Posts Tagged ‘ Literature ’

When do stories work, Process tracing, and Connections between qualitative and quantitative research

January 11, 2017
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When do stories work, Process tracing, and Connections between qualitative and quantitative research

Jonathan Stray writes: I read your “when do stories work” paper (with Thomas Basbøll) with interest—as a journalist stories are of course central to my field. I wondered if you had encountered the “process tracing” literature in political science? It attempts to make sense of stories as “case studies” and there’s a nice logic of […] The post When do stories work, Process tracing, and Connections between qualitative and quantitative…

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Comment of the year

January 1, 2017
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In our discussion of research on the possible health benefits of a low-oxygen environment, Raghu wrote: This whole idea (low oxygen -> lower cancer risk) seems like a very straightforward thing to test in animals, which one can move to high and low oxygen environments . . . And then Llewelyn came in for the […] The post Comment of the year appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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Objects of the class “George Orwell”

December 27, 2016
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Objects of the class “George Orwell”

George Orwell is an exemplar in so many ways: a famed truth-teller who made things up, a left-winger who mocked left-wingers, an author of a much-misunderstood novel (see “Objects of the class ‘Sherlock Holmes,’”) probably a few dozen more. But here I’m talking about Orwell’s name being used as an adjective. More specifically, “Orwellian” being […] The post Objects of the class “George Orwell” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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Christmas special: Survey research, network sampling, and Charles Dickens’ coincidences

December 25, 2016
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Christmas special:  Survey research, network sampling, and Charles Dickens’ coincidences

It’s Christmas so what better time to write about Charles Dickens . . . Here’s the story: In traditional survey research we have been spoiled. If you work with atomistic data structures, a small sample looks like a little bit of the population. But a small sample of a network doesn’t look like the whole. […] The post Christmas special: Survey research, network sampling, and Charles Dickens’ coincidences appeared first…

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Unfinished (so far) draft blog posts

November 20, 2016
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Unfinished (so far) draft blog posts

Most of the time when I start writing a blog post, I continue till its finished. As of this writing this blog has 7128 posts published, 137 scheduled, and only 434 unpublished drafts sitting in the folder. 434 might sound like a lot, but we’ve been blogging for over 10 years, and a bunch of […] The post Unfinished (so far) draft blog posts appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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Spin

October 24, 2016
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Yesterday all the past. The language of effect size Spreading to Psychology along the sub-fields; the diffusion Of the counting-frame and the quincunx; Yesterday the shadow-reckoning in the ivy climates. Yesterday the assessment of hypotheses by tests, The divination of water; yesterday the invention Of cartwheels and clocks, the power-pose of Horses. Yesterday the bustling […] The post Spin appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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Some people are so easy to contact and some people aren’t.

October 16, 2016
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Some people are so easy to contact and some people aren’t.

I was reading Cowboys Full, James McManus’s entertaining history of poker (but way too much on the so-called World Series of Poker), and I skimmed the index to look up some of my favorite poker writers. Frank Wallace and David Spanier were both there but only got brief mentions in the text, I was disappointed […] The post Some people are so easy to contact and some people aren’t. appeared…

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“The Prose Factory: Literary Life in England Since 1918” and “The Windsor Faction”

October 7, 2016
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It’s been D. J. Taylor week here. I expect that something like 0% of you (rounding to the nearest percentage point) have heard of D. J. Taylor, and that’s ok. He’s an English literary critic. Several years ago I picked up a copy of his book, A Vain Conceit: British Fiction in the 1980s, and […] The post “The Prose Factory: Literary Life in England Since 1918” and “The Windsor…

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Genius is not enough: The sad story of Peter Hagelstein, living monument to the sunk-cost fallacy

September 11, 2016
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Genius is not enough:  The sad story of Peter Hagelstein, living monument to the sunk-cost fallacy

I sometimes pick up various old collections that will be suitable for bathroom reading, and so it was that the other day I was sitting on the throne reading the summer 1985 issue of Granta, entitled Science. Lots of great stuff here, including Oliver Sacks on Tourette’s syndrome, Thomas McMahan on Alexander Graham Bell, and […] The post Genius is not enough: The sad story of Peter Hagelstein, living monument…

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The new quantitative journalism

September 7, 2016
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The first of the breed was Bill James. But now we have a bunch: Felix Salmon, Nate Silver, Amanda Cox, Carl Bialik, . . . . I put them in a different category than traditional science journalists such as Malcolm Gladwell, Gina Kolata, Stephen Dubner who are invested in the “scientist as hero” story, or […] The post The new quantitative journalism appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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