Posts Tagged ‘ economics ’

Adiabatic as I wanna be: Or, how is a chess rating like classical economics?

March 24, 2015
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Adiabatic as I wanna be:  Or, how is a chess rating like classical economics?

Chess ratings are all about change. Did your rating go up, did it go down, have you reached 2000, who’s hot, who’s not, and so on. If nobody’s abilities were changing, chess ratings would be boring, they’d be nothing but a noisy measure, and watching your rating change would be as exciting as watching a […] The post Adiabatic as I wanna be: Or, how is a chess rating like…

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Bumps chart goes mainstream

March 19, 2015
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Bumps chart goes mainstream

It’s a happy day when one of my favorite chart types, the Bumps chart, makes it to the Wall Street Journal, and the front page no less! (Link to article) This chart shows the ground shifting in global auto production...

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What do CERN, the ISS, and Stephen Fry have in Common?

March 18, 2015
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What do CERN, the ISS, and Stephen Fry have in Common?

You’ll have to read the New Yorker article on Richard M. Stallman and the The GNU Manifesto by Maria Bustillos to find out! And what’s up with Tim O’Reilly’s comments about the Old Testment vs. New Testament?   That’s an ad hominem attack of the highest order, guaranteed to get the Judeo-Christians even more riled […] The post What do CERN, the ISS, and Stephen Fry have in Common? appeared…

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Observing Rosling’s Current Visual Style

March 12, 2015
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Observing Rosling’s Current Visual Style

On the sister blog, I wrote about Hans Rosling’s recent presentation in New York (link). I noted that Rosling has apparently simplified his visual palette. Rosling is best known as the developer of the Gapminder tool, used to visualize global...

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Inverting the axis for goodness sake

March 3, 2015
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Inverting the axis for goodness sake

Last week, Wall Street Journal inverted the vertical axis in one of their charts. The last time someone did this, a huge uproar ensued. (The Florida gun deaths chart discussed here.) This time, the act appeared to have caused barely...

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A startling chart about income inequality, with interpretative difficulties

February 24, 2015
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A startling chart about income inequality, with interpretative difficulties

Reader Robbi B. submitted the following chart posted to Twitter by Branko Milanovic: The chart took a little time to figure out. This isn't a bad chart. Robbi wondered if there are alternative ways to plot this information. The U.S....

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“Unbiasedness”: You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means. [My talk tomorrow in the Princeton economics department]

February 23, 2015
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“Unbiasedness”:  You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means. [My talk tomorrow in the Princeton economics department]

The talk is tomorrow, Tues 24 Feb, 2:40-4:00pm in 200 Fisher Hall: “Unbiasedness”: You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means. Andrew Gelman, Department of Statistics and Department of Political Science, Columbia University Minimizing bias is the traditional first goal of econometrics. In many cases, though, the […] The post “Unbiasedness”: You keep using that word. I do not think it means…

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An unsuccessful adaptation of a classic

February 18, 2015
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An unsuccessful adaptation of a classic

Found this chart in Hemispheres magazine on board a United flight: A quick self-sufficiency test reveals the biggest shortcoming of this visual presentation. What would you guess is the difference in areas between the two white-ish sectors (pointing at 9...

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Oh, it’s so frustrating when you’re trying to help someone out, and then you realize you’re dealing with a snake.

February 1, 2015
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This happens sometimes. Someone comes to you with a request, maybe it’s a student or a potential student or just someone who has a question relating to your field of expertise. You’re in a good mood so you decide to help out, or maybe you feel it’s your duty to be helpful, or, who knows, […] The post Oh, it’s so frustrating when you’re trying to help someone out, and…

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Economics/sociology phrase book

January 31, 2015
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Mark Palko points me to this amusing document from Jeffrey Smith and Kermit Daniel, translating sociology jargon into economics and vice-versa. Lots of good jokes there. Along these lines, I’ve always been bothered by economists’ phrase “willingness to pay” which, in practice, often means “ability to pay.” And, of course, “earnings” which means “how much […] The post Economics/sociology phrase book appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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