Posts Tagged ‘ Miscellaneous Science ’

Is the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex “selective for pain”?

January 21, 2017
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Is the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex “selective for pain”?

Peter Clayson writes: I have spent much of the last 6 months or so of my life trying to learn Bayesian statistics on my own. It’s been a difficult, yet rewarding experience. I have a question about a research debate that is going on my field. Briefly, the debate between some very prominent scholars in […] The post Is the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex “selective for pain”? appeared first on…

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Alternatives to jail for scientific fraud

January 20, 2017
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Alternatives to jail for scientific fraud

Mark Tuttle pointed me to this article by Amy Ellis Nutt, who writes: Since 2000, the number of U.S. academic fraud cases in science has risen dramatically. Five years ago, the journal Nature tallied the number of retractions in the previous decade and revealed they had shot up 10-fold. About half of the retractions were […] The post Alternatives to jail for scientific fraud appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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A small, underpowered treasure trove?

January 12, 2017
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A small, underpowered treasure trove?

Benjamin Kirkup writes: As you sometimes comment on such things; I’m forwarding you a journal editorial (in a society journal) that presents “lessons learned” from an associated research study. What caught my attention was the comment on the “notorious” design, the lack of “significant” results, and the “interesting data on nonsignificant associations.” Apparently, the work […] The post A small, underpowered treasure trove? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Two unrelated topics in one post: (1) Teaching useful algebra classes, and (2) doing more careful psychological measurements

December 30, 2016
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Kevin Lewis and Paul Alper send me so much material, I think they need their own blogs. In the meantime, I keep posting the stuff they send me, as part of my desperate effort to empty my inbox. 1. From Lewis: “Should Students Assessed as Needing Remedial Mathematics Take College-Level Quantitative Courses Instead? A Randomized […] The post Two unrelated topics in one post: (1) Teaching useful algebra classes, and…

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“The Pitfall of Experimenting on the Web: How Unattended Selective Attrition Leads to Surprising (Yet False) Research Conclusions”

December 29, 2016
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“The Pitfall of Experimenting on the Web: How Unattended Selective Attrition Leads to Surprising (Yet False) Research Conclusions”

Kevin Lewis points us to this paper by Haotian Zhou and Ayelet Fishbach, which begins: The authors find that experimental studies using online samples (e.g., MTurk) often violate the assumption of random assignment, because participant attrition—quitting a study before completing it and getting paid—is not only prevalent, but also varies systemically across experimental conditions. Using […] The post “The Pitfall of Experimenting on the Web: How Unattended Selective Attrition Leads…

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“I thought it would be most unfortunate if a lab . . . wasted time and effort trying to replicate our results.”

December 29, 2016
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“I thought it would be most unfortunate if a lab . . . wasted time and effort trying to replicate our results.”

Mark Palko points us to this news article by George Dvorsky: A Harvard research team led by biologist Douglas Melton has retracted a promising research paper following multiple failed attempts to reproduce the original findings. . . . In June 2016, the authors published an article in the open access journal PLOS One stating that […] The post “I thought it would be most unfortunate if a lab . .…

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Applying statistical thinking to the search for extraterrestrial intelligence

December 15, 2016
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Applying statistical thinking to the search for extraterrestrial intelligence

Thomas Basbøll writes: A statistical question has been bugging me lately. I recently heard that Yuti Milner has donated 100 millions dollars to 10-year search for extraterrestrial intelligence. I’m not very practiced in working out probability functions but I thought maybe you or your readers would find it easy and fun to do this. Here’s […] The post Applying statistical thinking to the search for extraterrestrial intelligence appeared first on…

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Designing an animal-like brain: black-box “deep learning algorithms” to solve problems, with an (approximately) Bayesian “consciousness” or “executive functioning organ” that attempts to make sense of all these inferences

December 15, 2016
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Designing an animal-like brain:  black-box “deep learning algorithms” to solve problems, with an (approximately) Bayesian “consciousness” or “executive functioning organ” that attempts to make sense of all these inferences

The journal Behavioral and Brain Sciences will be publishing this paper, “Building Machines That Learn and Think Like People,” by Brenden Lake, Tomer Ullman, Joshua Tenenbaum, and Samuel Gershman. Here’s the abstract: Recent progress in artificial intelligence (AI) has renewed interest in building systems that learn and think like people. Many advances have come from […] The post Designing an animal-like brain: black-box “deep learning algorithms” to solve problems, with…

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Science journalist recommends going easy on Bigfoot, says you should bash of mammograms instead

December 14, 2016
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Paul Alper points us to this transcribed lecture by John Horgan. It’s a talk Horgan gave to a conference on Science and Skepticism, which began: I [Horgan] am a science journalist. I don’t celebrate science, I criticize it, because science needs critics more than cheerleaders. I point out gaps between scientific hype and reality. That […] The post Science journalist recommends going easy on Bigfoot, says you should bash of…

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The social world is (in many ways) continuous but people’s mental models of the world are Boolean

December 13, 2016
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The social world is (in many ways) continuous but people’s mental models of the world are Boolean

Raghu Parthasarathy points me to this post and writes: I wrote after seeing one too many talks in which someone bases boolean statements about effects “existing” or “not existing” (infuriating in itself) based on “p < 0.05” or “p > 0.5”. Of course, you’ve written tons of great things on the pitfalls, errors, and general […] The post The social world is (in many ways) continuous but people’s mental models…

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