Posts Tagged ‘ economics ’

Conventions, novelty and the double edge

April 15, 2014
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Conventions, novelty and the double edge

This chart from Reuters is making the rounds on Twitter today. Quickly, tell me whether the Gun Law in Florida did well or poorly. That of course is the entire purpose of the chart. *** If you are like me,...

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“More research from the lunatic fringe”

April 11, 2014
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A linguist send me an email with the above title and a link to a paper, “The Effect of Language on Economic Behavior: Evidence from Savings Rates, Health Behaviors, and Retirement Assets,” by M. Keith Chen, which begins: Languages differ widely in the ways they encode time. I test the hypothesis that languages that grammatically […]The post “More research from the lunatic fringe” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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An old discussion of food deserts

April 6, 2014
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An old discussion of food deserts

I happened to be reading an old comment thread from 2012 (follow the link from here) and came across this amusing exchange: Perhaps this is the paper Jonathan was talking about? Here’s more from the thread: Anyway, I don’t have anything ...

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Bizarre academic spam

April 5, 2014
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I’ve been getting these sorts of emails every couple days lately: Respected Professor Gelman I am a senior undergraduate at Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur (IIT Kanpur). I am currently in the 8th Semester of my Master of Science (Integrated) in Mathematics and Scientific Computing program. I went through some of your previous work and […]The post Bizarre academic spam appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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Crime in the City of London – February 2014

March 29, 2014
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Crime in the City of London – February 2014

In my experience, central London is generally a safe place, but I was robbed there two years ago. A friend and I got lost on our way to a pancake house (serving, not made of), so I took my new iPhone out to consult a map. In a flash, a bicyclist zoomed past and plucked my […]

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How to Calculate Regression Coefficients without Data

March 25, 2014
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I’m going to derive the regression formulas without assuming “normality” and in such a way that the coefficients can be calculated from first principles without data. This’ll look magical to anyone who didn’t get the post ...

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Greg Mankiw’s utility function

March 23, 2014
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From 2010: Greg Mankiw writes (link from Tyler Cowen): Without any taxes, accepting that editor’s assignment would have yielded my children an extra $10,000. With taxes, it yields only $1,000. In effect, once the entire tax system is taken into account, my family’s marginal tax rate is about 90 percent. Is it any wonder that […]The post Greg Mankiw’s utility function appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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Picking pennies in front of a steamroller: A parable comes to life

March 22, 2014
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From 2011: Chapter 1 On Sunday we were over on 125 St so I stopped by the Jamaican beef patties place but they were closed. Jesus Taco was next door so I went there instead. What a mistake! I don’t know what Masanao and Yu-Sung could’ve been thinking. Anyway, then I had Jamaican beef patties […]The post Picking pennies in front of a steamroller: A parable comes to life appeared…

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Teaching Bayesian applied statistics to graduate students in political science, sociology, public health, education, economics, . . .

March 20, 2014
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Teaching Bayesian applied statistics to graduate students in political science, sociology, public health, education, economics, . . .

One of the most satisfying experiences for an academic is when someone asks a question that you’ve already answered. This happened in the comments today. Daniel Gotthardt wrote: So for applied stat courses like for sociologists, political scientists, psychologists and maybe also for economics, what do we actually want to accomplish with our intro courses? […]The post Teaching Bayesian applied statistics to graduate students in political science, sociology, public health,…

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The closer you look, the more confused

March 19, 2014
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The closer you look, the more confused

A twitter follower submitted this chart showing the shift in ethnicity in Texas: If you blinked, you probably took away the wrong message. Our "prior" tells us that the proportion of Hispanics has been rising quite rapidly in Texas. So,...

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