Posts Tagged ‘ Miscellaneous Science ’

“Children seek historical traces of owned objects”

July 24, 2016
By

Recently in the sister blog: An object’s mental representation includes not just visible attributes but also its nonvisible history. The present studies tested whether preschoolers seek subtle indicators of an object’s history, such as a mark acquired during its handling. Five studies with 169 children 3–5 years of age and 97 college students found that […] The post “Children seek historical traces of owned objects” appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

Read more »

You can post social science papers on the new SocArxiv

July 17, 2016
By

I learned about it from this post by Elizabeth Popp Berman. The temporary SocArxiv site is here. It is connected to the Open Science Framework, which we’ve heard a lot about in discussions of preregistration. You can post your papers at SocArxiv right away following these easy steps: Send an email to the following address(es) […] The post You can post social science papers on the new SocArxiv appeared first…

Read more »

“Most notably, the vast majority of Americans support criminalizing data fraud, and many also believe the offense deserves a sentence of incarceration.”

July 11, 2016
By
“Most notably, the vast majority of Americans support criminalizing data fraud, and many also believe the offense deserves a sentence of incarceration.”

Justin Pickett sends along this paper he wrote with Sean Roche: Data fraud and selective reporting both present serious threats to the credibility of science. However, there remains considerable disagreement among scientists about how best to sanction data fraud, and about the ethicality of selective reporting. OK, let’s move away from asking scientists. Let’s ask […] The post “Most notably, the vast majority of Americans support criminalizing data fraud, and…

Read more »

Why experimental economics might well be doing better than social psychology when it comes to replication

June 30, 2016
By

There’s a new paper, “Evaluating replicability of laboratory experiments in economics,” by Colin Camerer, Anna Dreber, Eskil Forsell, Teck-Hua Ho, Jürgen Huber, Magnus Johannesson, Michael Kirchler, Johan Almenberg, Adam Altmejd, Taizan Chan, Emma Heikensten, Felix Holzmeister, Taisuke Imai, Siri Isaksson, Gideon Nave, Thomas Pfeiffer, Michael Razen, Hang Wu, which three different people sent to me, […] The post Why experimental economics might well be doing better than social psychology when…

Read more »

Time-reversal heuristic as randomization, and p < .05 as conflict of interest declaration

June 22, 2016
By

Alex Gamma writes: Reading your blog recently has inspired two ideas which have in common that they analogize statistical concepts with non-statistical ones related to science: The time-reversal heuristic as randomization: Pushing your idea further leads to the notion of randomization of the sequence of study “reporting”. Studies are produced sequentially, but consumers of science […] The post Time-reversal heuristic as randomization, and p < .05 as conflict of interest…

Read more »

How an academic urban legend can spread because of the difficulty of clear citation

June 19, 2016
By
How an academic urban legend can spread because of the difficulty of clear citation

Allan Dafoe writes: I just came across this article about academic urban legends spreading because of sloppy citation practices. I found it fascinating and relevant to the conversations on your blog. The article is by Ole Bjørn Rekdal and it is indeed fascinating. It begins as follows: Many of the messages presented in respectable scientific […] The post How an academic urban legend can spread because of the difficulty of…

Read more »

“Replication initiatives will not salvage the trustworthiness of psychology”

May 31, 2016
By
“Replication initiatives will not salvage the trustworthiness of psychology”

So says James Coyne, going full Meehl. I agree. Replication is great, but if you replicate noise studies, you’ll just get noise, hence the beneficial effects on science are (a) to reduce confidence in silly studies that we mostly shouldn’t have taken seriously in the first place, and (b) to provide an disincentive for future […] The post “Replication initiatives will not salvage the trustworthiness of psychology” appeared first on…

Read more »

“Lots of hype around pea milk, with little actual scrutiny”

May 23, 2016
By

Paul Alper writes: Had no idea that “Pea Milk” existed, let alone controversial. Learn something new every day. Indeed, I’d never heard of it either. I guess “milk” is now a generic word for any white sugary drink? Sort of like “tea” is a generic word for any drink made from a powder steeped in […] The post “Lots of hype around pea milk, with little actual scrutiny” appeared first…

Read more »

What’s the motivation to do experiments on motivation?

May 10, 2016
By
What’s the motivation to do experiments on motivation?

Bill Harris writes: Do you or your readers have any insights into the research that underlays Dan Pink’s work on motivation and Tom Wujec’s (or Peter Skillman’s) work on iterative development?  They make intuitive sense to me (but may be counterintuitive to others), but I don’t know much more about them. Pink’s work is summarized […] The post What’s the motivation to do experiments on motivation? appeared first on Statistical…

Read more »

Doing data science

May 7, 2016
By

Someone sent me this question: As a social and political science expert, you analyze data related to everything from public health and clinical research to college football. Considering how adaptable analytics expertise is, what kinds of careers available to one with this skillset? In which industries are data scientists and analysts in particularly demand? What […] The post Doing data science appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

Read more »


Subscribe

Email:

  Subscribe