Posts Tagged ‘ Miscellaneous Science ’

How to discuss your research findings without getting into “hypothesis testing”?

October 21, 2017
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Zachary Horne writes: I regularly read your blog and have recently started using Stan. One thing that you’ve brought up in the discussion of nhst [null hypothesis significance testing] is the idea that hypothesis testing itself is problematic. However, because I am an experimental psychologist, one thing I do (or I think I’m doing anyway) […] The post How to discuss your research findings without getting into “hypothesis testing”? appeared…

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“La critique est la vie de la science”: I kinda get annoyed when people set themselves up as the voice of reason but don’t ever get around to explaining what’s the unreasonable thing they dislike.

October 20, 2017
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Someone pointed me to a blog post, Negative Psychology, from 2014 by Jim Coan about the replication crisis in psychology. My reaction: I find it hard to make sense of what he is saying because he doesn’t offer any examples of the “negative psychology” phenomenon that he discussing. I kinda get annoyed when people set […] The post “La critique est la vie de la science”: I kinda get annoyed…

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From perpetual motion machines to embodied cognition: The boundaries of pseudoscience are being pushed back into the trivial.

October 18, 2017
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From perpetual motion machines to embodied cognition:  The boundaries of pseudoscience are being pushed back into the trivial.

This exchange came from a comment thread last year. Diana Senechal points to this bizarre thing: Brian Little says in Me, Myself, and Us (regarding the “lemon introvert test”): One of the more interesting ways of informally assessing extraversion at the biogenic level is to do the lemon-drop test. [Description of experiment omitted from present […] The post From perpetual motion machines to embodied cognition: The boundaries of pseudoscience are…

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Analyzing New Zealand fatal traffic crashes in Stan with added open-access science

October 17, 2017
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Open-access science I’ll get to the meat of this post in a second, but I just wanted to highlight how the study I’m about to talk about was done in the open and how that helped everyone. Tim Makarios read the study and responded in the blog comments, Hold on. As I first skimmed this […] The post Analyzing New Zealand fatal traffic crashes in Stan with added open-access science…

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“I agree entirely that the way to go is to build some model of attitudes and how they’re affected by recent weather and to fit such a model to “thick” data—rather than to zip in and try to grab statistically significant stylized facts about people’s cognitive illusions in this area.”

October 14, 2017
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Angus Reynolds sent me a long email. I’ll share it in a moment but first here’s my reply: I don’t have much to say here, except that: 1. It’s nearly a year later but Christmas is coming again so here’s my post. 2. Yes, the effects of local weather on climate change attitudes do seem […] The post “I agree entirely that the way to go is to build some…

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When do we want evidence-based change? Not “after peer review”

October 13, 2017
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When do we want evidence-based change?  Not “after peer review”

Jonathan Falk sent me the above image in an email with subject line, “If this isn’t the picture for some future blog entry I’ll never forgive you.” This was a credible threat so here’s the post. But I don’t agree with that placard at all! Waiting for peer review is a bad idea for two […] The post When do we want evidence-based change? Not “after peer review” appeared first…

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Please contribute to this list of the top 10 do’s and don’ts for doing better science

October 10, 2017
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Demis Glasford does research in social psychology and asks: I was wondering if you had ever considered publishing a top ten ‘do’s/don’ts’ for those of us that are committed to doing better science, but don’t necessarily have the time to devote to all of these issues [of statistics and research methods]. Obviously, there is a […] The post Please contribute to this list of the top 10 do’s and don’ts…

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“Why bioRxiv can’t be the Central Service”

October 7, 2017
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I followed this link to Jordan Anaya’s page and there to this post on biology preprint servers. Anyway, as a fan of preprint servers I appreciate Anaya’s point-by-point discussion of why one particular server, bioRxiv (which I’d never heard of before but I guess is popular in biology), can’t do what some people want it […] The post “Why bioRxiv can’t be the Central Service” appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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BREAKING . . . . . . . PNAS updates its slogan!

October 4, 2017
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BREAKING . . . . . . . PNAS updates its slogan!

I’m so happy about this, no joke. Here’s the story. For awhile I’ve been getting annoyed by the junk science papers (for example, here, here, and here) that have been published by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences under the editorship of Susan T. Fiske. I’ve taken to calling it PPNAS (“Prestigious proceedings […] The post BREAKING . . . . . . . PNAS updates its slogan!…

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“Do statistical methods have an expiration date?” My talk at the University of Texas this Friday 2pm

October 2, 2017
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Fri 6 Oct at the Seay Auditorium (room SEA 4.244): Do statistical methods have an expiration date? Andrew Gelman, Department of Statistics and Department of Political Science, Columbia University There is a statistical crisis in science, particularly in psychology where many celebrated findings have failed to replicate, and where careful analysis has revealed that many […] The post “Do statistical methods have an expiration date?” My talk at the University…

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