Posts Tagged ‘ economics ’

“The following needs to be an immutable law of journalism: when someone with no track record comes into a field claiming to be able to do a job many times better for a fraction of the cost, the burden of proof needs to shift quickly and decisively onto the one making the claim. The reporter simply has to assume the claim is false until substantial evidence is presented to the contrary.”

January 17, 2018
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Mark Palko writes: The following needs to be an immutable law of journalism: when someone with no track record comes into a field claiming to be able to do a job many times better for a fraction of the cost, the burden of proof needs to shift quickly and decisively onto the one making the […] The post “The following needs to be an immutable law of journalism: when someone…

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A chart Hans Rosling would have loved

January 17, 2018
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A chart Hans Rosling would have loved

Kaiser Fung, of Junk Charts and Principal Analytics Prep, finds much to admire about this chart showing tremendous progress in social wellbeing across the globe over the last few decades.

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A look at how the New York Times readers look at the others

January 16, 2018
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A look at how the New York Times readers look at the others

Kaiser Fung, creator of Junk Charts and Principal Analytics Prep, discusses a popular chart by the New York Times on the impact of the Trump tax bill on middle-class households.

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Incentive to cheat

January 10, 2018
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Joseph Delaney quotes Matthew Yglesias writing this: But it is entirely emblematic of America’s post-Reagan treatment of business regulation. What a wealthy and powerful person faced with a legal impediment to moneymaking is supposed to do is work with a lawyer to devise clever means of subverting the purpose of the law. If you end […] The post Incentive to cheat appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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Benefits and limitations of randomized controlled trials: I agree with Deaton and Cartwright

January 8, 2018
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My discussion of “Understanding and misunderstanding randomized controlled trials,” by Angus Deaton and Nancy Cartwright, for Social Science & Medicine: I agree with Deaton and Cartwright that randomized trials are often overrated. There is a strange form of reasoning we often see in science, which is the idea that a chain of reasoning is as […] The post Benefits and limitations of randomized controlled trials: I agree with Deaton and…

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Nudge nudge, say no more

January 8, 2018
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Alan Finlayson puts it well when he writes of “the tiresome business of informing and persuading people replaced by psychological techniques designed to ‘nudge’ us in the right direction.” I think that’s about right. Nudging makes sense as part of a package that already includes information and persuasion. For example, tell us that smoking causes […] The post Nudge nudge, say no more appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Your (Canadian) tax dollars at work

December 31, 2017
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Retraction Watch links to this amazing (in a bad way) article by “The International Consortium of Investigators for Fairness in Trial Data Sharing” who propose that “study investigators be allowed exclusive use of the data for a minimum of 2 years after publication of the primary trial results and an additional 6 months for every […] The post Your (Canadian) tax dollars at work appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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The problem of media concentration/deregulation “is usually treated as a series of unrelated problems, much like a cocaine addict who complains about his drug problem, bankruptcy, divorce, and encounters with loan sharks, but who never makes a causal connection between the items on the list”

December 20, 2017
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Palko writes: There’s a huge problem that people aren’t talking about nearly enough. . . . Think about all of the recent news stories that are about or are a result of concentration/deregulation of media power and the inevitable consequences. Obviously, net neutrality falls under this category. So does the role that Facebook, and, to […] The post The problem of media concentration/deregulation “is usually treated as a series of…

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Yes, Virginia, it can be rational to vote!

December 19, 2017
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Carl Shulman correctly thought I’d be interested in this news item, “A single vote leads to a rare tie for control of the Virginia legislature”: A Republican seat flipped Democratic in a wild recount Tuesday – with the Democrat winning by a single vote – creating a rare 50-50 tie between the parties in the […] The post Yes, Virginia, it can be rational to vote! appeared first on Statistical…

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Ready Money

December 16, 2017
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Richard Reeves writes: Most of the people on the highest rung [which he elsewhere defines as the highest fifth of the income distribution] in America are in denial about their privilege. The American myth of meritocracy allows them to attribute their position to their brilliance and diligence, rather than to luck or a rigged system. […] The post Ready Money appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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