Posts Tagged ‘ Sociology ’

Blogs > Twitter

November 22, 2014
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Blogs > Twitter

Tweeting has its virtues, I’m sure. But over and over I’m seeing these blog vs. twitter battles where the blogger wins. It goes like this: blogger gives tons and tons of evidence, tweeter responds with a content-free dismissal. The most recent example (as of this posting; remember we’re on an approx 2-month delay here; yes, […] The post Blogs > Twitter appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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Replication controversies

November 19, 2014
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Replication controversies

I don’t know what ATR is but I’m glad somebody is on the job of prohibiting replication catastrophe: Seriously, though, I’m on a list regarding a reproducibility project, and someone forwarded along this blog by psychology researcher Simone Schnall, whose attitudes we discussed several months ago in the context of some controversies about attempted replications […] The post Replication controversies appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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4-year-old post on Arnold Zellner is oddly topical

November 19, 2014
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I’m re-running this Arnold Zellner obituary because it is relevant to two recent blog discussions: 1. Differences between econometrics and statistics 2. Old-fashioned sexism (of the quaint, not the horrible, variety) The post 4-year-old post on...

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Guys, we need to talk. (Houston, we have a problem).

November 17, 2014
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Guys, we need to talk. (Houston, we have a problem).

This post is by Phil Price. I’m posting it on Andrew’s blog without knowing exactly where he stands on this so it’s especially important for readers to note that this post is NOT BY ANDREW! Last week a prominent scientist, representing his entire team of researchers, appeared in widely distributed television interviews wearing a shirt […] The post Guys, we need to talk. (Houston, we have a problem). appeared first…

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“The Statistical Crisis in Science”: My talk in the psychology department Monday 17 Nov at noon

November 14, 2014
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Monday 17 Nov at 12:10pm in Schermerhorn room 200B, Columbia University: Top journals in psychology routinely publish ridiculous, scientifically implausible claims, justified based on “p < 0.05.” And this in turn calls into question all sorts of more plausible, but not necessarily true, claims, that are supported by this same sort of evidence. To put […] The post “The Statistical Crisis in Science”: My talk in the psychology department Monday…

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“Differences Between Econometrics and Statistics” (my talk this Monday at the University of Pennsylvania econ dept)

November 9, 2014
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“Differences Between Econometrics and Statistics” (my talk this Monday at the University of Pennsylvania econ dept)

Differences Between Econometrics and Statistics:  that’s the title of the talk I’ll be giving at the econometrics workshop at noon on Monday. At 4pm in the same place, I’ll be speaking on Stan. And here are some things for people to read: For “Differences between econometrics and statistics”: Everyone’s trading bias for variance at some […] The post “Differences Between Econometrics and Statistics” (my talk this Monday at the University…

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“Differences Between Econometrics and Statistics” (my talk this Monday at the University of Pennsylvania econ dept)

November 9, 2014
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“Differences Between Econometrics and Statistics” (my talk this Monday at the University of Pennsylvania econ dept)

Differences Between Econometrics and Statistics:  that’s the title of the talk I’ll be giving at the econometrics workshop at noon on Monday. At 4pm 4:30pm in the same place, I’ll be speaking on Stan. And here are some things for people to read: For “Differences between econometrics and statistics”: Everyone’s trading bias for variance at […] The post “Differences Between Econometrics and Statistics” (my talk this Monday at the University…

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Why I’m not posting on this topic

November 8, 2014
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A colleague writes: Following our recent ** article (on which you commented favourably . . .), are you maybe planning a blog post on this? Both ** and ** have extensively analysed the statistical methods used in the original article, and found them wanting. I would really like to see the ** article retracted, as […] The post Why I’m not posting on this topic appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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Scientists behaving badly

November 7, 2014
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By “badly,” I don’t just mean unethically or immorally; I’m also including those examples of individual scientists who are not clearly violating any ethical rules but are acting in a way as to degrade, rather than increase, our understanding of the world. In the latter case I include examples such as the senders of the […] The post Scientists behaving badly appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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Social research is not the same as health research: Macartan Humphreys gives new guidelines for ethics in social science research

November 4, 2014
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In reaction to the recent controversy about a research project that interfered with an election in Montana, political scientist Macartan Humphreys shares some excellent ideas on how to think about ethics in social science research: Social science researchers rely on principles developed by health researchers that do not always do the work asked of them […] The post Social research is not the same as health research: Macartan Humphreys gives…

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