Posts Tagged ‘ Miscellaneous Science ’

“Lots of hype around pea milk, with little actual scrutiny”

May 23, 2016
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Paul Alper writes: Had no idea that “Pea Milk” existed, let alone controversial. Learn something new every day. Indeed, I’d never heard of it either. I guess “milk” is now a generic word for any white sugary drink? Sort of like “tea” is a generic word for any drink made from a powder steeped in […] The post “Lots of hype around pea milk, with little actual scrutiny” appeared first…

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What’s the motivation to do experiments on motivation?

May 10, 2016
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What’s the motivation to do experiments on motivation?

Bill Harris writes: Do you or your readers have any insights into the research that underlays Dan Pink’s work on motivation and Tom Wujec’s (or Peter Skillman’s) work on iterative development?  They make intuitive sense to me (but may be counterintuitive to others), but I don’t know much more about them. Pink’s work is summarized […] The post What’s the motivation to do experiments on motivation? appeared first on Statistical…

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Doing data science

May 7, 2016
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Someone sent me this question: As a social and political science expert, you analyze data related to everything from public health and clinical research to college football. Considering how adaptable analytics expertise is, what kinds of careers available to one with this skillset? In which industries are data scientists and analysts in particularly demand? What […] The post Doing data science appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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The Puzzle of Paul Meehl: An intellectual history of research criticism in psychology

May 6, 2016
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The Puzzle of Paul Meehl:  An intellectual history of research criticism in psychology

There’s nothing wrong with Meehl. He’s great. The puzzle of Paul Meehl is that everything we’re saying now, all this stuff about the problems with Psychological Science and PPNAS and Ted talks and all that, Paul Meehl was saying 50 years ago. And it was no secret. So how is it that all this was […] The post The Puzzle of Paul Meehl: An intellectual history of research criticism in…

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No Retractions, Only Corrections: A manifesto.

May 1, 2016
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Under the heading, “Why that Evolution paper should never have been retracted: A reviewer speaks out,” biologist Ben Ashby writes: The problems of post-publication peer review have already been highlighted elsewhere, and it certainly isn’t rare for a paper to be retracted due to an honest mistake (although most retractions are due to misconduct). Moreover, […] The post No Retractions, Only Corrections: A manifesto. appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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I owe it all to my Neanderthal genes

April 25, 2016
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I owe it all to my Neanderthal genes

Yesterday I posted a methods-focused item at the Monkey Cage, a follow-up of a post from a couple years ago arguing against some dramatic claims by economists Ashraf and Galor regarding the wealth of nations. No big deal, just some standard-issue skepticism. But for some reason this one caught fire—maybe somebody important linked to it, […] The post I owe it all to my Neanderthal genes appeared first on Statistical…

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A new idea for a science core course based entirely on computer simulation

April 21, 2016
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I happen to come across this post from 2011 that I like so much, I thought I’d say it again: Columbia College has for many years had a Core Curriculum, in which students read classics such as Plato (in translation) etc. A few years ago they created a Science core course. There was always some […] The post A new idea for a science core course based entirely on computer…

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“Cancer Research Is Broken”

April 20, 2016
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Michael Oakes pointed me to this excellent news article by Daniel Engber, subtitled, “There’s a replication crisis in biomedicine—and no one even knows how deep it runs.” Engber suggests that the replication problem in biomedical research is worse than the much-publicized replication problem in psychology. One reason, which I didn’t see Engber discussing, is financial […] The post “Cancer Research Is Broken” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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Avoiding model selection in Bayesian social research

April 16, 2016
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The other day I happened to come across this paper that I wrote with Don Rubin in 1995. I really like it—it’s so judicious and mature, I can’t believe I wrote it over 20 years ago! Let this be a lesson to all of you that it’s possible to get somewhere by reasoning from first […] The post Avoiding model selection in Bayesian social research appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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Why I don’t believe Fergus Simpson’s Big Alien Theory

April 12, 2016
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Why I don’t believe Fergus Simpson’s Big Alien Theory

It all began with this message from Christopher Bonnett: I’m a observational cosmologist and I am writing you as I think the following paper + article might be of interest for your blog. A fellow cosmologist, Fergus Simpson, has done a Bayesian analysis on the size of aliens, it has passed peer-review and has been […] The post Why I don’t believe Fergus Simpson’s Big Alien Theory appeared first on…

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