Posts Tagged ‘ statistics ’

abcfr 0.9-3

August 26, 2015
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abcfr 0.9-3

In conjunction with our reliable ABC model choice via random forest paper, about to be resubmitted to Bioinformatics, we have contributed an R package called abcrf that produces a most likely model and its posterior probability out of an ABC reference table. In conjunction with the realisation that we could devise an approximation to the […]

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3 YEARS AGO (AUGUST 2012): MEMORY LANE

August 24, 2015
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3 YEARS AGO (AUGUST 2012): MEMORY LANE

3 years ago… MONTHLY MEMORY LANE: 3 years ago: August 2012. I mark in red three posts that seem most apt for general background on key issues in this blog.[1] Posts that are part of a “unit” or a group of “U-Phils” count as one (there are 4 U-Phils on Wasserman this time). Monthly memory lanes began at the blog’s 3-year anniversary in Sept, […]

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How to avoid making mountains out of molehills, using power/severity

August 21, 2015
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How to avoid making mountains out of molehills, using power/severity

A classic fallacy of rejection is taking a statistically significant result as evidence of a discrepancy from a test (or null) hypothesis larger than is warranted. Standard tests do have resources to combat this fallacy, but you won’t see them in textbook formulations. It’s not new statistical method, but new (and correct) interpretations of existing methods, that are needed. One […]

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Kickin’ it with elastic net regression

August 20, 2015
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Kickin’ it with elastic net regression

With the kind of data that I usually work with, overfitting regression models can be a huge problem if I'm not careful. Ridge regression is a really effective technique for thwarting overfitting. It does this by penalizing the L2 norm… Continue reading →

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Statistics, the Spooky Science

August 19, 2015
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Statistics, the Spooky Science

I was reading this interview Of Erich Lehmann yesterday: “A Conversation with Erich L. Lehmann” Lehmann: …I read over and over again that hypothesis testing is dead as a door nail, that nobody does hypothesis testing. I talk to Julie and she says that in the behaviorial sciences, hypothesis testing is what they do the […]

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Seattle histogram

August 16, 2015
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Seattle histogram

Filed under: pictures, R, Statistics, Travel Tagged: histogram, sculpture, Seattle, Washington Convention Center

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Calling Scala code from R using rscala

August 15, 2015
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Calling Scala code from R using rscala

Introduction In a previous post I looked at how to call Scala code from R using a CRAN package called jvmr. This package now seems to have been replaced by a new package called rscala. Like the old package, it requires a pre-existing Java installation. Unlike the old package, however, it no longer depends on … Continue reading Calling Scala code from R using rscala

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STAN trailer [PG+53]

August 13, 2015
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STAN trailer [PG+53]

[Heading off to mountainous areas with no Internet or phone connection, I posted a series of entries for the following week, starting with this brilliant trailer of Michael:] Filed under: Kids, R, Statistics, University life Tagged: Andrew Gelman, Hami...

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Odds and Probability: Commonly Misused Terms in Statistics – An Illustrative Example in Baseball

Odds and Probability: Commonly Misused Terms in Statistics – An Illustrative Example in Baseball

Yesterday, all 15 home teams in Major League Baseball won on the same day – the first such occurrence in history.  CTV News published an article written by Mike Fitzpatrick from The Associated Press that reported on this event.  The article states, “Viewing every game as a 50-50 proposition independent of all others, STATS figured the […]

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A. Spanos: Egon Pearson’s Neglected Contributions to Statistics

August 11, 2015
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A. Spanos: Egon Pearson’s Neglected Contributions to Statistics

Today is Egon Pearson’s birthday. I reblog a post by my colleague Aris Spanos from (8/18/12): “Egon Pearson’s Neglected Contributions to Statistics.”  Happy Birthday Egon Pearson!     Egon Pearson (11 August 1895 – 12 June 1980), is widely known today for his contribution in recasting of Fisher’s significance testing into the Neyman-Pearson (1933) theory of hypothesis testing. Occasionally, he […]

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