Posts Tagged ‘ economics ’

The surprising impact of mixing chart forms

May 3, 2016
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The surprising impact of mixing chart forms

At first glance, this Wall Street Journal chart seems unlikely to impress as it breaks a number of "rules of thumb" frequently espoused by dataviz experts. The inconsistency of mixing a line chart and a dot plot. The overplotting of...

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I owe it all to my Neanderthal genes

April 25, 2016
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I owe it all to my Neanderthal genes

Yesterday I posted a methods-focused item at the Monkey Cage, a follow-up of a post from a couple years ago arguing against some dramatic claims by economists Ashraf and Galor regarding the wealth of nations. No big deal, just some standard-issue skepticism. But for some reason this one caught fire—maybe somebody important linked to it, […] The post I owe it all to my Neanderthal genes appeared first on Statistical…

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Risk aversion is a two-way street

April 24, 2016
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Risk aversion is a two-way street

“Risk aversion” comes up a lot in microeconomics, but I think that it’s too broad a concept to do much for us. In many many cases, it seems to me that, when there is a decision option, either behavior X or behavior not-X can be thought as risk averse, depending on the framing. Thus, when […] The post Risk aversion is a two-way street appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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“Cancer Research Is Broken”

April 20, 2016
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Michael Oakes pointed me to this excellent news article by Daniel Engber, subtitled, “There’s a replication crisis in biomedicine—and no one even knows how deep it runs.” Engber suggests that the replication problem in biomedical research is worse than the much-publicized replication problem in psychology. One reason, which I didn’t see Engber discussing, is financial […] The post “Cancer Research Is Broken” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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GIGO

April 11, 2016
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GIGO

Lee Wilkinson writes: In the latest issue of Harvard Magazine (http://www.harvardmagazine.com/2015/12/cambridge-02138), a letter writer (David W. Pittelli) comments under the section “Social Progress Index”: We are informed by Harvard Magazine (November-December 2015, page 15) that the country with the best “Health and Wellness” (“Do people live long and healthy lives?”) is Peru, while the United […] The post GIGO appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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Black Box Challenge

April 9, 2016
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Black Box Challenge

Georgy Cheremovskiy writes: I’m one of the organizers of an unusual reinforcement learning competition named Black Box Challenge. The conception is simple — one need to program an agent that can play a game with unknown rules. At each time step agent is given an environment state vector and has a few possible actions. The […] The post Black Box Challenge appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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John Yoo blogging

April 8, 2016
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John Yoo blogging

Jonathan Falk sends along this gem: Judicial Torture as a Screening Device Kong-Pin Chen / Tsung-Sheng Tsai Judicial torture to extract information or to elicit a confession was a common practice in pre-modern societies, both in the east and the west. This paper proposes a positive theory for judicial torture. It is shown that torture […] The post John Yoo blogging appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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These celebrity photos are incredible: Type S errors in use!

April 6, 2016
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These celebrity photos are incredible:  Type S errors in use!

Kaveh sends along this, from a recent talk at Berkeley by Katherine Casey: It’s so gratifying to see this sort of thing in common use, only 15 years after Francis and I introduced the idea (and see also this more recent paper with Carlin). The p...

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Gresham’s Law of experimental methods

March 31, 2016
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Gresham’s Law of experimental methods

A cognitive scientist writes: You’ll be interested to see a comment from one of my students, who’s trying to follow all your advice: It’s hard to see all this bullshit in top journals, while I see that if I do things right, it takes a long time, and I don’t have the beautiful results these […] The post Gresham’s Law of experimental methods appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Data-dependent prior as an approximation to hierarchical model

March 25, 2016
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Andy Solow writes: I have a question about Bayesian statistics. Why is it wrong to use the same data to formulate the prior and to update it to the posterior? I am having a hard time coming up with – or finding in the literature – a formal reason. I asked him to elaborate and […] The post Data-dependent prior as an approximation to hierarchical model appeared first on Statistical…

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