Posts Tagged ‘ economics ’

“Now the company appears to have screwed up badly, and they’ve done it in pretty much exactly the way you would expect a company to screw up when it doesn’t drill down into the data.”

December 15, 2014
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Palko tells a good story: One of the accepted truths of the Netflix narrative is that CEO Reed Hastings is obsessed with data and everything the company does is data driven . . . Of course, all 21st century corporations are relatively data-driven. The fact that Netflix has large data sets on customer behavior does […] The post “Now the company appears to have screwed up badly, and they’ve done…

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Three axes or none

December 11, 2014
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Three axes or none

Catching up on some older submissions. Reader Nicholas S. saw this mind-boggling chart about Chris Nolan movies when Interstellar came out: This chart was part of an article by Vulture (link). It may be the first time I see not...

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Subtleties with measurement-error models for the evaluation of wacky claims

December 7, 2014
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Subtleties with measurement-error models for the evaluation of wacky claims

Paul Pudaite writes: In the latest Journal of the American Statistical Association (September 2014, Vol. 109 No. 507), Andrew Harvey and Alessandra Luati published a paper [preprint here] — “Filtering With Heavy Tails” — featuring the phenomenon you had asked about (“…(non-Gaussian) models for which, as y gets larger, E(x|y) can actually go back toward […] The post Subtleties with measurement-error models for the evaluation of wacky claims appeared first…

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Where a scatter plot fails

December 3, 2014
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Where a scatter plot fails

Found this chart in the magazine that Charles Schwab sends to customers: When there are two variables, and their correlation is of interest, a scatter plot is usually recommended. But not here! The text labels completely dominate this chart and...

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How to read (in quantitative social science). And by implication, how to write.

December 2, 2014
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How to read (in quantitative social science).  And by implication, how to write.

It all started when I was reading Chris Blattman’s blog and noticed this: One of the most provocative and interesting field experiments I [Blattman] have seen in this year: Poor people often do not make investments, even when returns are high. One possible explanation is that they have low aspirations and form mental models of […] The post How to read (in quantitative social science). And by implication, how to…

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An uninformative end state

November 25, 2014
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An uninformative end state

This chart cited by ZeroHedge feels like a parody. It's a bar chart that doesn't utilize the length of bars. It's a dot plot that doesn't utilize the position of dots. The range of commute times (between city centers and...

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Three good charts

November 21, 2014
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Alberto Cairo, Stephen McDaniel and I were asked about our "favorite" data visualization at the Qlik Conference this week. Stephen wrote up our answers here.

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4-year-old post on Arnold Zellner is oddly topical

November 19, 2014
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I’m re-running this Arnold Zellner obituary because it is relevant to two recent blog discussions: 1. Differences between econometrics and statistics 2. Old-fashioned sexism (of the quaint, not the horrible, variety) The post 4-year-old post on...

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Question about data mining bias in finance

November 16, 2014
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Finance professor Ravi Sastry writes: Let’s say we have N vectors of data, {y_1,y_2,…,y_N}. Each is used as the dependent variable in a series of otherwise identical OLS regressions, yielding t-statistics on some parameter of interest, theta: {t_1,t_2,…,t_N}. The maximum t-stat is denoted t_n*, and the corresponding data are y_n*. These are reported publicly, as […] The post Question about data mining bias in finance appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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Circular but insufficient

November 13, 2014
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Circular but insufficient

One of my students analyzed the following Economist chart for her homework. I was looking for it online, and found an interactive version that is a bit different (link). Here are three screen shots from the online version for years...

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