Posts Tagged ‘ Literature ’

Stranger than fiction

December 17, 2017
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Someone pointed me to a long discussion, which he preferred not to share publicly, of his perspective on a scientific controversy in his field of research. He characterized a particular claim as “impossible to be true, i.e., false, and therefore, by definition, fiction.” But my impression of a lot of research misconduct is that the […] The post Stranger than fiction appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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“There was this prevalent, incestuous, backslapping research culture. The idea that their work should be criticized at all was anathema to them. Let alone that some punk should do it.”

December 6, 2017
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[image of a cat reading a comic book] How did the outsiders upend social psychology? CATRON: We used basic reporting techniques. We’d call up somebody and ask them about thus-and-so, and they’d mention so-and-so, so we’d call so-and-so, and ask about thus-and-so. I’d say, “OK, you’re saying this but the first guy said this other […] The post “There was this prevalent, incestuous, backslapping research culture. The idea that their…

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The four missing books of Lawrence Otis Graham

December 5, 2017
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We keep some books in the bathroom that are good for reading in small bits. The other day I was flipping through The Best American Essays 1993 and came across the following passage that had originally appeared in New York Magazine: I’m a thirty-year-old corporate lawyer at a midtown Manhattan firm, and I make $105,000 […] The post The four missing books of Lawrence Otis Graham appeared first on Statistical…

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When people proudly take ridiculous positions

November 8, 2017
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Tom Wolfe on evolution: I think it’s misleading to say that human beings evolved from animals. I mean, actually, nobody knows whether they did or not. This is just sad. Does Wolfe really think this? My guess is he’s trying to do a solid for his political allies. Jerry Coyne writes: Somewhere on his mission […] The post When people proudly take ridiculous positions appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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Planet of the hominids? We wanna see this exposition.

November 6, 2017
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It would be interesting if someone were to make an exhibit for a museum showing the timeline of humans and hominids, and under that showing children’s toys and literature, showing how these guys were represented in popular media. It probably already exists, right? P.S. I feel kinda bad that this bumped Dan’s more important, statistically-related […] The post Planet of the hominids? We wanna see this exposition. appeared first on…

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Maybe this paper is a parody, maybe it’s a semibluff

September 18, 2017
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Peter DeScioli writes: I was wondering if you saw this paper about people reading Harry Potter and then disliking Trump, attached. It seems to fit the shark attack genre. In this case, the issue seems to be judging causation from multiple regression with observational data, assuming that control variables are enough to narrow down to […] The post Maybe this paper is a parody, maybe it’s a semibluff appeared first…

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“From that perspective, power pose lies outside science entirely, and to criticize power pose would be a sort of category error, like criticizing The Lord of the Rings on the grounds that there’s no such thing as an invisibility ring, or criticizing The Rotter’s Club on the grounds that Jonathan Coe was just making it all up.”

August 26, 2017
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“From that perspective, power pose lies outside science entirely, and to criticize power pose would be a sort of category error, like criticizing The Lord of the Rings on the grounds that there’s no such thing as an invisibility ring, or criticizing The Rotter’s Club on the grounds that Jonathan Coe was just making it all up.”

From last year: One could make the argument that power pose is innocuous, maybe beneficial in that it is a way of encouraging people to take charge of their lives. And this may be so. Even if power pose itself is meaningless, the larger “power pose” story could be a plus. Of course, if power […] The post “From that perspective, power pose lies outside science entirely, and to criticize…

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It is somewhat paradoxical that good stories tend to be anomalous, given that when it comes to statistical data, we generally want what is typical, not what is surprising. Our resolution of this paradox is . . .

August 18, 2017
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From a blog comment a few years ago regarding an article by Robert Kosara: As Thomas and I discuss in our paper [When Do Stories Work? Evidence and Illustration in the Social Sciences], it is somewhat paradoxical that good stories tend to be anomalous, given that when it comes to statistical data, we generally want […] The post It is somewhat paradoxical that good stories tend to be anomalous, given…

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The Westlake Review

August 14, 2017
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I came across this site one day: The Westlake Review is a blog dedicated to doing a detailed review and analysis of every novel Donald Westlake published under his own name, as well as under a variety of pseudonyms. These reviews will reveal major plot elements, though they will not be full synopses. People who […] The post The Westlake Review appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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Irwin Shaw, John Updike, and Donald Trump

August 8, 2017
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So. I read more by and about Irwin Shaw. I read Shaw’s end-of-career collection of short stories and his most successful novel, The Young Lions, and also the excellent biography by Michael Shnayerson. I also read Adam Begley’s recent biography of John Updike, which was also very good, and it made be sad that probably […] The post Irwin Shaw, John Updike, and Donald Trump appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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