Posts Tagged ‘ Miscellaneous Science ’

Humility needed in decision-making

July 2, 2015
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Brian MacGillivray and Nick Pidgeon write: Daniel Gilbert maintains that people generally make bad decisions on risk issues, and suggests that communication strategies and education programmes would help (Nature 474, 275–277; 2011). This version of the deficit model pervades policy-making and branches of the social sciences. In this model, conflicts between expert and public perceptions […] The post Humility needed in decision-making appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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Sam Smith sings like a dream but he’s as clueless as Nicholas Wade when it comes to genetics

June 26, 2015
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Psychologists speak of “folk psychology” or “folk physics” as the intuitive notions we have about the world, which typically describe some aspects of reality but ultimately are gross oversimplifications. I encountered a good example of “folk genetics” the other day after following the clickbait link to “22 Things We Learned Hanging Out With Sam Smith”: […] The post Sam Smith sings like a dream but he’s as clueless as Nicholas…

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Born-open data

June 17, 2015
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Born-open data

Jeff Rouder writes: Although many researchers agree that scientific data should be open to scrutiny to ferret out poor analyses and outright fraud, most raw data sets are not available on demand. There are many reasons researchers do not open their data, and one is technical. It is often time consuming to prepare and archive […] The post Born-open data appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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Cross-validation != magic

June 2, 2015
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In a post entitled “A subtle way to over-fit,” John Cook writes: If you train a model on a set of data, it should fit that data well. The hope, however, is that it will fit a new set of data well. So in machine learning and statistics, people split their data into two parts. […] The post Cross-validation != magic appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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My final post on this Tony Blair thing

June 1, 2015
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My final post on this Tony Blair thing

Gur Huberman writes on the recent fraud in experiments in polisci: This comment is a reaction to the little of the discussion which I [Gur] followed, mostly in the NYTimes. What I didn’t see anybody say is that the system actually worked. First, there’s a peer-reviewed report in Science. Then other people deem the results […] The post My final post on this Tony Blair thing appeared first on Statistical…

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The greatest impediment to research progress is not impediments to research progress, it is scientists reading about impediments to research progress

May 31, 2015
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My short answer is that I think twitter is destructive of clear communication. Now I’ll give the question, and I’ll give my long answer. Here’s the question provided by a reader: Just wondering what you thought of Brian Nosek’s recent comment on twitter, “The biggest impediment to research progress is not fraud, it is all […] The post The greatest impediment to research progress is not impediments to research progress,…

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John Bohannon’s chocolate-and-weight-loss hoax study actually understates the problems with standard p-value scientific practice

May 29, 2015
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John Bohannon’s chocolate-and-weight-loss hoax study actually understates the problems with standard p-value scientific practice

Several people pointed me to this awesome story by John Bohannon: “Slim by Chocolate!” the headlines blared. A team of German researchers had found that people on a low-carb diet lost weight 10 percent faster if they ate a chocolate bar every day. It made the front page of Bild, Europe’s largest daily newspaper, just […] The post John Bohannon’s chocolate-and-weight-loss hoax study actually understates the problems with standard p-value…

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Creativity is the ability to see relationships where none exist

May 22, 2015
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Creativity is the ability to see relationships where none exist

Brent Goldfarb and Andrew King, in a paper to appear in the journal Strategic Management, write: In a recent issue of this journal, Bettis (2012) reports a conversation with a graduate student who forthrightly announced that he had been trained by faculty to “search for asterisks”. The student explained that he sifted through large databases […] The post Creativity is the ability to see relationships where none exist appeared first…

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Can talk therapy halve the rate of cancer recurrence? How to think about the statistical significance of this finding? Is it just another example of the garden of forking paths?

May 21, 2015
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James Coyne (who we last encountered in the sad story of Ellen Langer) writes: I’m writing to you now about another matter about which I hope you will offer an opinion. Here is a critique of a study, as well as the original study that claimed to find an effect of group psychotherapy on time […] The post Can talk therapy halve the rate of cancer recurrence? How to think…

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The connection between varying treatment effects and the well-known optimism of published research findings

May 14, 2015
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Jacob Hartog writes: I thought this article [by Hunt Allcott and Sendhil Mullainathan], although already a couple of years old, fits very well into the themes of your blog—in particular the idea that the “true” treatment effect is likely to vary a lot depending on all kinds of factors that we can and cannot observe, […] The post The connection between varying treatment effects and the well-known optimism of published…

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