Posts Tagged ‘ economics ’

Spam!

August 2, 2015
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The following bit of irrelevance appeared on the stan-users mailing list: On Jun 11, 2015, at 11:29 AM, Joanna Caldwell wrote: Webinar: Tips & Tricks to Improve Your Logistic Regression . . . Registration Link: . . . Abstract: Logistic regression is a commonly used tool to analyze binary classification problems. However, logistic regression still […] The post Spam! appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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Annals of Spam

July 18, 2015
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I received the following email with subject line, “Andrew, just finished ‘Foreign language skills …'”: Andrew, Just finished http://andrewgelman.com/2010/12/24/foreign_languag/ This leads to the silliness of considering foreign language skills as a purely positional good or as a method for selecting students, while forgetting the direct benefits of being able to communicate in various ways with […] The post Annals of Spam appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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Survey weighting and regression modeling

July 14, 2015
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Yphtach Lelkes points us to a recent article on survey weighting by three economists, Gary Solon, Steven Haider, and Jeffrey Wooldridge, who write: We start by distinguishing two purposes of estimation: to estimate population descriptive statistics and to estimate causal effects. In the former type of research, weighting is called for when it is needed […] The post Survey weighting and regression modeling appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Economists betting on replication

July 10, 2015
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Mark Patterson writes: A bunch of folks are collaborating on a project to replicate 18 experimental studies published in prominent Econ journals (mostly American Economic Review, a few Quarterly Journal of Economics). This is already pretty exciting, but the really cool bit is they’re opening a market (with real money) to predict which studies will […] The post Economists betting on replication appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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Visualizing survey results excellently

July 3, 2015
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Visualizing survey results excellently

Surveys generate a lot of data. And, if you have used a survey vendor, you know they generate a ton of charts. I was in Germany to attend the Data Meets Viz workshop organized by Antony Unwin. Paul and Sascha...

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In which a complete stranger offers me a bet

June 19, 2015
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In which a complete stranger offers me a bet

Piotr Mitros wrote to Deb and me: I read, with pleasure, your article about the impossibility of biasing a coin. I’m curious as to whether researchers believe what they write. Would you be willing to place some form of iterated bet? For example: I provide a two-sided coin and a table. The table looks like […] The post In which a complete stranger offers me a bet appeared first on…

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Kaiser’s beef

May 23, 2015
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Kaiser’s beef

The Numbersense guy writes in: Have you seen this? It has one of your pet peeves… let’s draw some data-driven line in the categorical variable and show significance. To make it worse, he adds a final paragraph saying essentially this is just a silly exercise that I hastily put together and don’t take it seriously! […] The post Kaiser’s beef appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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Creativity is the ability to see relationships where none exist

May 22, 2015
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Creativity is the ability to see relationships where none exist

Brent Goldfarb and Andrew King, in a paper to appear in the journal Strategic Management, write: In a recent issue of this journal, Bettis (2012) reports a conversation with a graduate student who forthrightly announced that he had been trained by faculty to “search for asterisks”. The student explained that he sifted through large databases […] The post Creativity is the ability to see relationships where none exist appeared first…

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Shaking up expectations for pension benefits

May 20, 2015
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Shaking up expectations for pension benefits

Ted Ballachine wrote me about his website Pension360 pointing me to a recent attempt at visualizing pension benefits in various retirement systems in the state of Illinois. The link to the blog post is here. One of the things they...

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I actually think this infographic is ok

May 15, 2015
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Under the heading, “bad charts,” Mark Duckenfield links to this display by Quoctrung Bui and writes: So much to go with here, but I [Duckenfield] would just highlight the bars as the most egregious problem as it is implied that the same number of people are in each category. Obviously that is not the case […] The post I actually think this infographic is ok appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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