Posts Tagged ‘ Statistical Graphics ’

Where the fat people at?

February 3, 2016
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Where the fat people at?

Pearly Dhingra points me to this article, “The Geographic Distribution of Obesity in the US and the Potential Regional Differences in Misreporting of Obesity,” by Anh Le, Suzanne Judd, David Allison, Reena Oza-Frank, Olivia Affuso, Monika Safford, Virginia Howard, and George Howard, who write: Data from BRFSS [the behavioral risk factor surveillance system] suggest that […] The post Where the fat people at? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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This graph is so ugly—and you’ll never guess where it appeared

January 23, 2016
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This graph is so ugly—and you’ll never guess where it appeared

Raghu Parthasarathy writes: I know you’re sick of seeing / being pointed to awful figures, but this one is an abomination of a sort I’ve never seen before: It’s a pie chart *and* a word cloud. In an actual research paper! Messy, illegible, and generally pointless. It’s Figure 1 of this paper (in Cell — […] The post This graph is so ugly—and you’ll never guess where it appeared appeared…

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One quick tip for building trust in missing-data imputations?

January 22, 2016
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Peter Liberman writes: I’m working on a paper that, in the absence of a single survey that measured the required combination of variables, analyzes data collected by separate, uncoordinated Knowledge Networks surveys in 2003. My co-author (a social psychologist who commissioned one of the surveys) and I obtained from KN unique id numbers for all […] The post One quick tip for building trust in missing-data imputations? appeared first on…

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If you’re using Stata and you want to do Bayes, you should be using StataStan

January 21, 2016
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If you’re using Stata and you want to do Bayes, you should be using StataStan

Robert Grant, Daniel Furr, Bob Carpenter, and I write: Stata users have access to two easy-to-use implementations of Bayesian inference: Stata’s native bayesmh function and StataStan, which calls the general Bayesian engine Stan. We compare these on two models that are important for education research: the Rasch model and the hierarchical Rasch model. Stan (as […] The post If you’re using Stata and you want to do Bayes, you should…

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Banking to 45 degrees: Aspect ratios for time series plots

January 20, 2016
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Banking to 45 degrees: Aspect ratios for time series plots

In SAS, the aspect ratio of a graph is the physical height of the graph divided by the physical width. Recently I demonstrated how to set the aspect ratio of graphs in SAS by using the ASPECT= option in PROC SGPLOT or by using the OVERLAYEQUATED statement in the Graph […] The post Banking to 45 degrees: Aspect ratios for time series plots appeared first on The DO Loop.

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Twelve posts from 2015 that deserve a second look

January 11, 2016
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Twelve posts from 2015 that deserve a second look

I began 2016 by compiling a list of popular articles from my blog in 2015. This "People's Choice" list contains many interesting articles, but some of my personal favorites did not make the list. Today I present the "Editor's Choice" list of articles that deserve a second look. I've grouped […] The post Twelve posts from 2015 that deserve a second look appeared first on The DO Loop.

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“Earlier you had waxed nostalgic for the days when people sent you bad graphs . . .”

January 2, 2016
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“Earlier you had waxed nostalgic for the days when people sent you bad graphs . . .”

Nadia Hassan writes: Earlier you had waxed nostalgic for the days when people sent you bad graphs. This [from Javier Zarracina] is not a stand-out on that front, but it is far from ideal: A lot of buzz in recent years about data journalism or quantitative journalism. There is a lot of issues to be […] The post “Earlier you had waxed nostalgic for the days when people sent you…

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Citation shocker: “The lifecycle of scholarly articles across fields of economic research”

December 28, 2015
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Citation shocker:  “The lifecycle of scholarly articles across fields of economic research”

David Backus writes: Check esp fig 2 here. He was pointing me to a post by Sebastian Galiani, Ramiro Galvez, and Maria Victoria Anauati called The lifecycle of scholarly articles across fields of economic research. And here’s fig 2: And, as usual, I duck all the interesting questions and move toward triviality: This should be […] The post Citation shocker: “The lifecycle of scholarly articles across fields of economic research”…

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Overlay categories on a histogram

December 9, 2015
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Overlay categories on a histogram

Recently Sanjay Matange blogged about how to color the bars of a histogram according to a gradient color ramp. Using the fact that bar charts and histograms look similar, he showed how to use PROC SGPLOT in SAS to plot a bar chart in which each bar is colored according […] The post Overlay categories on a histogram appeared first on The DO Loop.

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Size matters: Preserving the aspect ratio of the data in ODS graphics

November 30, 2015
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Size matters: Preserving the aspect ratio of the data in ODS graphics

When creating a statistical graphic such as a line plot or a scatter plot, it is sometimes important to preserve the aspect ratio of the data. For example, if the range of the X and Y variables are equal, it can be useful to display the data in a square […] The post Size matters: Preserving the aspect ratio of the data in ODS graphics appeared first on The DO…

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