Posts Tagged ‘ Miscellaneous Science ’

Bird fight! (Kroodsma vs. Podos)

August 13, 2017
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Bird fight!  (Kroodsma vs. Podos)

Donald Kroodsma writes: Birdsong biologists interested in sexual selection and honest signalling have repeatedly reported confirmation, over more than a decade, of the biological significance of a scatterplot between trill rate and frequency bandwidth. This ‘performance hypothesis’ proposes that the closer a song plots to an upper bound on the graph, the more difficult the […] The post Bird fight! (Kroodsma vs. Podos) appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Wolfram on Golomb

August 7, 2017
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Wolfram on Golomb

I was checking out Stephen Wolfram’s blog and found this excellent obituary of Solomon Golomb, the mathematician who invented the maximum-length linear-feedback shift register sequence, characterized by Wolfram as “probably the single most-used mathematical algorithm idea in history.” But Golomb is probably more famous for inventing polyominoes. The whole thing’s a good read, and it […] The post Wolfram on Golomb appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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Reproducing biological research is harder than you’d think

July 31, 2017
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Mark Tuttle points us to this news article by Monya Baker and Elie Dolgin, which goes as follows: Cancer reproducibility project releases first results An open-science effort to replicate dozens of cancer-biology studies is off to a confusing start. Purists will tell you that science is about what scientists don’t know, which is true but […] The post Reproducing biological research is harder than you’d think appeared first on Statistical…

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Iceland education gene trend kangaroo

July 30, 2017
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Someone who works in genetics writes: You may have seen the recent study in PNAS about genetic prediction of educational attainment in Iceland. the authors report in a very concerned fashion that every generation the attainment of education as predicted from genetics decreases by 0.1 standard deviations. This sounds bad. But consider that the University […] The post Iceland education gene trend kangaroo appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Recently in the sister blog

July 24, 2017
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This research is 60 years in the making: How “you” makes meaning “You” is one of the most common words in the English language. Although it typically refers to the person addressed (“How are you?”), “you” is also used to make timeless statements about people in general (“You win some, you lose some.”). Here, we […] The post Recently in the sister blog appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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How to design future studies of systemic exercise intolerance disease (chronic fatigue syndrome)?

July 17, 2017
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Someone named Ramsey writes on behalf of a self-managed support community of 100+ systemic exercise intolerance disease (SEID) patients. He read my recent article on the topic and had a question regarding the following excerpt: For conditions like S.E.I.D., then, the better approach may be to gather data from people suffering “in the wild,” combining […] The post How to design future studies of systemic exercise intolerance disease (chronic fatigue…

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They want help designing a crowdsourcing data analysis project

July 16, 2017
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Michael Feldman writes: My collaborators and myself are doing research where we try to understand the reasons for the variability in data analysis (“the garden of forking paths”). Our goal is to understand the reasons why scientists make different decisions regarding their analyses and in doing so reach different results. In a project called “Crowdsourcing […] The post They want help designing a crowdsourcing data analysis project appeared first on…

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“The Null Hypothesis Screening Fallacy”?

July 3, 2017
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[non-cat picture] Rick Gerkin writes: A few months ago you posted your list of blog posts in draft stage and I noticed that “Humans Can Discriminate More than 1 Trillion Olfactory Stimuli. Not.” was still on that list. It was about some concerns I had about a paper in Science (http://science.sciencemag.org/content/343/6177/1370). After talking it through […] The post “The Null Hypothesis Screening Fallacy”? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Capitalist science: The solution to the replication crisis?

June 27, 2017
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Bruce Knuteson pointed me to this article, which begins: The solution to science’s replication crisis is a new ecosystem in which scientists sell what they learn from their research. In each pairwise transaction, the information seller makes (loses) money if he turns out to be correct (incorrect). Responsibility for the determination of correctness is delegated, […] The post Capitalist science: The solution to the replication crisis? appeared first on Statistical…

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PhD student fellowship opportunity! in Belgium! to work with us! on the multiverse and other projects on improving the reproducibility of psychological research!!!

June 12, 2017
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[image of Jip and Janneke dancing with a cat] Wolf Vanpaemel and Francis Tuerlinckx write: We at the Quantitative Psychology and Individual Differences, KU Leuven, Belgium are looking for a PhD candidate. The goal of the PhD research is to develop and apply novel methodologies to increase the reproducibility of psychological science. More information can […] The post PhD student fellowship opportunity! in Belgium! to work with us! on the…

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