Posts Tagged ‘ Miscellaneous Science ’

Soil Scientists Seeking Super Model

November 20, 2014
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Soil Scientists Seeking Super Model

I (Bob) spent last weekend at Biosphere 2, collaborating with soil carbon biogeochemists on a “super model.” Model combination and expansion The biogeochemists (three sciences in one!) have developed hundreds of competing models and the goal of the workshop was to kick off some projects on putting some of them together intos wholes that are […] The post Soil Scientists Seeking Super Model appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Replication controversies

November 19, 2014
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Replication controversies

I don’t know what ATR is but I’m glad somebody is on the job of prohibiting replication catastrophe: Seriously, though, I’m on a list regarding a reproducibility project, and someone forwarded along this blog by psychology researcher Simone Schnall, whose attitudes we discussed several months ago in the context of some controversies about attempted replications […] The post Replication controversies appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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Guys, we need to talk. (Houston, we have a problem).

November 17, 2014
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Guys, we need to talk. (Houston, we have a problem).

This post is by Phil Price. I’m posting it on Andrew’s blog without knowing exactly where he stands on this so it’s especially important for readers to note that this post is NOT BY ANDREW! Last week a prominent scientist, representing his entire team of researchers, appeared in widely distributed television interviews wearing a shirt […] The post Guys, we need to talk. (Houston, we have a problem). appeared first…

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When am I a conservative and when am I a liberal (when it comes to statistics, that is)?

October 10, 2014
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When am I a conservative and when am I a liberal (when it comes to statistics, that is)?

Here I am one day: Let me conclude with a statistical point. Sometimes researchers want to play it safe by using traditional methods — most notoriously, in that recent note by Michael Link, president of the American Association of Public Opinion Research, arguing against non-probability sampling on the (unsupported) grounds that such methods have “little […]

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“Science does not advance by guessing”

October 9, 2014
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I agree with Deborah Mayo who agrees with Carlo Rovelli that “Science does not advance by guessing. It advances by new data or by a deep investigation of the content and the apparent contradictions of previous empirically successful theories.” And, speaking as a statistician and statistical educator, I think there’s a big problem with the […]

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Confirmationist and falsificationist paradigms of science

September 5, 2014
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Deborah Mayo and I had a recent blog discussion that I think might be of general interest so I’m reproducing some of it here. The general issue is how we think about research hypotheses and statistical evidence. Following Popper etc., I see two basic paradigms: Confirmationist: You gather data and look for evidence in support […] The post Confirmationist and falsificationist paradigms of science appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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Recently in the sister blog

August 22, 2014
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Recently in the sister blog

Meritocracy won’t happen: the problem’s with the ‘ocracy’ Does the sex of your child affect your political attitudes? More hype about political attitudes and neuroscience Modern polling needs innovation, not traditionalism Who cares about copycat pollsters? The mythical swing voter Mythical swing voter update No, all Americans are not created equal when it comes to […] The post Recently in the sister blog appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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“An Experience with a Registered Replication Project”

July 25, 2014
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Anne Pier Salverda writes: I came across this blog entry, “An Experience with a Registered Replication Project,” and thought that you would find this interesting. It’s written by Simone Schnall, a social psychologist who is the first author of an oft-cited Psych Science(!) paper (“Cleanliness reduces the severity of moral judgments”) that a group of […] The post “An Experience with a Registered Replication Project” appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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“Building on theories used to describe magnets, scientists have put together a model that captures something very different . . .”

July 14, 2014
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There’s a story that (some) physicists and science reporters seem to like, which is the idea that some clever mathematician or physicist can derive universal laws of social behavior. It’s time to tell you all: Hari Seldon never existed. Here’s what I think of these stories of physicists who discover the laws of society. I […] The post “Building on theories used to describe magnets, scientists have put together a…

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Estimating a customer satisfaction regression, asking only a subset of predictors for each person

June 26, 2014
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Someone writes in with an interesting question: I’d like to speak with you briefly to get your thoughts on the imputation of missing data in a new online web-survey technique I’m developing. Our survey uses Split Questionnaire Design. The total number of surveys will vary in length with different customers, but will generally be between […] The post Estimating a customer satisfaction regression, asking only a subset of predictors for…

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