Posts Tagged ‘ economics ’

“Estimating trends in mortality for the bottom quartile, we found little evidence that survival probabilities declined dramatically.”

January 19, 2017
By
“Estimating trends in mortality for the bottom quartile, we found little evidence that survival probabilities declined dramatically.”

Last year there was much discussion here and elsewhere about a paper by Anne Case and Angus Deaton, who noticed that death rates for non-Hispanic white Americans aged 45-54 had been roughly flat since 1999, even while the death rates for this age category had been declining steadily in other countries and among nonwhite Americans. […] The post “Estimating trends in mortality for the bottom quartile, we found little evidence…

Read more »

Problems with randomized controlled trials (or any bounded statistical analysis) and thinking more seriously about story time

January 10, 2017
By

In 2010, I wrote: As a statistician, I was trained to think of randomized experimentation as representing the gold standard of knowledge in the social sciences, and, despite having seen occasional arguments to the contrary, I still hold that view, expressed pithily by Box, Hunter, and Hunter (1978) that “To find out what happens when […] The post Problems with randomized controlled trials (or any bounded statistical analysis) and thinking…

Read more »

Time Inc. stoops to the level of the American Society of Human Genetics and PPNAS?

January 9, 2017
By
Time Inc. stoops to the level of the American Society of Human Genetics and PPNAS?

The post Time Inc. stoops to the level of the American Society of Human Genetics and PPNAS? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

Read more »

Emails I never bothered to answer

December 26, 2016
By

So, this came in the email one day: Dear Professor Gelman, I would like to shortly introduce myself: I am editor in the ** Department at the publishing house ** (based in ** and **). As you may know, ** has taken over all journals of ** Press. We are currently restructuring some of the […] The post Emails I never bothered to answer appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

Read more »

Sethi on Schelling

December 23, 2016
By

Interesting appreciation from an economist. The post Sethi on Schelling appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

Read more »

“Dirty Money: The Role of Moral History in Economic Judgments”

December 23, 2016
By
“Dirty Money: The Role of Moral History in Economic Judgments”

Recently in the sister blog . . . Arber Tasimi and his coauthor write: Although traditional economic models posit that money is fungible, psychological research abounds with examples that deviate from this assumption. Across eight experiments, we provide evidence that people construe physical currency as carrying traces of its moral history. In Experiments 1 and […] The post “Dirty Money: The Role of Moral History in Economic Judgments” appeared first…

Read more »

An efficiency argument for post-publication review

December 16, 2016
By

This came up in a discussion last week: We were talking about problems with the review process in scientific journals, and a commenter suggested that prepublication review should be more rigorous: There are lot of statistical missteps you just can’t catch until you actually have the replication data in front of you to work with […] The post An efficiency argument for post-publication review appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

Read more »

Hark, hark! the p-value at heaven’s gate sings

December 16, 2016
By
Hark, hark! the p-value at heaven’s gate sings

Three different people pointed me to this post, in which food researcher and business school professor Brian Wansink advises Ph.D. students to “never say no”: When a research idea comes up, check it out, put some time into it and you might get some success. I like that advice and I agree with it. Or, […] The post Hark, hark! the p-value at heaven’s gate sings appeared first on Statistical…

Read more »

Story within story, bar within bar

December 14, 2016
By
Story within story, bar within bar

This Wall Street Journal offering caught my eye. It's the unusual way of displaying proportions. Your first impression is to interpret the graphic as a bar chart. But it really is a bar within a bar: the crux of the...

Read more »

Round things, square things

December 9, 2016
By
Round things, square things

The following chart traces the flow of funds into AI (artificial intelligence) startups. I found it on this webpage and it is attributed to Financial Times. Here, I apply the self-sufficiency test to show that the semicircles are playing no...

Read more »


Subscribe

Email:

  Subscribe