Posts Tagged ‘ economics ’

Postdoc opportunity with Sophia Rabe-Hesketh and me in Berkeley!

January 31, 2016
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Sophia writes: Mark Wilson, Zach Pardos and I are looking for a postdoc to work with us on a range of projects related to educational assessment and statistical modeling, such as Bayesian modeling in Stan (joint with Andrew Gelman). See here for more details. We will accept applications until February 26. The position is for […] The post Postdoc opportunity with Sophia Rabe-Hesketh and me in Berkeley! appeared first on…

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Empirical violation of Arrow’s theorem!

January 31, 2016
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Empirical violation of Arrow’s theorem!

Regular blog readers know about Arrow’s theorem, which is that any result can be published no more than five times. Well . . . I happened to be checking out Retraction Watch the other day and came across this: “Exactly the same clinical study” published six times Here’s the retraction notice in the journal Inflammation: […] The post Empirical violation of Arrow’s theorem! appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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“Why IT Fumbles Analytics Projects”

January 27, 2016
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“Why IT Fumbles Analytics Projects”

Someone pointed me to this Harvard Business Review article by Donald Marchand and Joe Peppard, “Why IT Fumbles Analytics,” which begins as follows: In their quest to extract insights from the massive amounts of data now available from internal and external sources, many companies are spending heavily on IT tools and hiring data scientists. Yet […] The post “Why IT Fumbles Analytics Projects” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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2 new reasons not to trust published p-values: You won’t believe what this rogue economist has to say.

January 24, 2016
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Political scientist Anselm Rink points me to this paper by economist Alwyn Young which is entitled, “Channelling Fisher: Randomization Tests and the Statistical Insignificance of Seemingly Significant Experimental Results,” and begins, I [Young] follow R.A. Fisher’s The Design of Experiments, using randomization statistical inference to test the null hypothesis of no treatment effect in a […] The post 2 new reasons not to trust published p-values: You won’t believe what…

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2 new reasons not to trust published p-values: You won’t believe what this rogue economist has to say.

January 24, 2016
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Political scientist Anselm Rink points me to this paper by economist Alwyn Young which is entitled, “Channelling Fisher: Randomization Tests and the Statistical Insignificance of Seemingly Significant Experimental Results,” and begins, I [Young] follow R.A. Fisher’s The Design of Experiments, using randomization statistical inference to test the null hypothesis of no treatment effect in a […] The post 2 new reasons not to trust published p-values: You won’t believe what…

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My namesake doesn’t seem to understand the principles of decision analysis

January 18, 2016
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My namesake doesn’t seem to understand the principles of decision analysis

It says “Never miss another deadline.” But if you really could never miss your deadlines, you’d just set your deadlines earlier, no? It’s statics vs. dynamics all over again. That said, this advice seems reasonable: The author has also developed a foolproof method of structuring your writing, so that you make effective use of your […] The post My namesake doesn’t seem to understand the principles of decision analysis appeared…

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MTA sucks

January 14, 2016
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MTA sucks

They had a sign on the wall promoting this Easy Pay express metrocard that would auto-refill and I was like, cool, so when I got to the ofc I looked it up, found the sign-up page, gave my information and chose the EasyPayXpress PayPerRide Plan, clicked on lu et endendu or whatever they call it, […] The post MTA sucks appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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Treating absolute and relative data simultaneously

January 11, 2016
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Treating absolute and relative data simultaneously

A friend asked me to comment on the following chart: Specifically, he points out the challenge of trying to convey both absolute and relative metrics for a given data series. This chart presents projections of growth in the U.S. mobile...

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“Earlier you had waxed nostalgic for the days when people sent you bad graphs . . .”

January 2, 2016
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“Earlier you had waxed nostalgic for the days when people sent you bad graphs . . .”

Nadia Hassan writes: Earlier you had waxed nostalgic for the days when people sent you bad graphs. This [from Javier Zarracina] is not a stand-out on that front, but it is far from ideal: A lot of buzz in recent years about data journalism or quantitative journalism. There is a lot of issues to be […] The post “Earlier you had waxed nostalgic for the days when people sent you…

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Vitamin pill shocker: “A complex web of vested interests promote calcium and vitamin D for osteoporosis, despite lack of evidence”

January 1, 2016
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Paul Alper points us to this scary news article by Susan Perry: Calcium and vitamin D supplements have been shown repeatedly to have no beneficial effect on preventing or treating osteoporosis . . . In fact, the evidence has not only demonstrated that calcium and vitamin D supplements do not reduce the risk of bone […] The post Vitamin pill shocker: “A complex web of vested interests promote calcium and…

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