Posts Tagged ‘ statistics ’

Is dplyr Easily Comprehensible?

August 20, 2017
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Is dplyr Easily Comprehensible?

dplyr is one of the most popular R packages. It is powerful and important. But is it in fact easily comprehensible? dplyr makes sense to those of us who use it a lot. And we can teach part time R users a lot of the common good use patterns. But, is it an easy task … Continue reading Is dplyr Easily Comprehensible?

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Use the LENGTH statement to pre-set the lengths of character variables in SAS – with a comparison to R

Use the LENGTH statement to pre-set the lengths of character variables in SAS – with a comparison to R

I often create character variables (i.e. variables with strings of text as their values) in SAS, and they sometimes don’t render as expected.  Here is an example involving the built-in data set SASHELP.CLASS. Here is the code: data c1;      set sashelp.class;      * define a new character variable to classify someone as tall or […]

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Thank You For The Very Nice Comment

August 16, 2017
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Thank You For The Very Nice Comment

Somebody nice reached out and gave us this wonderful feedback on our new Supervised Learning in R: Regression (paid) video course. Thanks for a wonderful course on DataCamp on XGBoost and Random forest. I was struggling with Xgboost earlier and Vtreat has made my life easy now :). Supervised Learning in R: Regression covers a … Continue reading Thank You For The Very Nice Comment

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Performance or Probativeness? E.S. Pearson’s Statistical Philosophy

August 16, 2017
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Performance or Probativeness?  E.S. Pearson’s Statistical Philosophy

This is a belated birthday post for E.S. Pearson (11 August 1895-12 June, 1980). It’s basically a post from 2012 which concerns an issue of interpretation (long-run performance vs probativeness) that’s badly confused these days. I’ll blog some E. Pearson items this week, including, my latest reflection on a historical anecdote regarding Egon and the woman he wanted […]

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Update on inference with Wasserstein distances

August 15, 2017
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Update on inference with Wasserstein distances

Hi again, As described in an earlier post, Espen Bernton, Mathieu Gerber and Christian P. Robert and I are exploring Wasserstein distances for parameter inference in generative models. Generally, ABC and indirect inference are fun to play with, as they make the user think about useful distances between data sets (i.i.d. or not), which is sort of implicit in classical […]

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A Stan case study, sort of: The probability my son will be stung by a bumblebee

August 14, 2017
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A Stan case study, sort of: The probability my son will be stung by a bumblebee

The Stan project for statistical computation has a great collection of curated case studies which anybody can contribute to, maybe even me, I was thinking. But I don’t have time to worry about that right now because I’m on vacation, being on the ...

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Unbiased MCMC with couplings

August 14, 2017
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Unbiased MCMC with couplings

    Hi, With John O’Leary and Yves Atchadé , we have just arXived our work on removing the bias of MCMC estimators. Here I’ll explain what this bias is about, and the benefits of removing it. What bias? An MCMC algorithm defines a Markov chain , with stationary distribution , so that time averages of the chain […]

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Supervised Learning in R: Regression

August 14, 2017
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Supervised Learning in R: Regression

We are very excited to announce a new (paid) Win-Vector LLC video training course: Supervised Learning in R: Regression now available on DataCamp The course is primarily authored by Dr. Nina Zumel (our chief of course design) with contributions from Dr. John Mount. This course will get you quickly up to speed covering: What is … Continue reading Supervised Learning in R: Regression

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More on “The Part-Time R-User”

August 6, 2017
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I have some more thoughts on the topic: “the part-time R-user.” I am thinking a bit more about the diversity R users. It occurs to me simply dividing R users into two groups, beginning and advanced, neglects a very important group: the part-time R user. This leaves us teachers and package developers with an unfortunate … Continue reading More on “The Part-Time R-User”

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Let’s Have Some Sympathy For The Part-time R User

August 4, 2017
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Let’s Have Some Sympathy For The Part-time R User

When I started writing about methods for better "parametric programming" interfaces for dplyr for R dplyr users in December of 2016 I encountered three divisions in the audience: dplyr users who had such a need, and wanted such extensions. dplyr users who did not have such a need ("we always know the column names"). dplyr … Continue reading Let’s Have Some Sympathy For The Part-time R User

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