Posts Tagged ‘ Uncategorized ’

Skew this

September 22, 2014
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Skew this

The skewness of a distribution indicates whether a distribution is symmetric or not. A distribution that is symmetric about its mean has zero skewness. In contrast, if the right tail of a unimodal distribution has more mass than the left tail, then the distribution is said to be "right skewed" […]

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FPP now available as a downloadable e-book

September 21, 2014
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FPP now available as a downloadable e-book

My forecasting textbook with George Athanasopoulos is already available online (for free), and in print via Amazon (for under $40). Now we have made it available as a downloadable e-book via Google Books (for $15.55). The Google Books version is identical to the print version on Amazon (apart from a few typos that have been fixed). To use […]

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The frequency of letters in an English corpus

September 19, 2014
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The frequency of letters in an English corpus

It's time for another blog post about ciphers. As I indicated in my previous blog post about substitution ciphers, the classical substitution cipher is no longer used to encrypt ultra-secret messages because the enciphered text is prone to a type of statistical attack known as frequency analysis. At the root […]

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Shamer shaming

September 18, 2014
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This post is by Phil Price. I can’t recall when I first saw “shaming” used in its currently popular sense. I remember noting “slut shaming” and “fat shaming” but did they first become popular two years ago? Three? At any rate, “shaming” is now everywhere…and evidently it’s a very bad thing. When I first saw […] The post Shamer shaming appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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Read from one data set and write to another with SAS/IML

September 17, 2014
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Read from one data set and write to another with SAS/IML

Many people know that the SAS/IML language enables you to read data from and write results to multiple SAS data sets. When you open a new data set, it is a good programming practice to close the previous data set. But did you know that you can have two data […]

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Applied Statisticians: people want to learn what we do. Let’s teach them.

September 15, 2014
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In this recent opinion piece, Hadley Wickham explains how data science goes beyond Statistics and that data science is not promoted in academia. He defines data science as follows: I think there are three main steps in a data science … Continue reading →

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Handling run-time errors in user-defined modules

September 15, 2014
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Handling run-time errors in user-defined modules

I received the following email from a SAS/IML programmer: I am getting an error in a PROC IML module that I wrote. The SAS Log says NOTE: Paused in module NAME When I submit other commands, PROC IML doesn't seem to understand them. How can I continue the program? The […]

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An exploratory technique for visualizing the distributions of 100 variables

September 10, 2014
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An exploratory technique for visualizing the distributions of 100 variables

In a previous blog post I showed how to order a set of variables by a statistic. After reshaping data, you can create a graph that contains box plots for many variables. Ordering the variables by some statistic (mean, median, variance,...) helps to differentiate and distinguish the variables. You can […]

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A non-comprehensive list of awesome female data people on Twitter

September 9, 2014
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I was just talking to a student who mentioned she didn't know Jenny Bryan was on Twitter. She is and she is an awesome person to follow. I also realized that I hadn't seen a good list of women on Twitter … Continue reading →

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Tim Harford on forecasting

September 8, 2014
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Tim Harford on forecasting

A few weeks ago I had a Skype chat with Tim Harford, the “Undercover Economist” for Britain’s Financial Times. He was working on an article for the FT on forecasting, and wanted my perspective as an academic forecaster. I mostly talked about what makes some things more predictable than others, as discussed in this blog […]

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