Posts Tagged ‘ economics ’

Andrew Gelman is not the plagiarism police because there is no such thing as the plagiarism police.

September 23, 2016
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Andrew Gelman is not the plagiarism police because there is no such thing as the plagiarism police.

The title of this post is a line that Thomas Basbøll wrote a couple years ago. Before I go on, let me say that the fact that I have not investigated this case in detail is not meant to imply that it’s not important or that it’s not worth investigating. It’s just not something that […] The post Andrew Gelman is not the plagiarism police because there is no such…

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Multicollinearity causing risk and uncertainty

September 22, 2016
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Alexia Gaudeul writes: Maybe you will find this interesting / amusing / frightening, but the Journal of Risk and Uncertainty recently published a paper with a rather obvious multicollinearity problem. The issue does not come up that often in the published literature, so I thought you might find it interesting for your blog. The paper […] The post Multicollinearity causing risk and uncertainty appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Depicting imbalance, straying from the standard chart

September 19, 2016
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Depicting imbalance, straying from the standard chart

My friend Tonny M. sent me a tip to two pretty nice charts depicting the state of U.S. healthcare spending (link). The first shows U.S. as an outlier: This chart is a replica of the Lane Kenworthy chart, with some...

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Exploration vs. exploitation tradeoff

September 9, 2016
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Exploration vs. exploitation tradeoff

Alon Levy (link from Palko) looks into “Hyperloop, a loopy intercity rail transit idea proposed by Tesla Motors’ Elon Musk, an entrepreneur who hopes to make a living some day building cars,” and writes: There is a belief within American media that a successful person can succeed at anything. He (and it’s invariably he) is […] The post Exploration vs. exploitation tradeoff appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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Graphical inequity ruins the chart

September 9, 2016
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Graphical inequity ruins the chart

This Economist chart has a great concept but I find it difficult to find the story: (link) I am a fan of color-coding the text as they have done here so that part is good. The journalist has this neat...

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In Bayesian regression, it’s easy to account for measurement error

September 4, 2016
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In Bayesian regression, it’s easy to account for measurement error

Mikhail Balyasin writes: I have come across this paper by Jacob Westfall and Tal Yarkoni, “Statistically Controlling for Confounding Constructs Is Harder than You Think.” I think it talks about very similar issues you raise on your blog, but in this case they advise to use SEM [structural equation models] to control for confounding constructs. […] The post In Bayesian regression, it’s easy to account for measurement error appeared first…

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Participate in this cool experiment about online privacy

September 2, 2016
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Sharad Goel writes: We just launched an experiment about online privacy, and I was wondering if you could post this on your blog. In a nutshell, people upload their browsing history, which we then fingerprint and compare to the profiles of 100s of millions of Twitter users to find a match. Browsing history is something […] The post Participate in this cool experiment about online privacy appeared first on Statistical…

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Birthdays and heat waves

August 29, 2016
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I mentioned the birthdays example in a talk the other day, and Hal Varian pointed me to some research by David Lam and Jeffrey Miron, papers from the 1990s with titles like Seasonality of Births in Human Populations, The Effect of Temperature on Human Fertility, and Modeling Seasonality in Fecundability, Conceptions, and Births. Aki and […] The post Birthdays and heat waves appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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Who owns your code and text and who can use it legally? Copyright and licensing basics for open-source

August 28, 2016
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Who owns your code and text and who can use it legally?  Copyright and licensing basics for open-source

I am not a lawyer (“IANAL” in web-speak); but even if I were, you should take this with a grain of salt (same way you take everything you hear from anyone). If you want the straight dope for U.S. law, see the U.S. government Copyright FAQ; it’s surprisingly clear for government legalese. What is copyrighted? […] The post Who owns your code and text and who can use it legally?…

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Oooh, it burns me up

August 28, 2016
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Oooh, it burns me up

If any of you are members of the Marketing Research Association, could you please contact them and ask them to change their position on this issue: I have a feeling they won’t mind if you call them at home. With an autodialer. “Pollsters now must hand-dial cellphones, at great expense,” indeed. It’s that expensive to […] The post Oooh, it burns me up appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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