Posts Tagged ‘ science ’

Gelman digested read

August 16, 2017
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It's hard to keep up with Andrew Gelman, so let me point to some interesting recent posts from his blog. Readings on philosophy of statistics (link): Andrew has a bunch of links of (mostly his own) writings about deep statistical issues. Science is about understanding how the world works, which involves questions of cause and effect, and randomness and unexplained variability. Data that can be observed are almost never sufficient…

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If you are using Facebook Ads split testing (A/B testing), stop fooling yourself

July 26, 2017
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Kaiser Fung, founder of Principal Analytics Prep, and former director of Applied Analytics at Columbia University, explains why you can't run proper A/B tests on Facebook

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Crash course in precision and uncertainty, in advance of that climate debate, free for Mr. Pruitt

July 13, 2017
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Scott Pruitt, the EPA chief, continues to make innumerate comments about his personal views on climate change science. His chief accusation - chanted often - is that we need more "precision". In his view, achieving 100% precision is necessary because it removes all uncertainty, allowing lawmakers to take action. This post is inspired by his latest interview in which he is encouraging a TV debate event to air out the…

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Why are there so many open positions in analytics?

June 28, 2017
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Why are there so many open positions in analytics?

Last week, I gave an information session on the next-gen data analytics bootcamp called Principal Analytics Prep that we just launched. A recap of the session is available here as a podcast. To prepare for the session, I did a job search on Linkedin, and found over 80,000 open positions in the U.S. matching the word "analytics". Of these, about 3,500 positions are junior or entry-level positions in the greater…

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How to read survey results: chocolate milk edition

June 19, 2017
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Apparently, the Washington Post decided to assist the dairy industry in its latest advertising campaign by publishing a weird survey result, which claims that some adults believe that chocolate milk comes from brown cows. (link) Just start by thinking about the survey design. In order for people to express this opinion, the survey had to contain a choice of "brown cows." If they had done an open-ended survey, the result…

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Book review: Everybody Lies by Seth Stephens-Davidowitz

May 15, 2017
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Book review: Everybody Lies by Seth Stephens-Davidowitz

Kaiser Fung, founder of Principal Analytics Prep, discusses Seth Stephens-Davidowitz's new book, Everybody Lies

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A pretty good chart ruined by some naive analysis

May 10, 2017
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A pretty good chart ruined by some naive analysis

The following chart showing wage gaps by gender among U.S. physicians was sent to me via Twitter: The original chart was published by the Stat News website (link). I am most curious about the source of the data. It apparently...

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Pints, water, fishes, pond

May 2, 2017
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Pints, water, fishes, pond

@apollo_0 on twitter asks me to comment on this, by Scientific Britain: Here's my comment:

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Dispute over analysis of school quality and home prices shows social science is hard

April 24, 2017
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Dispute over analysis of school quality and home prices shows social science is hard

Most of my friends with families fret over school quality when deciding where to buy their homes. It's well known that good school districts are also associated with expensive houses. A feedback cycle is at work here: home prices surge where there are good schools; only richer people can afford to buy such homes; wealth brings other advantages, and so the schools tend to have better students, which leads to…

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My pre-existing United boycott, and some musing on randomness and fairness

April 12, 2017
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You probably already saw the video - if not, do yourself a favor, and search for "man forcibly removed from overbooked United flight." Other than the video evidence, which is damning, we don't have many facts, other than assertions made by various parties, repeated endlessly on social media and mainline media. Some facts, such as the United CEO claiming the passenger was "belligerent," is an assault on the meaning of…

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