Posts Tagged ‘ Miscellaneous Science ’

Time-reversal heuristic as randomization, and p < .05 as conflict of interest declaration

June 22, 2016
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Alex Gamma writes: Reading your blog recently has inspired two ideas which have in common that they analogize statistical concepts with non-statistical ones related to science: The time-reversal heuristic as randomization: Pushing your idea further leads to the notion of randomization of the sequence of study “reporting”. Studies are produced sequentially, but consumers of science […] The post Time-reversal heuristic as randomization, and p < .05 as conflict of interest…

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How an academic urban legend can spread because of the difficulty of clear citation

June 19, 2016
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How an academic urban legend can spread because of the difficulty of clear citation

Allan Dafoe writes: I just came across this article about academic urban legends spreading because of sloppy citation practices. I found it fascinating and relevant to the conversations on your blog. The article is by Ole Bjørn Rekdal and it is indeed fascinating. It begins as follows: Many of the messages presented in respectable scientific […] The post How an academic urban legend can spread because of the difficulty of…

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“Replication initiatives will not salvage the trustworthiness of psychology”

May 31, 2016
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“Replication initiatives will not salvage the trustworthiness of psychology”

So says James Coyne, going full Meehl. I agree. Replication is great, but if you replicate noise studies, you’ll just get noise, hence the beneficial effects on science are (a) to reduce confidence in silly studies that we mostly shouldn’t have taken seriously in the first place, and (b) to provide an disincentive for future […] The post “Replication initiatives will not salvage the trustworthiness of psychology” appeared first on…

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“Lots of hype around pea milk, with little actual scrutiny”

May 23, 2016
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Paul Alper writes: Had no idea that “Pea Milk” existed, let alone controversial. Learn something new every day. Indeed, I’d never heard of it either. I guess “milk” is now a generic word for any white sugary drink? Sort of like “tea” is a generic word for any drink made from a powder steeped in […] The post “Lots of hype around pea milk, with little actual scrutiny” appeared first…

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What’s the motivation to do experiments on motivation?

May 10, 2016
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What’s the motivation to do experiments on motivation?

Bill Harris writes: Do you or your readers have any insights into the research that underlays Dan Pink’s work on motivation and Tom Wujec’s (or Peter Skillman’s) work on iterative development?  They make intuitive sense to me (but may be counterintuitive to others), but I don’t know much more about them. Pink’s work is summarized […] The post What’s the motivation to do experiments on motivation? appeared first on Statistical…

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Doing data science

May 7, 2016
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Someone sent me this question: As a social and political science expert, you analyze data related to everything from public health and clinical research to college football. Considering how adaptable analytics expertise is, what kinds of careers available to one with this skillset? In which industries are data scientists and analysts in particularly demand? What […] The post Doing data science appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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The Puzzle of Paul Meehl: An intellectual history of research criticism in psychology

May 6, 2016
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The Puzzle of Paul Meehl:  An intellectual history of research criticism in psychology

There’s nothing wrong with Meehl. He’s great. The puzzle of Paul Meehl is that everything we’re saying now, all this stuff about the problems with Psychological Science and PPNAS and Ted talks and all that, Paul Meehl was saying 50 years ago. And it was no secret. So how is it that all this was […] The post The Puzzle of Paul Meehl: An intellectual history of research criticism in…

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No Retractions, Only Corrections: A manifesto.

May 1, 2016
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Under the heading, “Why that Evolution paper should never have been retracted: A reviewer speaks out,” biologist Ben Ashby writes: The problems of post-publication peer review have already been highlighted elsewhere, and it certainly isn’t rare for a paper to be retracted due to an honest mistake (although most retractions are due to misconduct). Moreover, […] The post No Retractions, Only Corrections: A manifesto. appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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I owe it all to my Neanderthal genes

April 25, 2016
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I owe it all to my Neanderthal genes

Yesterday I posted a methods-focused item at the Monkey Cage, a follow-up of a post from a couple years ago arguing against some dramatic claims by economists Ashraf and Galor regarding the wealth of nations. No big deal, just some standard-issue skepticism. But for some reason this one caught fire—maybe somebody important linked to it, […] The post I owe it all to my Neanderthal genes appeared first on Statistical…

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A new idea for a science core course based entirely on computer simulation

April 21, 2016
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I happen to come across this post from 2011 that I like so much, I thought I’d say it again: Columbia College has for many years had a Core Curriculum, in which students read classics such as Plato (in translation) etc. A few years ago they created a Science core course. There was always some […] The post A new idea for a science core course based entirely on computer…

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