Posts Tagged ‘ Statistical Graphics ’

Introducing shinyStan

March 2, 2015
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Introducing shinyStan

As a project for Andrew’s Statistical Communication and Graphics graduate course at Columbia, a few of us (Michael Andreae, Yuanjun Gao, Dongying Song, and I) had the goal of giving RStan’s print and plot functions a makeover. We ended up getting a bit carried away and instead we designed a graphical user interface for interactively exploring virtually […] The post Introducing shinyStan appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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Plotting multiple time series in SAS/IML (Wide to Long, Part 2)

February 27, 2015
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Plotting multiple time series in SAS/IML (Wide to Long, Part 2)

I recently wrote about how to overlay multiple curves on a single graph by reshaping wide data (with many variables) into long data (with a grouping variable). The implementation used PROC TRANSPOSE, which is a procedure in Base SAS. When you program in the SAS/IML language, you might encounter data […]

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The axes are labeled but I don’t know what the dots represent.

February 25, 2015
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The axes are labeled but I don’t know what the dots represent.

John Sukup writes: I came across a chart recently posted by Boston Consulting Group on LinkedIn and wondered what your take on it was. To me, it seems to fall into the “suspicious” category but thought you may have a different opinion. I replied that this one baffles me cos I don’t know what the […] The post The axes are labeled but I don’t know what the dots represent.…

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Plotting multiple series: Transforming data from wide to long

February 25, 2015
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Plotting multiple series: Transforming data from wide to long

Data. To a statistician, data are the observed values. To a SAS programmer, analyzing data requires knowledge of the values and how the data are arranged in a data set. Sometimes the data are in a "wide form" in which there are many variables. However, to perform a certain analysis […]

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Another example of why centering predictors can be good idea

February 19, 2015
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Another example of why centering predictors can be good idea

Andrew Dolman writes: Just in case you need another example of why it is important to consider what the intercepts in a model represent, here is a short comment I [Dolman] just got published correcting a misinterpretation of a simple linear model, that would not have happened if they had centered their predictor around a […] The post Another example of why centering predictors can be good idea appeared first…

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Binary heart in SAS

February 11, 2015
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Binary heart in SAS

The xkcd comic often makes me think and laugh. The comic features physics, math, and statistics among its topics. Many years ago, the comic showed a "binary heart": a grid of binary (0/1) numbers with the certain numbers colored red so that they formed a heart. Some years later, I […]

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Six quick tips to improve your regression modeling

January 29, 2015
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It’s Appendix A of ARM: A.1. Fit many models Think of a series of models, starting with the too-simple and continuing through to the hopelessly messy. Generally it’s a good idea to start simple. Or start complex if you’d like, but prepare to quickly drop things out and move to the simpler model to help […] The post Six quick tips to improve your regression modeling appeared first on Statistical…

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Twelve posts from 2014 that deserve a second look

January 12, 2015
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Twelve posts from 2014 that deserve a second look

I began 2015 by compiling a list of popular articles from my blog in 2014. Although this "People's Choice" list contains many interesting articles, some of my favorites did not make the list. Today I present the "Editor's Choice" list of articles that deserve a second look. I've highlighted one […]

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I like the clever way they tell the story. It’s a straightforward series of graphs but the reader has to figure out where to click and what to do, which makes the experience feel more like a voyage of discovery.

December 14, 2014
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I like the clever way they tell the story.  It’s a straightforward series of graphs but the reader has to figure out where to click and what to do, which makes the experience feel more like a voyage of discovery.

Jonathan Falk asks what I think of this animated slideshow by Matthew Klein on “How Americans Die”: Please click on the above to see the actual slideshow, as this static image does not do it justice. What do I think? Here was my reaction: It is good, but I was thrown off by the very […] The post I like the clever way they tell the story. It’s a straightforward…

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50 shades of gray goes pie-chart

November 22, 2014
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50 shades of gray goes pie-chart

Rogier Kievit sends in this under the heading, “Worst graph of the year . . . horribly unclear . . . Even the report doesn’t have a legend!”: My reply: It’s horrible but I still think the black-and-white Stroop test remains the worst visual display of all time: What’s particularly amusing about the Stroop image […] The post 50 shades of gray goes pie-chart appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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