Statistics

Statistics Blogs

How effective are buybacks?

April 20, 2015
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How effective are buybacks?

Buybacks are when companies buy their own stocks. They can do this privately with stockholders, or simply purchase the stocks off the open market. Why? Companies buy back their own stocks because this supports the value of their stock (during tough times). It also reduces the total amount of equity, which improves metrics like Return on […]

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There’s no I in Mutual

April 20, 2015
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There’s no I in Mutual

Today I've received an email from a prospective PhD candidate, who says that he (or she) would like to do his (or her) PhD under my supervision on a topic of mutual interest. Except his (or her) interests are in Physics or Applied Mathematics.I know I'...

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NYT likes new AA study. Why I am not convinced.

April 20, 2015
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NYT likes new AA study. Why I am not convinced.

The New York Times plugged a study of the effectiveness of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) (link). The author (Austin Frakt) used this occasion to advocate "per-protocol" (PP) analysis over "intent-to-treat" (ITT) analysis. He does a good job explaining the potential downside of ITT, but got into a mess explaining PP and never properly addressed the downside of PP. It's an opportunity missed because I fear the article confuses readers even more…

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Reading fixed width formats in the Hadleyverse

April 19, 2015
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Reading fixed width formats in the Hadleyverse

This is an update to a previous post on reading fixed width formats in R. A new addition to the Hadleyverse is the package readr, which includes a function read_fwf to read fixed width format files. I’ll compare the LaF approach to the readr approach using the same dataset as before. The variable wt is […]

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Neyman: Distinguishing tests of statistical hypotheses and tests of significance might have been a lapse of someone’s pen

April 18, 2015
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Neyman: Distinguishing tests of statistical hypotheses and tests of significance might have been a lapse of someone’s pen

“Tests of Statistical Hypotheses and Their Use in Studies of Natural Phenomena” by Jerzy Neyman ABSTRACT. Contrary to ideas suggested by the title of the conference at which the present paper was presented, the author is not aware of a conceptual difference between a “test of a statistical hypothesis” and a “test of significance” and uses […]

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The Non-parametric Bootstrap as a Bayesian Model

April 17, 2015
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The Non-parametric Bootstrap as a Bayesian Model

The non-parametric bootstrap was my first love. I was lost in a muddy swamp of zs, ts and ps when I first saw her. Conceptually beautiful, simple to implement, easy to understand (I thought back then, at least). And when she whispered in my ear, “I...

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Stata goes Bayesian

April 17, 2015
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The other day, my colleague Gareth pointed out a very interesting piece of news. The new version of Stata is just out. Now, I'm not a super-Stata user (although I think it's a good package), but the interesting news is that they have now developed a sp...

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The many faces of the placebo response

April 17, 2015
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The many faces of the placebo response

This week, a study was published that claimed that the placebo response is mediated by genetics. Though I need to dig a little deeper and figure out exactly what this article is saying, I do think we need to take a step back and remember what can const...

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My Paper With Al Gol

April 16, 2015
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My Paper With Al Gol

My apologies for the broken link to my paper co-authored with Al Gol that was listed in the "April Reading" post on 1 April.This has now been fixed.© 2015, David E. Giles

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A Lot moRe Than Fifty Shades of Gray

April 16, 2015
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R has 108 shades of grey with an 'e', and 116 shades of gray with an 'a'. Fully 34% of named colors are gray/grey of some kind. So when can we expect R, the movie? # Blog appendix > temp = colors() > length(temp) #657 [1] 657 > > temp2 ...

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