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Tiny Data, Approximate Bayesian Computation and the Socks of Karl Broman

October 20, 2014
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Tiny Data, Approximate Bayesian Computation and the Socks of Karl Broman

Big data is all the rage, but sometimes you don’t have big data. Sometimes you don’t even have average size data. Sometimes you only have eleven unique socks: Karl Broman is here putting forward a very interesting problem. Interesting, not onl...

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hts with regressors

October 20, 2014
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hts with regressors

The hts package for R allows for forecasting hierarchical and grouped time series data. The idea is to generate forecasts for all series at all levels of aggregation without imposing the aggregation constraints, and then to reconcile the forecasts so they satisfy the aggregation constraints. (An introduction to reconciling hierarchical and grouped time series is […]

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PhilStat/Law: Nathan Schachtman: Acknowledging Multiple Comparisons in Statistical Analysis: Courts Can and Must

October 19, 2014
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PhilStat/Law: Nathan Schachtman: Acknowledging Multiple Comparisons in Statistical Analysis: Courts Can and Must

The following is from Nathan Schachtman’s legal blog, with various comments and added emphases (by me). He will try to reply to comments/queries. “Courts Can and Must Acknowledge Multiple Comparisons in Statistical Analyses” Nathan Schachtman, Esq., PC * October 14th, 2014 In excluding the proffered testimony of Dr. Anick Bérard, a Canadian perinatal epidemiologist in the […]

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Econometric Research Resources

October 17, 2014
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Econometric Research Resources

The following page, put together by John Kane at the Department of Economics, SUNY-Oswego, has some very useful links for econometrics students and researchers: Econometric Research Resources. © 2014, David E. Giles

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Beware Graphical Networks from Rating Scales without Concrete Referents

October 15, 2014
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Beware Graphical Networks from Rating Scales without Concrete Referents

We think of latent variables as hidden causes for the correlations among observed measures and rely on factor analysis to reveal the underlying structure. In a previous post, I borrowed an alternative metaphor from the R package qgraph and produce...

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Loi multinomiale et loi du chi-deux

October 15, 2014
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Loi multinomiale et loi du chi-deux

La semaine passée, en cours, j’avais rappelé que quand décrivait le compte de  variable multinomiales prenant modalités, la variable suit asymptotiquement une loi . Et plus généralement, on peut montrer que . Le soucis est que la matrice de variance covariance n’est pas la matrice identité. Pire que ça, elle n’est pas diagonale. Encore pire, elle n’est pas inversible. On ne peut alors pas utiliser le joli résultat qui nous…

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Congratulations to Dr Souhaib Ben Taieb

October 15, 2014
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Congratulations to Dr Souhaib Ben Taieb

Souhaib Ben Taieb has been awarded his doctorate at the Université libre de Bruxelles and so he is now officially Dr Ben Taieb! Although Souhaib lives in Brussels, and was a student at the Université libre de Bruxelles, I co-supervised his doctorate (along with Professor Gianluca Bontempi). Souhaib is the 19th PhD student of mine to […]

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1 in 5 million

October 14, 2014
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1 in 5 million

Earlier today, I've got an email from UCL Library Services, telling me that our research publications repository (UCL Discovery) has "recently passed the exciting milestone of 5 million downloads".As it happens, the 5 million-th download was our paper ...

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Operate on the body of a file but not the header

October 14, 2014
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Operate on the body of a file but not the header

Sometimes you need to run some UNIX command on a file but only want to operate on the body of the file, not the header. Create a file called body somewhere in your $PATH, make it executable, and add this to it:#!/bin/bashIFS= read -r headerprintf '%s\n...

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Count data are less useful than you think

October 14, 2014
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Count data are less useful than you think

A lot of Big Data analyses default to analyzing count data, e.g. number of searches of certain keywords, number of page views, number of clicks, number of complaints, etc. Doing so throws away much useful information, and frequently leads to bad analyses. *** I was reminded of the limitation of count data when writing about the following chart, which I praised on my sister blog as a good example of…

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