Posts Tagged ‘ Uncategorized ’

Visualizing the causes of airline crashes

March 30, 2015
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Visualizing the causes of airline crashes

There has been a spate of recent high-profile airline crashes (Malaysia Airlines, TransAsia Airways, Germanwings,...) so I was surprised when I saw a time series plot of the number of airline crashes by year, which indicates that the annual number of airline crashes has been decreasing since 1993. The data […] The post Visualizing the causes of airline crashes appeared first on The DO Loop.

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Teaser trailer for the Genomic Data Science Specialization on Coursera

March 26, 2015
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  We have been hard at work in the studio putting together our next specialization to launch on Coursera. It will be called the "Genomic Data Science Specialization" and includes a spectacular line up of instructors: Steven Salzberg, Ela Pertea, James Taylor, Liliana Florea, Kasper Hansen, and me. The specialization will cover command line tools, statistics,

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On the number of permutations supported in SAS software

March 25, 2015
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On the number of permutations supported in SAS software

There's "big," and then there is "factorial big." If you have k items, the number of permutations is "k factorial," which is written as k!. The factorial function gets big fast. For example, the value of k! for several values of k is shown in the following table. You can […] The post On the number of permutations supported in SAS software appeared first on The DO Loop.

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What to cite?

March 25, 2015
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What to cite?

This question comes from a comment on another post: I’ve seen authors citing as many references as possible to try to please potential referees. Many of those references are low quality papers though. Any general guidance about a typical length for the reference section? It depends on the subject and style of the paper. I’ve […]

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Introduction to Bioconductor HarvardX MOOC starts this Monday March 30

March 24, 2015
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Bioconductor is one of the most widely used open source toolkits for biological high-throughput data. In this four week course, co-taught with Vince Carey and Mike Love, we will introduce you to Bioconductor's general infrastructure and then focus on two specific technologies: next generation sequencing and microarrays. The lectures and assessments will be annotated in

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New job opportunities at Monash

March 24, 2015
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New job opportunities at Monash

We are now advertising for various positions in applied statistics, operations research and applied mathematics. Click here for details These jobs are with MAXIMA (the Monash Academy for Cross & Interdisciplinary Mathematical Applications). Please do not send any questions to me (I won’t answer). Click above and fol­low the instructions.

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Vectors that have a fractional number of elements

March 23, 2015
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Vectors that have a fractional number of elements

The title of this article makes no sense. How can the number of elements (in fact, the number of anything!) not be a whole number? In fact, it can't. However, the title refers to the fact that you might compute a quantity that ought to be an integer, but is […] The post Vectors that have a fractional number of elements appeared first on The DO Loop.

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Two new interviews

March 20, 2015
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Two new interviews

I was recently interviewed as part of a promotion for the Monash Business School. The interviews can be watched below if anyone is interested. The titles chosen weren’t my ideas. Predicting the future: pushing the boundaries of electricity forecastin...

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A surprisingly tricky issue when using genomic signatures for personalized medicine

March 19, 2015
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A surprisingly tricky issue when using genomic signatures for personalized medicine

My student Prasad Patil has a really nice paper that just came out in Bioinformatics (preprint in case paywalled). The paper is about a surprisingly tricky normalization issue with genomic signatures. Genomic signatures are basically statistical/machine learning functions applied to the measurements for a set of genes to predict how long patients will survive, or how they

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A simple (and fair) way all statistics journals could drive up their impact factor.

March 18, 2015
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Hypothesis: If every method in every stats journal was implemented in a corresponding R package (easy), was required to have a  companion document that was a tutorial on how to use the software (easy), included a reference to how to cite the paper if you used the software (easy) and the paper/tutorial was posted to

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