Posts Tagged ‘ Statistical Graphics ’

Integrating graphs into your workflow

April 28, 2016
By
Integrating graphs into your workflow

Discussion of statistical graphics typically focuses on individual graphs (for example here). But the real gain in your research comes from integrating graphs into your workflow. You want to be able to make the graphs you want, when you want them. At the same time, the graph have to be good enough that you can […] The post Integrating graphs into your workflow appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

Read more »

Set attributes of markers in PROC SGPLOT by using ODS style elements

April 11, 2016
By
Set attributes of markers in PROC SGPLOT by using ODS style elements

The SG procedures in SAS use aesthetically pleasing default colors, shapes, and styles, but sometimes it is necessary to override the default attributes. The MARKERATTRS= option enables you to override the default colors, symbols, and sizes of markers in scatter plots and other graphs. Similarly, the LINEATTRS= option enables you […] The post Set attributes of markers in PROC SGPLOT by using ODS style elements appeared first on The DO…

Read more »

Somebody’s reading our research.

April 5, 2016
By
Somebody’s reading our research.

See footnote 10 on page 5 of this GAO report. (The above graphs are just for age 45-54, which demonstrates an important thing about statistical graphics: They should be as self-contained as possible. Otherwise when the graph is separated from its ca...

Read more »

Numbers too good to be true? Or: Thanks, Obama!?

March 30, 2016
By
Numbers too good to be true? Or: Thanks, Obama!?

This post is by Phil. The “Affordable Care Act” a.k.a. “Obamacare” was passed in 2010, with its various pieces coming into play over the following few years. One of those pieces is penalties for hospitals that see high readmission rates. The theory here, or at least one of the theories here, was that hospitals could […] The post Numbers too good to be true? Or: Thanks, Obama!? appeared first on…

Read more »

Thinking about this beautiful text sentiment visualizer yields a surprising insight about statistical graphics

March 22, 2016
By
Thinking about this beautiful text sentiment visualizer yields a surprising insight about statistical graphics

Lucas Estevem set up this website in d3 as his final project in our statistical communication and graphics class this spring. Copy any text into the window, push the button, and you get this clean and attractive display showing the estimated positivity or negativity of each sentence. The length of each bar is some continuously-scaled […] The post Thinking about this beautiful text sentiment visualizer yields a surprising insight about…

Read more »

Comparative histograms: Panel and overlay histograms in SAS

March 9, 2016
By
Comparative histograms: Panel and  overlay histograms in SAS

You can use histograms to visualize the distribution of data. A comparative histogram enables you to compare two or more distributions, which usually represent subpopulations in the data. Common subpopulations include males versus females or a control group versus an experimental group. There are two common ways to construct a […] The post Comparative histograms: Panel and overlay histograms in SAS appeared first on The DO Loop.

Read more »

Graphical Data Analysis with R

February 27, 2016
By

Graphical Data Analysis with R: that’s the title of Antony Unwin’s new book. Here are the chapter titles: Ch01 Setting the Scene Ch03 Examining continuous variables Ch04 Displaying Categorial Data Ch05 Looking for Structure Ch06 Investigating Multivariate Continuous Data Ch07 Studying Multivariate Categorical Data Ch08 Getting an Overview Ch09 Graphics and Data Quality Ch10 Comparisons […] The post Graphical Data Analysis with R appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

Read more »

Job opening . . . for a data graphics editor!

February 26, 2016
By
Job opening . . . for a data graphics editor!

Larry Wheeler writes: I’m the managing editor at Health Affairs, a monthly peer-reviewed journal about health policy. We publish a lot of statistical graphics submitted with manuscripts from academic, industry, and government researchers. We have a job opening for a new position we’re calling “data graphics editor.” I’ve been having trouble attracting the right kind […] The post Job opening . . . for a data graphics editor! appeared first…

Read more »

Job opening . . . for a data graphics editor!

February 26, 2016
By
Job opening . . . for a data graphics editor!

Larry Wheeler writes: I’m the managing editor at Health Affairs, a monthly peer-reviewed journal about health policy. We publish a lot of statistical graphics submitted with manuscripts from academic, industry, and government researchers. We have a job opening for a new position we’re calling “data graphics editor.” I’ve been having trouble attracting the right kind […] The post Job opening . . . for a data graphics editor! appeared first…

Read more »

I wish Napoleon Bonaparte had never been born

February 19, 2016
By
I wish Napoleon Bonaparte had never been born

Not just for all the usual good reasons why the world needs fewer mass murderers, but also for the very specific reason that, had there been no Napoleon, there’d be no Napoleon-in-Russia graph, then no shining example for Ed Tufte to illustrate how people should make their graphs, then maybe graph-makers wouldn’t all feel that […] The post I wish Napoleon Bonaparte had never been born appeared first on Statistical…

Read more »


Subscribe

Email:

  Subscribe