Posts Tagged ‘ Literature ’

A quote from William James that could’ve come from Robert Benchley or S. J. Perelman or Dorothy Parker

June 4, 2017
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Following up on yesterday’s post, here’s a William James quote that could’ve been plucked right off the Algonquin Round Table: Is life worth living? It all depends on the liver. The post A quote from William James that could’ve ...

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A collection of quotes from William James that all could’ve come from . . . Bill James!

June 3, 2017
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From a few years ago, some quotes from the classic psychologist that fit within the worldview of the classic sabermetrician: Faith means belief in something concerning which doubt is theoretically possible. A chain is no stronger than its weakest link, and life is after all a chain. A great many people think they are thinking […] The post A collection of quotes from William James that all could’ve come from…

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Design top down, Code bottom up

May 22, 2017
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Top-down design means designing from the client application programmer interface (API) down to the code. The API lays out a precise functional specification, which says what the code will do, not how it will do it. Coding bottom up means coding the lowest-level foundations first, testing them, then continuing to build. Sometimes this requires dropping […] The post Design top down, Code bottom up appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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Reality meets the DeLilloverse

May 11, 2017
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From 2009: “They thought ASU’s brand was too strong to compete with. Incarnate Word is now part of the Communiversity @ Surprise, a newly opened one-stop learning center for higher education in the northwest Valley.” I guess my statistics textbooks probably read like parodies of statistics textbooks, so from that perspective it makes sense that […] The post Reality meets the DeLilloverse appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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Journals for insignificant results

April 21, 2017
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Tom Daula writes: I know you’re not a fan of hypothesis testing, but the journals in this blog post are an interesting approach to the file drawer problem. I’ve never heard of them or their like. An alternative take (given academia standard practice) is “Journal for XYZ Discipline papers that p-hacking and forking paths could […] The post Journals for insignificant results appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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Storytelling as predictive model checking

February 10, 2017
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Storytelling as predictive model checking

I finally got around to reading Adam Begley’s biography of John Updike, and it was excellent. I’ll have more on that in a future post, but for now I just went to share the point, which I’d not known before, that almost all of Updike’s characters and even the descriptions and events in many of […] The post Storytelling as predictive model checking appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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I’m thinking of using these at the titles for my next 97 blog posts

February 2, 2017
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I’m thinking of using these at the titles for my next 97 blog posts

Where do you think these actually came from? (No googling—that would be cheating.) P.S. Anyone who wants to know the answer can google it. But there were some great guesses in the comments. My favorite, from Frank: I’ve got to go with “before the colon” in questionable social science papers, e.g: “Don’t make me laugh: […] The post I’m thinking of using these at the titles for my next 97…

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When do stories work, Process tracing, and Connections between qualitative and quantitative research

January 11, 2017
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When do stories work, Process tracing, and Connections between qualitative and quantitative research

Jonathan Stray writes: I read your “when do stories work” paper (with Thomas Basbøll) with interest—as a journalist stories are of course central to my field. I wondered if you had encountered the “process tracing” literature in political science? It attempts to make sense of stories as “case studies” and there’s a nice logic of […] The post When do stories work, Process tracing, and Connections between qualitative and quantitative…

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Comment of the year

January 1, 2017
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In our discussion of research on the possible health benefits of a low-oxygen environment, Raghu wrote: This whole idea (low oxygen -> lower cancer risk) seems like a very straightforward thing to test in animals, which one can move to high and low oxygen environments . . . And then Llewelyn came in for the […] The post Comment of the year appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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Objects of the class “George Orwell”

December 27, 2016
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Objects of the class “George Orwell”

George Orwell is an exemplar in so many ways: a famed truth-teller who made things up, a left-winger who mocked left-wingers, an author of a much-misunderstood novel (see “Objects of the class ‘Sherlock Holmes,’”) probably a few dozen more. But here I’m talking about Orwell’s name being used as an adjective. More specifically, “Orwellian” being […] The post Objects of the class “George Orwell” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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