Posts Tagged ‘ Statistical Graphics ’

Question about the secret weapon

June 23, 2017
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Question about the secret weapon

Micah Wright writes: I first encountered your explanation of secret weapon plots while I was browsing your blog in grad school, and later in your 2007 book with Jennifer Hill. I found them immediately compelling and intuitive, but I have been met with a lot of confusion and some skepticism when I’ve tried to use […] The post Question about the secret weapon appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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After Peptidegate, a proposed new slogan for PPNAS. And, as a bonus, a fun little graphics project.

June 21, 2017
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After Peptidegate, a proposed new slogan for PPNAS.  And, as a bonus, a fun little graphics project.

Someone pointed me to this post by “Neuroskeptic”: A new paper in the prestigious journal PNAS contains a rather glaring blooper. . . . right there in the abstract, which states that “three neuropeptides (β-endorphin, oxytocin, and dopamine) play particularly important roles” in human sociality. But dopamine is not a neuropeptide. Neither are serotonin or […] The post After Peptidegate, a proposed new slogan for PPNAS. And, as a bonus,…

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Hey—here are some tips on communicating data and statistics!

June 2, 2017
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This fall I’ll be again teaching the course, Communicating Data and Statistics. Here’s the rough course plan. I’ll tinker with it between now and September but this is the basic idea. (The course listing is here, but that online description is out of date; the course plan linked above is more accurate.) Here are the […] The post Hey—here are some tips on communicating data and statistics! appeared first on…

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You’ll never guess this one quick trick to diagnose problems with your graphs and then make improvements

June 2, 2017
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You’ll never guess this one quick trick to diagnose problems with your graphs and then make improvements

The trick is to consider graphs as comparisons. Here’s the story. This post from several years ago shows a confusing and misleading pair of pie charts from a Kenyan election: The quick reaction would be to say, ha ha, pie charts. But that’s not my point here. Sure, pie charts have problems and I think […] The post You’ll never guess this one quick trick to diagnose problems with your…

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More graphs of mortality trends

June 1, 2017
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More graphs of mortality trends

Corinne Riddell writes: In late March you released a series of plots visualizing mortality rates over time by race and gender. For almost a year now, we’ve been working on a similar project and have compiled all of our findings into an R shiny web app here, with a preprint of our first manuscript here. […] The post More graphs of mortality trends appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Click-through graphics: A demonstration visualization project for someone

May 31, 2017
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Hey, read this post. We discuss a shiny information visualization and propose “the click-through solution”: Start with a visually grabby graphic like the one on the linked page, something that takes advantage of some mystery to suck the viewer in. Then click and get a suite of statistical graphs that allow more direct visual comparisons […] The post Click-through graphics: A demonstration visualization project for someone appeared first on Statistical…

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On the SMOOTHCONNECT option in the SERIES statement

May 30, 2017
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On the SMOOTHCONNECT option in the SERIES statement

By default, when you use the SERIES statement in PROC SGPLOT to create a line plot, the observations are connected (in order) by straight line segments. However, SAS 9.4m1 introduced the SMOOTHCONNECT option which, as the name implies, uses a smooth curve to connect the observations. In Sanjay Matange's blog, [...] The post On the SMOOTHCONNECT option in the SERIES statement appeared first on The DO Loop.

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Mike Bostock graphs federal income tax brackets and tax rates, and I connect to some general principles of statistical graphics

May 28, 2017
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Mike Bostock graphs federal income tax brackets and tax rates, and I connect to some general principles of statistical graphics

Mike “d3” Bostock writes: Regarding the Vox graph on federal tax brackets, here is a quick-and-dirty visualization of effective tax rates for a given taxable income and year. However, there is a big caveat: estimating the effective tax rate based on actual income is much harder since it depends on the claimed deductions. This could […] The post Mike Bostock graphs federal income tax brackets and tax rates, and I…

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Taxes and data visualization

May 27, 2017
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Nadia Hassan writes: Vox has a graph of tax rates over time. Their visualizations do convey that tax rates for high earners have declined over time and tax brackets are fewer now, but it seems like there are more appealing and intuitive ways to display that. I agree. This visualization reminds me a lot of […] The post Taxes and data visualization appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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Visualizing your fitted Stan model using ShinyStan without interfering with your Rstudio session

May 25, 2017
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ShinyStan is great, but I don’t always use it because when you call it from R, it freezes up your R session until you close the ShinyStan window. But it turns out that it doesn’t have to be that way. Imad explains: You can open up a new session via the RStudio menu bar (Session […] The post Visualizing your fitted Stan model using ShinyStan without interfering with your Rstudio…

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