Posts Tagged ‘ Miscellaneous Science ’

Uri Simonsohn warns us not to be falsely reassured

August 31, 2015
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Uri Simonsohn warns us not to be falsely reassured

I agree with Uri Simonsohn that you don’t learn much by looking at the distribution of all the p-values that have appeared in some literature. Uri explains: Most p-values reported in most papers are irrelevant for the strategic behavior of interest. Covariates, manipulation checks, main effects in studies testing interactions, etc. Including them we underestimate […] The post Uri Simonsohn warns us not to be falsely reassured appeared first on…

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New paper on psychology replication

August 28, 2015
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New paper on psychology replication

The Open Science Collaboration, a team led by psychology researcher Brian Nosek, organized the replication of 100 published psychology experiments. They report: A large portion of replications produced weaker evidence for the original findings despite using materials provided by the original authors, review in advance for methodological fidelity, and high statistical power to detect the […] The post New paper on psychology replication appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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“Women Respond to Nobel Laureate’s ‘Trouble With Girls’”

July 30, 2015
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Someone pointed me to this amusing/horrifying story of a clueless oldster. Some people are horrified by what the old guy said, other people are horrified by how he was treated. He was clueless in his views about women in science, or he was cluelessly naive about gotcha journalism. I haven’t been following the details and […] The post “Women Respond to Nobel Laureate’s ‘Trouble With Girls'” appeared first on Statistical…

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“We can keep debating this after 11 years, but I’m sure we all have much more pressing things to do (grants? papers? family time? attacking 11-year-old papers by former classmates? guitar practice?)”

July 28, 2015
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Someone pointed me to this discussion by Lior Pachter of a controversial claim in biology. The statistics The statistical content has to do with a biology paper by M. Kellis, B. W. Birren, and E.S. Lander from 2004 that contains the following passage: Strikingly, 95% of cases of accelerated evolution involve only one member of […] The post “We can keep debating this after 11 years, but I’m sure we…

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Richard Feynman and the tyranny of measurement

July 20, 2015
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I followed a link at Steve Hsu’s blog and came to this discussion of Feyman’s cognitive style. Hsu writes that “it was often easier for [Feynman] to invent his own solution than to read through someone else’s lengthy paper” and he follows up with a story in which “Feynman did not understand the conventional formulation […] The post Richard Feynman and the tyranny of measurement appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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Psych dept: “We are especially interested in candidates whose research program contributes to the development of new quantitative methods”

July 16, 2015
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This is cool. The #1 psychology department in the world is looking for a quantitative researcher: The Department of Psychology at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, invites applications for a tenure-track faculty position. The expected start date is September 1, 2016. The primary criterion for appointment is excellence in research and teaching. We are […] The post Psych dept: “We are especially interested in candidates whose research program contributes…

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“Physical Models of Living Systems”

July 12, 2015
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Phil Nelson writes: I’d like to alert you that my new textbook, “Physical Models of Living Systems,” has just been published. Among other things, this book is my attempt to bring Bayesian inference to undergraduates in any science or engineering major, and the course I teach from it has been enthusiastically received. The book is […] The post “Physical Models of Living Systems” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Economists betting on replication

July 10, 2015
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Mark Patterson writes: A bunch of folks are collaborating on a project to replicate 18 experimental studies published in prominent Econ journals (mostly American Economic Review, a few Quarterly Journal of Economics). This is already pretty exciting, but the really cool bit is they’re opening a market (with real money) to predict which studies will […] The post Economists betting on replication appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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Humility needed in decision-making

July 2, 2015
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Brian MacGillivray and Nick Pidgeon write: Daniel Gilbert maintains that people generally make bad decisions on risk issues, and suggests that communication strategies and education programmes would help (Nature 474, 275–277; 2011). This version of the deficit model pervades policy-making and branches of the social sciences. In this model, conflicts between expert and public perceptions […] The post Humility needed in decision-making appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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Sam Smith sings like a dream but he’s as clueless as Nicholas Wade when it comes to genetics

June 26, 2015
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Psychologists speak of “folk psychology” or “folk physics” as the intuitive notions we have about the world, which typically describe some aspects of reality but ultimately are gross oversimplifications. I encountered a good example of “folk genetics” the other day after following the clickbait link to “22 Things We Learned Hanging Out With Sam Smith”: […] The post Sam Smith sings like a dream but he’s as clueless as Nicholas…

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