Posts Tagged ‘ Miscellaneous Science ’

Is it possible to paint an overly bleak picture of university based clinical research?

December 13, 2017
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Recently I was reminiscing with an old colleague about  how our publications from almost 30 years ago that tried to encourage better conduct and reporting of clinical research seemed to have had so little impact. This one for instance. Recently, they suggested there is some reason to hope for better, pointing to a website reporting […] The post Is it possible to paint an overly bleak picture of university based…

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Wine + Stan + Climate change = ?

November 22, 2017
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Pablo Almaraz writes: Recently, I published a paper in the journal Climate Research in which I used RStan to conduct the statistical analyses: Almaraz P (2015) Bordeaux wine quality and climate fluctuations during the last century: changing temperatur...

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We start by talking reproducible research, then we drift to a discussion of voter turnout

November 21, 2017
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We start by talking reproducible research, then we drift to a discussion of voter turnout

Emil Kirkegaard writes: Regarding data sharing, you recently commented that “In future perhaps journals will require all data to be posted as a condition of publication and then this sort of thing won’t happen anymore.” We went a step further. We require public data sharing at submission. This means that from the moment one submits, […] The post We start by talking reproducible research, then we drift to a discussion…

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A pivotal episode in the unfolding of the replication crisis

November 20, 2017
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Axel Cleeremans writes: I appreciated your piece titled “What has happened down here is the winds have changed”. Your mini-history of what happened was truly enlightening — but you didn’t explicitly mention our failure to replicate Bargh’s slow walking effect. This was absolutely instrumental in triggering the replication crisis. As you know, the article was […] The post A pivotal episode in the unfolding of the replication crisis appeared first…

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No no no no no on “The oldest human lived to 122. Why no person will likely break her record.”

November 16, 2017
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I came across this news article by Brian Resnick entitled: The oldest human lived to 122. Why no person will likely break her record. Even with better medicine, living past 120 years will be extremely unlikely. I was skeptical, and I really didn’t buy it after reading the research article, “Evidence for a limit to […] The post No no no no no on “The oldest human lived to 122.…

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“What is a sandpit?”

November 15, 2017
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From Private Eye 1399, in Pseuds Corner: What is a sandpit? Sandpits are residential interactive workshops over five days involving 20-30 participants; the director, a team of expert mentors, and a number of independent stakeholders. Sandpits have a highly multidisciplinary mix of participants, some active researchers and others potential users of research outcomes, to drive […] The post “What is a sandpit?” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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What should this student do? His bosses want him to p-hack and they don’t even know it!

November 11, 2017
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Someone writes: I’m currently a PhD student in the social sciences department of a university. I recently got involved with a group of professors working on a project which involved some costly data-collection. None of them have any real statistical prowess, so they came to me to perform their analyses, which I was happy to […] The post What should this student do? His bosses want him to p-hack and…

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Noisy, heterogeneous data scoured from diverse sources make his metanalyses stronger.

November 10, 2017
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Kyle MacDonald writes: I wondered if you’d heard of Purvesh Khatri’s work in computational immunology, profiled in this Q&A with Esther Landhuis at Quanta yesterday. Elevator pitch is that he believes noisy, heterogeneous data scoured from diverse sources make his metanalyses stronger. The thing that gave me the woollies was this line: “We start with […] The post Noisy, heterogeneous data scoured from diverse sources make his metanalyses stronger. appeared…

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“A mixed economy is not an economic abomination or even a regrettably unavoidable political necessity but a natural absorbing state,” and other notes on “Whither Science?” by Danko Antolovic

November 9, 2017
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So. I got this email one day, promoting a book that came with the following blurb: Whither Science?, by Danko Antolovic, is a series of essays that explore some of the questions facing modern science. A short read at only 41 pages, Whither Science? looks into the fundamental questions about the purposes, practices and future […] The post “A mixed economy is not an economic abomination or even a regrettably…

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When people proudly take ridiculous positions

November 8, 2017
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Tom Wolfe on evolution: I think it’s misleading to say that human beings evolved from animals. I mean, actually, nobody knows whether they did or not. This is just sad. Does Wolfe really think this? My guess is he’s trying to do a solid for his political allies. Jerry Coyne writes: Somewhere on his mission […] The post When people proudly take ridiculous positions appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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