Posts Tagged ‘ Sociology ’

A political sociological course on statistics for high school students

August 27, 2015
By

Ben Frisch writes: I am designing a semester long non-AP Statistics course for high school juniors and seniors. I am wondering if you had some advice for the design of my class. My currentthinking for the design of the class includes: 0) Brief introduction to R/ R Studio and descriptive statistics and data sheet structure. […] The post A political sociological course on statistics for high school students appeared first…

Read more »

Rockin the tabloids

August 16, 2015
By

Rick Gerkin points me to this opinion piece from a couple years ago by biologist Randy Schekman, titled “How journals like Nature, Cell and Science are damaging science” and subtitled “The incentives offered by top journals distort science, just as big bonuses distort banking.” Here’s Schekman: The prevailing structures of personal reputation and career advancement […] The post Rockin the tabloids appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

Read more »

Hey—Don’t trust anything coming from the Tri-Valley Center for Human Potential!

August 13, 2015
By

Shravan sends along this article by Douglas Peters and Stephen Ceci, who report: We selected 12 already published research articles by investigators from prestigious and highly productive American psychology departments, one article from each of 12 highly regarded and widely read American psychology journals with high rejection rates (80%) and nonblind refereeing practices. With fictitious […] The post Hey—Don’t trust anything coming from the Tri-Valley Center for Human Potential! appeared…

Read more »

It’s hard to replicate (that is, duplicate) analyses in sociology

August 12, 2015
By

Cristobal Young points us to this post on replication packages; he writes, “we found that only 28% of sociologists would/could provide a replication package.” I read the comments. The topic arouses a lot of passion. Some of the commenters are pretty rude! And, yes, I’m glad to see this post, given my own frustrating experience […] The post It’s hard to replicate (that is, duplicate) analyses in sociology appeared first…

Read more »

Monte Carlo and the Holy Grail

August 9, 2015
By
Monte Carlo and the Holy Grail

On 31 Dec 2010, someone wrote in: A British Bayesian curiosity: Adrian Smith has just been knighted, and so becomes Sir Adrian. He can’t be the first Bayesian knight, as Harold Jeffreys was Sir Harold. I replied by pointing to this discussion from 2008, and adding: Perhaps Spiegelhalter can be knighted next. Or maybe Ripley! […] The post Monte Carlo and the Holy Grail appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

Read more »

“We can keep debating this after 11 years, but I’m sure we all have much more pressing things to do (grants? papers? family time? attacking 11-year-old papers by former classmates? guitar practice?)”

July 28, 2015
By

Someone pointed me to this discussion by Lior Pachter of a controversial claim in biology. The statistics The statistical content has to do with a biology paper by M. Kellis, B. W. Birren, and E.S. Lander from 2004 that contains the following passage: Strikingly, 95% of cases of accelerated evolution involve only one member of […] The post “We can keep debating this after 11 years, but I’m sure we…

Read more »

“17 Baby Names You Didn’t Know Were Totally Made Up”

July 19, 2015
By

From Laura Wattenberg: Want to drive the baby-naming public up the wall? Tell them you’re naming your daughter Renesmee. Author Stephenie Meyer invented the name for the half-vampire child in her wildly popular Twilight series. In the story it’s simply an homage to the child’s two grandmothers, Renee and Esmé. To the traditional-minded, though, Renesmee […] The post “17 Baby Names You Didn’t Know Were Totally Made Up” appeared first…

Read more »

Survey weighting and regression modeling

July 14, 2015
By

Yphtach Lelkes points us to a recent article on survey weighting by three economists, Gary Solon, Steven Haider, and Jeffrey Wooldridge, who write: We start by distinguishing two purposes of estimation: to estimate population descriptive statistics and to estimate causal effects. In the former type of research, weighting is called for when it is needed […] The post Survey weighting and regression modeling appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

Read more »

Inauthentic leadership? Development and validation of methods-based criticism

July 11, 2015
By

Thomas Basbøll writes: I need some help with a critique of a paper that is part of the apparently growing retraction scandal in leadership studies. Here’s Retraction Watch. The paper I want to look at is here: “Authentic Leadership: Development and Validation of a Theory-Based Measure” By F. O. Walumbwa, B. J. Avolio, W. L. […] The post Inauthentic leadership? Development and validation of methods-based criticism appeared first on Statistical…

Read more »

Hey, what’s up with that x-axis??

June 22, 2015
By
Hey, what’s up with that x-axis??

CDC should know better. P.S. In comments, Zachary David supplies this correctly-scaled version: It would be better to label the lines directly than to use a legend, and the y-axis is off by a factor of 100, but I can hardly complain given that he just whipped this graph up for us. The real point […] The post Hey, what’s up with that x-axis?? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

Read more »


Subscribe

Email:

  Subscribe