Posts Tagged ‘ economics ’

What doesn’t help readers (on the chart) and what does help (off the chart)

June 16, 2016
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What doesn’t help readers (on the chart) and what does help (off the chart)

Via Twitter, Bart S (@BartSchuijt) sent me to this TechCrunch article, which contains several uninspiring charts. The most disturbing one is this: There is a classic Tufte class here: only five numbers and yet the chart is so confusing. And...

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When doing causal inference, define your treatment decision and then consider the consequences that flow from it

May 26, 2016
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Danielle Fumia writes: I am a research at the Washington State Institute for Public Policy, and I work on research estimating the effect of college attendance on earnings. Many studies that examine the effect of attending college on earnings control for college degree receipt and work experience. These models seem to violate the practice you […] The post When doing causal inference, define your treatment decision and then consider the…

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Annals of really pitiful spammers

May 25, 2016
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Here it is: On May 18, 2016, at 8:38 AM, ** wrote: Dr. Gelman, I hope all is well. I looked at your paper on [COMPANY] and would be very interested in talking about having a short followup or a review article about this published in the next issue of the Medical Research Archives. It […] The post Annals of really pitiful spammers appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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The many-faced area chart is not usually your best choice

May 16, 2016
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The many-faced area chart is not usually your best choice

I found this chart about the exploding U.S. debt levels in ZeroHedge (link), sourced from Citibank. The top line story is pretty easy to see: total debt levels have almost reached the peak of the 1930s. (Ignore that dreadful labeling...

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Super-informative ping-pong graphic

May 11, 2016
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Super-informative ping-pong graphic

Via Twitter, Mike W. asked me to comment on this WSJ article about ping pong tables. According to the article, ping pong table sales track venture-capital deal flow: This chart is super-informative. I learned a lot from this chart, including:...

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What’s the motivation to do experiments on motivation?

May 10, 2016
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What’s the motivation to do experiments on motivation?

Bill Harris writes: Do you or your readers have any insights into the research that underlays Dan Pink’s work on motivation and Tom Wujec’s (or Peter Skillman’s) work on iterative development?  They make intuitive sense to me (but may be counterintuitive to others), but I don’t know much more about them. Pink’s work is summarized […] The post What’s the motivation to do experiments on motivation? appeared first on Statistical…

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Math on a plane!

May 8, 2016
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Math on a plane!

Paul Alper pointed me to this news article about an economist who got BUSTED for doing algebra on the plane. This dude was profiled by the lady sitting next to him who got suspicious of his incomprehensible formulas. I feel that way about a lot of econ research too, so I can see where she […] The post Math on a plane! appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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The surprising impact of mixing chart forms

May 3, 2016
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The surprising impact of mixing chart forms

At first glance, this Wall Street Journal chart seems unlikely to impress as it breaks a number of "rules of thumb" frequently espoused by dataviz experts. The inconsistency of mixing a line chart and a dot plot. The overplotting of...

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I owe it all to my Neanderthal genes

April 25, 2016
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I owe it all to my Neanderthal genes

Yesterday I posted a methods-focused item at the Monkey Cage, a follow-up of a post from a couple years ago arguing against some dramatic claims by economists Ashraf and Galor regarding the wealth of nations. No big deal, just some standard-issue skepticism. But for some reason this one caught fire—maybe somebody important linked to it, […] The post I owe it all to my Neanderthal genes appeared first on Statistical…

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Risk aversion is a two-way street

April 24, 2016
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Risk aversion is a two-way street

“Risk aversion” comes up a lot in microeconomics, but I think that it’s too broad a concept to do much for us. In many many cases, it seems to me that, when there is a decision option, either behavior X or behavior not-X can be thought as risk averse, depending on the framing. Thus, when […] The post Risk aversion is a two-way street appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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