Posts Tagged ‘ economics ’

Getting into the head of the chart designer

September 19, 2017
By
Getting into the head of the chart designer

Kaiser Fung, creator of Junk Charts and Principal Analytics Prep, shows that maps are not the only way to deliver insights about geographical data.

Read more »

Causal inference using data from a non-representative sample

September 14, 2017
By

Dan Gibbons writes: I have been looking at using synthetic control estimates for estimating the effects of healthcare policies, particularly because for say county-level data the nontreated comparison units one would use in say a difference-in-differences estimator or quantile DID estimator (if one didn’t want to use the mean) are not especially clear. However, given […] The post Causal inference using data from a non-representative sample appeared first on Statistical…

Read more »

Looking for the bottom line

September 11, 2017
By

I recommend this discussion of how to summarize posterior distributions. I don’t recommend summarizing by the posterior probability that the new treatment is better than the old treatment, as that is not a bottom-line statement! The post Looking...

Read more »

Rosenbaum (1999): Choice as an Alternative to Control in Observational Studies

September 4, 2017
By

Winston Lin wrote in a blog comment earlier this year: Paul Rosenbaum’s 1999 paper “Choice as an Alternative to Control in Observational Studies” is really thoughtful and well-written. The comments and rejoinder include an interesting exchange between Manski and Rosenbaum on external validity and the role of theories. And here it is. Rosenbaum begins: In […] The post Rosenbaum (1999): Choice as an Alternative to Control in Observational Studies appeared…

Read more »

Causal identification + observational study + multilevel model

September 1, 2017
By

Sam Portnow writes: I am attempting to model the impact of tax benefits on children’s school readiness skills. Obviously, benefits themselves are biased, so I am trying to use the doubling of the maximum allowable additional child tax credit in 2003 to get an unbiased estimate of benefits. I was initially planning to attack this […] The post Causal identification + observational study + multilevel model appeared first on Statistical…

Read more »

“Mainstream medicine has its own share of unnecessary and unhelpful treatments”

August 29, 2017
By

I have a story and then a question. The story Susan Perry (link sent by Paul Alper) writes: Earlier this week, I [Perry] highlighted two articles that exposed the dubious history, medical ineffectiveness and potential health dangers of popular alternative “therapies.” Well, the same can be said of many mainstream conventional medical practices, as investigative […] The post “Mainstream medicine has its own share of unnecessary and unhelpful treatments” appeared…

Read more »

The salaries are attractive but the chart isn’t

August 29, 2017
By
The salaries are attractive but the chart isn’t

Kaiser Fung, founder of Junk Charts and Principal Analytics Prep, was impressed by the salaries but not by the visualization of engineering salaries in an IEEE journal.

Read more »

Details, details, details: giving Zillow a pie treatment

August 22, 2017
By
Details, details, details: giving Zillow a pie treatment

Kaiser Fung, founder of Junk Charts and Principal Analytics Prep, takes a detailed look at a Zillow chart, showing underwater homes and delinquent mortgages. Surprisingly, pie charts work well here.

Read more »

He wants some readings on the replication crisis that are accessible to college freshmen in economics

August 21, 2017
By

Harvey Rosen writes: My query is similar to the one from André Ariew that you posted on August 7, in which he asked if you could suggest readings for his graduate course in philosophy. I occasionally teach an undergraduate course on introductory microeconomics. I like to devote some time to discussing challenges to economists’ conventional […] The post He wants some readings on the replication crisis that are accessible to…

Read more »

Also holding back progress are those who make mistakes and then label correct arguments as “nonsensical.”

August 16, 2017
By

Here’s James Heckman in 2013: Also holding back progress are those who claim that Perry and ABC are experiments with samples too small to accurately predict widespread impact and return on investment. This is a nonsensical argument. Their relatively small sample sizes actually speak for — not against — the strength of their findings. Dramatic […] The post Also holding back progress are those who make mistakes and then label…

Read more »


Subscribe

Email:

  Subscribe