Posts Tagged ‘ Miscellaneous Science ’

The new quantitative journalism

September 7, 2016
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The first of the breed was Bill James. But now we have a bunch: Felix Salmon, Nate Silver, Amanda Cox, Carl Bialik, . . . . I put them in a different category than traditional science journalists such as Malcolm Gladwell, Gina Kolata, Stephen Dubner who are invested in the “scientist as hero” story, or […] The post The new quantitative journalism appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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“Brief, decontextualized instances of colaughter”

September 6, 2016
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“Brief, decontextualized instances of colaughter”

Bill Jefferys points me to this news article and writes: Looks at first glance like another NPR example of poor statistics, but who knows? I took a look and here were my thoughts, in order of occurrence: NPR . . . PPNAS . . . Also this: “the results were consistent across all the societies […] The post “Brief, decontextualized instances of colaughter” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Better to just not see the sausage get made

August 27, 2016
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Better to just not see the sausage get made

Mike Carniello writes: This article in the NYT leads to the full text, in which these statement are buried (no pun intended): What is the probability that two given texts were written by the same author? This was achieved by posing an alternative null hypothesis H0 (“both texts were written by the same author”) and […] The post Better to just not see the sausage get made appeared first on…

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Things that sound good but aren’t quite right: Art and research edition

August 19, 2016
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There are a lot of things you can say that sound very sensible but, upon reflection, are missing something. For example consider this blog comment from Chris G: Years ago I heard someone suggest these three questions for assessing a work of art: 1. What was the artist attempting to do? 2. Were they successful? […] The post Things that sound good but aren’t quite right: Art and research edition…

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An ethnographic study of the “open evidential culture” of research psychology

August 18, 2016
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Claude Fischer points me to this paper by David Peterson, “The Baby Factory: Difficult Research Objects, Disciplinary Standards, and the Production of Statistical Significance,” which begins: Science studies scholars have shown that the management of natural complexity in lab settings is accomplished through a mixture of technological standardization and tacit knowledge by lab workers. Yet […] The post An ethnographic study of the “open evidential culture” of research psychology appeared…

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Will youths who swill Red Bull become adult cocaine addicts?

August 12, 2016
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Will youths who swill Red Bull become adult cocaine addicts?

The above is the question asked to me by Michael Stutzer, who writes: I have attached an increasingly influential paper [“Effects of Adolescent Caffeine Consumption on Cocaine Sensitivity,” by Casey O’Neill, Sophia Levis, Drew Schreiner, Jose Amat, Steven Maier, and Ryan Bachtell] purporting to show the effects of caffeine use in adolescents (well, lab rats […] The post Will youths who swill Red Bull become adult cocaine addicts? appeared first…

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Are stereotypes statistically accurate?

August 11, 2016
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Apparently there’s a debate in psychology about the accuracy of stereotypes. Lin Bian and Andrei Cimpian write: In his book Social Perception and Social Reality, Lee Jussim suggests that people’s beliefs about various groups (i.e., their stereotypes) are largely accurate. We unpack this claim using the distinction between generic and statistical beliefs—a distinction supported by […] The post Are stereotypes statistically accurate? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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“What can recent replication failures tell us about the theoretical commitments of psychology?”

August 6, 2016
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“What can recent replication failures tell us about the theoretical commitments of psychology?”

Psychology/philosophy professor Stan Klein was motivated by our power pose discussion to send along this article which seems to me to be a worthy entry in what I’ve lately been calling “the literature of exasperation,” following in the tradition of Meehl etc. I offer one minor correction. Klein writes, “I have no doubt that the […] The post “What can recent replication failures tell us about the theoretical commitments of…

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Call for research on California water resources

July 28, 2016
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Patrick Atwater writes: I serve as a project manager of the California Data Collaborative, a coalition of water utilities working together to share data and ensure water reliability. We’ve put together a quick call for ideas on studies into the demand effects of water rates leveraging this unique database. California’s water world is highly fragmented […] The post Call for research on California water resources appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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“Children seek historical traces of owned objects”

July 24, 2016
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Recently in the sister blog: An object’s mental representation includes not just visible attributes but also its nonvisible history. The present studies tested whether preschoolers seek subtle indicators of an object’s history, such as a mark acquired during its handling. Five studies with 169 children 3–5 years of age and 97 college students found that […] The post “Children seek historical traces of owned objects” appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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