Posts Tagged ‘ economics ’

Drug-funded profs push drugs

April 22, 2017
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Someone who wishes to remain anonymous writes: I just read a long ProPublica article that I think your blog commenters might be interested in. It’s from February, but was linked to by the Mad Biologist today (https://mikethemadbiologist.com/). Here is a link to the article: https://www.propublica.org/article/big-pharma-quietly-enlists-leading-professors-to-justify-1000-per-day-drugs In short, it’s about a group of professors (mainly economists) […] The post Drug-funded profs push drugs appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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Journals for insignificant results

April 21, 2017
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Tom Daula writes: I know you’re not a fan of hypothesis testing, but the journals in this blog post are an interesting approach to the file drawer problem. I’ve never heard of them or their like. An alternative take (given academia standard practice) is “Journal for XYZ Discipline papers that p-hacking and forking paths could […] The post Journals for insignificant results appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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Reputational incentives and post-publication review: two (partial) solutions to the misinformation problem

April 18, 2017
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So. There are erroneous analyses published in scientific journals and in the news. Here I’m not talking not about outright propaganda, but about mistakes that happen to coincide with the preconceptions of their authors. We’ve seen lots of examples. Here are just a few: – Political scientist Larry Bartels is committed to a model of […] The post Reputational incentives and post-publication review: two (partial) solutions to the misinformation problem…

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Confuse, confuses, confused, confusing

April 13, 2017
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Confuse, confuses, confused, confusing

Via Twitter, @Stoltzmaniac sent me this chart, from the Economist (link to article): There is simply too much going on on the right side of the chart. The designer seems not to be able to decide which metric is more...

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Gilovich doubles down on hot hand denial

April 2, 2017
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Gilovich doubles down on hot hand denial

A correspondent pointed me to this Freaknomics radio interview with Thomas Gilovich, one of the authors of that famous “hot hand” paper from 1985, “Misperception of Chance Processes in Basketball.” Here’s the key bit from the Freakonomics interview: DUBNER: Right. The “hot-hand notion” or maybe the “hot-hand fallacy.” GILOVICH: Well, everyone who’s ever played the […] The post Gilovich doubles down on hot hand denial appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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Light entertainment: Colorful circle of life

March 28, 2017
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Light entertainment: Colorful circle of life

World Economic Forum can do better than this...

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Let’s accept the idea that treatment effects vary—not as something special but just as a matter of course

March 25, 2017
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Let’s accept the idea that treatment effects vary—not as something special but just as a matter of course

Tyler Cowen writes: Does knowing the price lower your enjoyment of goods and services? I [Cowen] don’t quite agree with this as stated, as the experience of enjoying a bargain can make it more pleasurable, or at least I have seen this for many people. Some in fact enjoy the bargain only, not the actual […] The post Let’s accept the idea that treatment effects vary—not as something special but…

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Making the world a richer place #onelesspie #PiDay

March 14, 2017
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Making the world a richer place #onelesspie #PiDay

Xan Gregg and I have been at it for a number of years. To celebrate Pi Day today, I am ridding the world of one pie chart. Here is a pie chart that is found on Wikipedia: Here is the...

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Hey, we’re hiring a postdoc! To work on survey weighting! And imputation!

March 14, 2017
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Here’s the ad: The Center on Poverty and Social Policy at the Columbia University School of Social Work and the Columbia Population Research Center are seeking a postdoctoral scholar with a PhD in economics, statistics, public policy, demography, social work, sociology, or a related discipline, to lead the development of survey weights and missing data imputations for the New York City […] The post Hey, we’re hiring a postdoc! To work on survey weighting! And imputation!…

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2 questions about HUD eligibility rules for federal housing programs

March 10, 2017
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Daniel McCracken writes: At work, I came across a potentially serious flaw in how HUD uses statistics to determine eligibility for federal housing programs (and the amount of subsidy each household receives). It seemed like something you might be interested in or blog about, so I figured I’d pass it along. For background, here’s the […] The post 2 questions about HUD eligibility rules for federal housing programs appeared first…

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