Posts Tagged ‘ Statistical Graphics ’

What does CNN have in common with Carmen Reinhart, Kenneth Rogoff, and Richard Tol: They all made foolish, embarrassing errors that would never have happened had they been using R Markdown

September 19, 2014
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What does CNN have in common with Carmen Reinhart, Kenneth Rogoff, and Richard Tol:  They all made foolish, embarrassing errors that would never have happened had they been using R Markdown

Rachel Cunliffe shares this delight: Had the CNN team used an integrated statistical analysis and display system such as R Markdown, nobody would’ve needed to type in the numbers by hand, and the above embarrassment never would’ve occurred. And CNN should be embarrassed about this: it’s much worse than a simple typo, as it indicates […] The post What does CNN have in common with Carmen Reinhart, Kenneth Rogoff, and…

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What do you do to visualize uncertainty?

September 17, 2014
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Howard Wainer writes: What do you do to visualize uncertainty? Do you only use static methods (e.g. error bounds)? Or do you also make use of dynamic means (e.g. have the display vary over time proportional to the error, so you don’t know exactly where the top of the bar is, since it moves while […] The post What do you do to visualize uncertainty? appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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They know my email but they don’t know me

September 16, 2014
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This came (unsolicited) in the inbox today (actually, two months ago; we’re on a delay, as you’re probably aware), subject line “From PWC – animations of CEO opinions for 2014″: Good afternoon, I wanted to see if the data my colleague David sent to you was of any interest. I have attached here additional animated […] The post They know my email but they don’t know me appeared first on…

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mysterious shiny things

September 12, 2014
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mysterious shiny things

(Disclaimer: I’m new to Shiny, and blog posts, but I know something about geography.)  In the Shiny gallery, take a look at 2001 versus 2002. Something funny happens to Switzerland (and other European countries), in terms of the legend, it moves from Europe to the Middle East. Also, the legend color scheme switches.     […] The post mysterious shiny things appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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An exploratory technique for visualizing the distributions of 100 variables

September 10, 2014
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An exploratory technique for visualizing the distributions of 100 variables

In a previous blog post I showed how to order a set of variables by a statistic. After reshaping data, you can create a graph that contains box plots for many variables. Ordering the variables by some statistic (mean, median, variance,...) helps to differentiate and distinguish the variables. You can […]

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Order variables by values of a statistic

September 8, 2014
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Order variables by values of a statistic

When I create a graph of data that contains a categorical variable, I rarely want to display the categories in alphabetical order. For example, the box plot to the left is a plot of 10 standardized variables where the variables are ordered by their median value. The ordering makes it […]

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How to create a hexagonal bin plot in SAS

September 2, 2014
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How to create a hexagonal bin plot in SAS

While I was working on my recent blog post about two-dimensional binning, a colleague asked whether I would be discussing "the new hexagonal binning method that was added to the SURVEYREG procedure in SAS/STAT 13.2." I was intrigued: I was not aware that hexagonal binning had been added to a […]

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One of the worst infographics ever, but people don’t care?

August 28, 2014
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One of the worst infographics ever, but people don’t care?

This post is by Phil Price. Perhaps prompted by the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, this infographic has been making the rounds: I think this is one of the worst I have ever seen. I don’t know where it came from, so I can’t give credit/blame where it’s due. Let’s put aside the numbers themselves – […] The post One of the worst infographics ever, but people don’t care? appeared first…

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Creating heat maps in SAS/IML

August 20, 2014
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Creating heat maps in SAS/IML

In a previous blog post, I showed how to use the graph template language (GTL) in SAS to create heat maps with a continuous color ramp. SAS/IML 13.1 includes the HEATMAPCONT subroutine, which makes it easy to create heat maps with continuous color ramps from SAS/IML matrices. Typical usage includes […]

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Creating a basic heat map in SAS

August 18, 2014
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Creating a basic heat map in SAS

Heat maps have many uses. In a previous article, I showed how to use heat maps with a discrete color ramp to visualize matrices that have a small number of unique values, such as certain covariance matrices and sparse matrices. You can also use heat maps with a continuous color […]

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