Posts Tagged ‘ Miscellaneous Science ’

One thing I like about hierarchical modeling is that is not just about criticism. It’s a way to improve inferences, not just a way to adjust p-values.

January 29, 2016
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In an email exchange regarding the difficulty many researchers have in engaging with statistical criticism (see here for a recent example), a colleague of mine opined: Nowadays, promotion requires more publications, and in an academic environment, researchers are asked to do more than they can. So many researchers just work like workers in a product […] The post One thing I like about hierarchical modeling is that is not just…

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Kéry and Schaub’s Bayesian Population Analysis Translated to Stan

January 21, 2016
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Kéry and Schaub’s Bayesian Population Analysis Translated to Stan

Hiroki ITÔ (pictured) has done everyone a service in translating to Stan the example models [update: only chapters 3–8, not the whole book; the rest are in the works] from Marc Kéry and Michael Schaub (2012) Bayesian Population Analysis using WinBUGS: A Hierarchical Perspective. Academic Press. You can find the code in our example-models repository […] The post Kéry and Schaub’s Bayesian Population Analysis Translated to Stan appeared first on…

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Scientists Not Behaving Badly

January 16, 2016
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Scientists Not Behaving Badly

Andrea Panizza writes: I just read about psychologist Uri Simonson debunking a research by colleagues Raphael Silberzahn & Eric Uhlmann on the positive effects of noble-sounding German surnames on people’s careers (!!!). Here the fact is mentioned. I think that the interesting part (apart, of course, from the general weirdness of Silberzahn & Uhlmann’s research […] The post Scientists Not Behaving Badly appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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Rapid post-publication review

December 21, 2015
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A colleague points me to a published paper and writes: Do you believe this finding? If your biology isn’t strong enough to pass judgement — mine certainly isn’t — can you ask somebody who knows? My reply: 4 groups with a total n=71? No way. The topic is too sad for me to mock on […] The post Rapid post-publication review appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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Gathering of philosophers and physicists unaware of modern reconciliation of Bayes and Popper

December 17, 2015
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Gathering of philosophers and physicists unaware of modern reconciliation of Bayes and Popper

Hiro Minato points us to a news article by physicist Natalie Wolchover entitled “A Fight for the Soul of Science.” I have no problem with most of the article, which is a report about controversies within physics regarding the purported untestability of physics models such as string theory (as for example discussed by my Columbia […] The post Gathering of philosophers and physicists unaware of modern reconciliation of Bayes and…

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Recently in the sister blog

December 15, 2015
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Recently in the sister blog

How essentialism shapes our thinking. I think this idea, that people are natural “essentialists”—has important implications for both statistics and political science. In politics, there are these ideas that people have about Democrats, or Republicans, or Muslims, or various other groups. In statistics, as regular readers know, I continue to fight against discrete thinking, the […] The post Recently in the sister blog appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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1 cool trick for defining conditional probability

December 12, 2015
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Hi, this one comes up from time to time so I thought I’d devote a whole post to it. The question is: what is conditional probability? And here’s what I wrote: Everyone agrees that P(A,B) = P(A|B)*P(B). The question is, what comes first? In traditional probability textbooks, P(A,B) is defined first, then P(A|B) is defined […] The post 1 cool trick for defining conditional probability appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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Just Filling in the Bubbles

November 17, 2015
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Just Filling in the Bubbles

Collin Hitt writes: I study wrong answers, per your blog post today. My research focuses mostly on surveys of schoolchildren. I study the kids who appear to be just filling in the bubbles, who by accident actually reveal something of use for education researchers. Here’s his most recent paper, “Just Filling in the Bubbles: Using […] The post Just Filling in the Bubbles appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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“Using prediction markets to estimate the reproducibility of scientific research”

November 9, 2015
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A reporter sent me this new paper by Anna Dreber, Thomas Pfeiffer, Johan Almenberg, Siri Isaksson, Brad Wilson, Yiling Chen, Brian Nosek, and Magnus Johannesson, which begins: Concerns about a lack of reproducibility of statistically significant results have recently been raised in many fields, and it has been argued that this lack comes at substantial […] The post “Using prediction markets to estimate the reproducibility of scientific research” appeared first…

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Neuroscience research in Baltimore

November 4, 2015
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Joshua Vogelstein sends along these ads for students, research associates, and postdocs in his lab at Johns Hopkins University: Our goal is to work together with neuroexperimentalists to discover fundamental principles governing the relationship between mind and brain, via building and deploying open source petascale tools that run at scale on open access data. This […] The post Neuroscience research in Baltimore appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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