Posts Tagged ‘ economics ’

Bigmilk strikes again

July 16, 2016
By
Bigmilk strikes again

The post Bigmilk strikes again appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

Read more »

About that claim that police are less likely to shoot blacks than whites

July 14, 2016
By
About that claim that police are less likely to shoot blacks than whites

Josh Miller writes: Did you see this splashy NYT headline, “Surprising New Evidence Shows Bias in Police Use of Force but Not in Shootings”? It’s actually looks like a cool study overall, with granular data, and a ton of leg work, and rich set of results that extend beyond the attention grabbing headline that is […] The post About that claim that police are less likely to shoot blacks than…

Read more »

Of polls and prediction markets: More on #BrexitFail

July 13, 2016
By
Of polls and prediction markets:  More on #BrexitFail

David “Xbox poll” Rothschild and I wrote an article for Slate on how political prediction markets can get things wrong. The short story is that in settings where direct information is not easily available (for example, in elections where polls are not viewed as trustworthy forecasts, whether because of problems in polling or anticipated volatility […] The post Of polls and prediction markets: More on #BrexitFail appeared first on Statistical…

Read more »

Causal and predictive inference in policy research

July 9, 2016
By

Todd Rogers pointed me to a paper by Jon Kleinberg, Jens Ludwig, Sendhil Mullainathan, and Ziad Obermeyer that begins: Empirical policy research often focuses on causal inference. Since policy choices seem to depend on understanding the counterfactual—what happens with and without a policy—this tight link of causality and policy seems natural. While this link holds […] The post Causal and predictive inference in policy research appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

Read more »

Causal mediation

July 7, 2016
By
Causal mediation

Judea Pearl points me to this discussion with Kosuke Imai at a conference on causal mediation. I continue to think that the most useful way to think about mediation is in terms of a joint or multivariate outcome, and I continue to think that if we want to understand mediation, we need to think about […] The post Causal mediation appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

Read more »

Confusion is not limited to complex dataviz

July 7, 2016
By
Confusion is not limited to complex dataviz

This chart looks simple and harmless but I find it disarming. I usually love the cheeky titles in the Economist but this title is very destructive to the data visualization. The chart has nothing to do with credit scores. In...

Read more »

“I would like to share some sad stories from economics related to these issues”

July 6, 2016
By
“I would like to share some sad stories from economics related to these issues”

Per Pettersson-Lidbom from the Department of Economics at Stockholm University writes: I have followed your discussions about replication, criticism, and the self-correcting process of science. I would like to share some sad stories from economics related to these issues. It is the stories about three papers published in highly respected journals, i.e., the study by […] The post “I would like to share some sad stories from economics related to…

Read more »

Why experimental economics might well be doing better than social psychology when it comes to replication

June 30, 2016
By

There’s a new paper, “Evaluating replicability of laboratory experiments in economics,” by Colin Camerer, Anna Dreber, Eskil Forsell, Teck-Hua Ho, Jürgen Huber, Magnus Johannesson, Michael Kirchler, Johan Almenberg, Adam Altmejd, Taizan Chan, Emma Heikensten, Felix Holzmeister, Taisuke Imai, Siri Isaksson, Gideon Nave, Thomas Pfeiffer, Michael Razen, Hang Wu, which three different people sent to me, […] The post Why experimental economics might well be doing better than social psychology when…

Read more »

When are people gonna realize their studies are dead on arrival?

June 26, 2016
By
When are people gonna realize their studies are dead on arrival?

A comment at Thomas Lumley’s blog pointed me to this discussion by Terry Burnham with an interesting story of some flashy psychology research that failed to replicate. Here’s Burnham: [In his popular book, psychologist Daniel] Kahneman discussed an intriguing finding that people score higher on a test if the questions are hard to read. The […] The post When are people gonna realize their studies are dead on arrival? appeared…

Read more »

What doesn’t help readers (on the chart) and what does help (off the chart)

June 16, 2016
By
What doesn’t help readers (on the chart) and what does help (off the chart)

Via Twitter, Bart S (@BartSchuijt) sent me to this TechCrunch article, which contains several uninspiring charts. The most disturbing one is this: There is a classic Tufte class here: only five numbers and yet the chart is so confusing. And...

Read more »


Subscribe

Email:

  Subscribe