make sense of stories as “case studies” and there’s a nice logic of […] The post When do stories work, Process tracing, and Connections between qualitative and quantitative…

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Confirmation bias

January 9, 2017
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Confirmation bias

Shravan Vasishth is unimpressed by this evidence that was given to support the claim that being bilingual postpones symptoms of dementia: My reaction: Seems like there could be some selection issues, no? Shravan: Also, low sample size, and confirming what she already believes. I would be more impressed if she found evidence against the bilingual […] The post Confirmation bias appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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The Lure of Luxury

January 8, 2017
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The Lure of Luxury

From the sister blog, a response to an article by psychologist Paul Bloom on why people own things they don’t really need: Paul Bloom argues that humans dig deep, look beyond the surface, and attend to the nonobvious in ways that add to our pleasure and appreciation of the world of objects. I [Susan] wholly […] The post The Lure of Luxury appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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About that claim in the Monkey Cage that North Korea had “moderate” electoral integrity . . .

January 3, 2017
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Yesterday I wrote about problems with the Electoral Integrity Project, a set of expert surveys that are intended to “evaluate the state of the world’s elections” but have some problems, notably rating more than half of the U.S. states in 2016 as having lower integrity than Cuba (!) and North Korea (!!!) in 2014. I […] The post About that claim in the Monkey Cage that North Korea had “moderate”…

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Migration explaining observed changes in mortality rate in different geographic areas?

January 2, 2017
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We know that the much-discussed increase in mortality among middle-aged U.S. whites is mostly happening among women in the south. In response to some of that discussion, Tim Worstall wrote: I [Worstall] have a speculative answer. It is absolutely speculative: but it is also checkable to some extent. Really, I’m channelling my usual critique of […] The post Migration explaining observed changes in mortality rate in different geographic areas? appeared…

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Transformative treatments

December 31, 2016
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Transformative treatments

Kieran Healy and Laurie Paul wrote a new article, “Transformative Treatments,” (see also here) which reminds me a bit of my article with Guido, “Why ask why? Forward causal inference and reverse causal questions.” Healy and Paul’s article begins: Contemporary social-scientific research seeks to identify specific causal mechanisms for outcomes of theoretical interest. Experiments that […] The post Transformative treatments appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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“I thought it would be most unfortunate if a lab . . . wasted time and effort trying to replicate our results.”

December 29, 2016
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“I thought it would be most unfortunate if a lab . . . wasted time and effort trying to replicate our results.”

Mark Palko points us to this news article by George Dvorsky: A Harvard research team led by biologist Douglas Melton has retracted a promising research paper following multiple failed attempts to reproduce the original findings. . . . In June 2016, the authors published an article in the open access journal PLOS One stating that […] The post “I thought it would be most unfortunate if a lab . .…

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Ethics and statistics

December 27, 2016
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For a few years now, I’ve been writing a column in Chance. Below are the articles so far. This is by no means an exhaustive list of my writings on ethics and statistics but at least I thought it could help to collect these columns in one place. Ethics and statistics: Open data and open […] The post Ethics and statistics appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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