Posts Tagged ‘ Literature ’

What’s the worst joke you’ve ever heard?

May 27, 2015
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When I say worst, I mean worst. A joke with no redeeming qualities. Here’s my contender, from the book “1000 Knock-Knock Jokes for Kids”: – Knock Knock. – Who’s there? – Ann – Ann who? – An apple fell on my head. There’s something beautiful about this one. It’s the clerihew of jokes. Zero cleverness. […] The post What’s the worst joke you’ve ever heard? appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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Objects of the class “Foghorn Leghorn”

May 20, 2015
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Objects of the class “Foghorn Leghorn”

Reprinting a classic from 2010: The other day I saw some kids trying to tell knock-knock jokes, The only one they really knew was the one that goes: Knock knock. Who’s there? Banana? Banana who? Knock knock. Who’s there? Banana? Banana who? Knock knock. Who’s there? Orange. Orange who? Orange you glad I didn’t say […] The post Objects of the class “Foghorn Leghorn” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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Bob Carpenter’s favorite books on GUI design and programming

May 18, 2015
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Bob writes: I would highly recommend two books that changed the way I thought about GUI design (though I’ve read a lot of them): * Jeff Johnson. GUI Bloopers. I read the first edition in book form and the second in draft form (the editor contacted me based on my enthusiastic Amazon feedback, which was […] The post Bob Carpenter’s favorite books on GUI design and programming appeared first on…

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Apology to George A. Romero

May 16, 2015
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This came in the email one day last year: Good Afternoon Mr. Gelman, I am reaching out to you on behalf of Pearson Education who would like to license an excerpt of text from How Many Zombies Do You Know? for the following, upcoming textbook program: Title: Writing Today Author: Richard Johnson-Sheehan and Charles Paine […] The post Apology to George A. Romero appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Eccentric mathematician

April 27, 2015
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I just read this charming article by Lee Wilkinson’s brother on a mathematician named Yitang Zhang. Zhang recently gained some fame after recently proving a difficult theorem, and he seems to be a quite unusual, but likable, guy. What I liked about Wilkinson’s article is how it captured Zhang’s eccentricities with affection but without condescension. […] The post Eccentric mathematician appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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Statistical significance, practical significance, and interactions

April 24, 2015
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Statistical significance, practical significance, and interactions

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: interaction is one of the key underrated topics in statistics. I thought about this today (OK, a couple months ago, what with our delay) when reading a post by Dan Kopf on the exaggeration of small truths. Or, to put it another way, statistically significant but […] The post Statistical significance, practical significance, and interactions appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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These are the statistics papers you just have to read

March 4, 2015
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Here. And here. Just kidding. Here’s the real story. Susanna Makela writes: A few of us want to start a journal club for the statistics PhD students. The idea is to read important papers that we might not otherwise read, maybe because they’re not directly related to our area of research/we don’t have time/etc. What […] The post These are the statistics papers you just have to read appeared first…

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In search of the elusive loop of plagiarism

February 10, 2015
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In search of the elusive loop of plagiarism

OK, here’s a research project for you. From this recent blog comment, I learned about Mustapha Marrouchi, a professor of literature who has plagiarized from various writers, including the noted academic entertainer Slavoj Zizek. Amusing, given that Zizek himself has been caught plagiarizing. Zizek copied from Stanley Hornbeck. Did Hornbeck plagiarize from anyone else? Probably […] The post In search of the elusive loop of plagiarism appeared first on Statistical…

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Discussion with Steven Pinker connecting cognitive psychology research to the difficulties of writing

February 9, 2015
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Following up on my discussion of Steven Pinker’s writing advice, Pinker and I had an email exchange that cleared up some issues and raised some new ones. In particular, Pinker made a connection between the difficulty of writing and some research findings in cognitive psychology. I think this connection is really cool—I’ve been thinking and […] The post Discussion with Steven Pinker connecting cognitive psychology research to the difficulties of…

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Sorry, but I’m with Richard Ford on this one

February 8, 2015
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I just read the new Colson Whitehead book, the one where he plays poker? I like it at first, he had some great bits, but then it got boring. And, really, is there any gimmick less appealing, at this point, than “author/journalist goes and tries his luck at the World Series of Poker”? I don’t […] The post Sorry, but I’m with Richard Ford on this one appeared first on…

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