Posts Tagged ‘ Sociology ’

Bad Statistics: Ignore or Call Out?

September 1, 2014
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Evelyn Lamb adds to the conversation that Jeff Leek and I had a few months ago. It’s a topic that’s worth returning to, in light of our continuing discussions regarding the crisis of criticism in science. The post Bad Statistics: Ignore or...

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Avoiding model selection in Bayesian social research

August 29, 2014
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One of my favorites, from 1995. Don Rubin and I argue with Adrian Raftery. Here’s how we begin: Raftery’s paper addresses two important problems in the statistical analysis of social science data: (1) choosing an appropriate model when so much data are available that standard P-values reject all parsimonious models; and (2) making estimates and […] The post Avoiding model selection in Bayesian social research appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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When we talk about the “file drawer,” let’s not assume that an experiment can easily be characterized as producing strong, mixed, or weak results

August 28, 2014
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Neil Malhotra: I thought you might be interested in our paper [the paper is by Annie Franco, Neil Malhotra, and Gabor Simonovits, and the link is to a news article by Jeffrey Mervis], forthcoming in Science, about publication bias in the social sciences given your interest and work on research transparency. Basic summary: We examined […] The post When we talk about the “file drawer,” let’s not assume that an…

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Replication Wiki for economics

August 22, 2014
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Jan Hoeffler of the University of Gottingen writes: I have been working on a replication project funded by the Institute for New Economic Thinking during the last two years and read several of your blog posts that touched the topic. We developed a wiki website that serves as a database of empirical studies, the availability […] The post Replication Wiki for economics appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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The field is a fractal

August 21, 2014
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In a blog comment, Winston Lin points to this quote from Bill Thurston: There is a real joy in doing mathematics, in learning ways of thinking that explain and organize and simplify. One can feel this joy discovering new mathematics, rediscovering old mathematics, learning a way of thinking from a person or text, or finding […] The post The field is a fractal appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Stroopy names

August 19, 2014
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Baby Name Wizard is all over this one. And this all makes me wonder: is there a psychology researcher somewhere with a dog named Stroopy? Probably so. P.S. I just made the mistake of googling “Stroopy.” Don’t do it. I was referri...

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“Psychohistory” and the hype paradox

August 15, 2014
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“Psychohistory” and the hype paradox

Lee Wilkinson writes: I thought you might be interested in this post. I was asked about this by someone at Skytree and replied with this link to Tyler Vigen’s Spurious Correlations. What’s most interesting about Vigen’s site is not his video (he doesn’t go into the dangers of correlating time series, for example), but his […] The post “Psychohistory” and the hype paradox appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Cool new position available: Director of the Pew Research Center Labs

August 10, 2014
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Peter Henne writes: I wanted to let you know about a new opportunity at Pew Research Center for a data scientist that might be relevant to some of your colleagues. I [Henne] am a researcher with the Pew Research Center, where I manage an international index on religious issues. I am also working with others […] The post Cool new position available: Director of the Pew Research Center Labs appeared…

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President of American Association of Buggy-Whip Manufacturers takes a strong stand against internal combustion engine, argues that the so-called “automobile” has “little grounding in theory” and that “results can vary widely based on the particular fuel that is used”

August 6, 2014
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President of American Association of Buggy-Whip Manufacturers takes a strong stand against internal combustion engine, argues that the so-called “automobile” has “little grounding in theory” and that “results can vary widely based on the particular fuel that is used”

Some people pointed me to this official statement signed by Michael Link, president of the American Association for Public Opinion Research (AAPOR). My colleague David Rothschild and I wrote a measured response to Link’s statement which I posted on the sister blog. But then I made the mistake of actually reading what Link wrote, and […] The post President of American Association of Buggy-Whip Manufacturers takes a strong stand against…

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Scientific communication by press release

August 6, 2014
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Hector Cordero-Guzman writes: I have a question for you about an ongoing congroversy\incident related to reporting of social science research. Please see article linked below if you have a chance. I think this incident exposes real problems in the way social science research is presented and how it reaches the public… http://www.latinorebels.com/2014/05/22/new-york-times-piece-on-hispanics-and-census-based-on-study-not-yet-finalized-or-public/ Essentially, we have […] The post Scientific communication by press release appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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