Posts Tagged ‘ Miscellaneous Statistics ’

Vine regression?

February 17, 2017
By

Jeremy Neufeld writes: I’m an undergraduate student at the University of Maryland and I was recently referred to this paper (Vine Regression, by Roger Cooke, Harry Joe, and Bo Chang), also an accompanying summary blog post by the main author) as potentially useful in policy analysis. With the big claims it makes, I am not […] The post Vine regression? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

Read more »

Measurement error and the replication crisis

February 11, 2017
By
Measurement error and the replication crisis

Alison McCook from Retraction Watch interviewed Eric Loken and me regarding our recent article, “Measurement error and the replication crisis.” We talked about why traditional statistics are often counterproductive to research in the human sciences. Here’s the interview: Retraction Watch: Your article focuses on the “noise” that’s present in research studies. What is “noise” and […] The post Measurement error and the replication crisis appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

Read more »

Theoretical statistics is the theory of applied statistics: how to think about what we do (My talk at the University of Michigan this Friday 3pm)

February 7, 2017
By
Theoretical statistics is the theory of applied statistics: how to think about what we do (My talk at the University of Michigan this Friday 3pm)

Theoretical statistics is the theory of applied statistics: how to think about what we do Andrew Gelman, Department of Statistics and Department of Political Science, Columbia University Working scientists and engineers commonly feel that philosophy is a waste of time. But theoretical and philosophical principles can guide practice, so it makes sense for us to […] The post Theoretical statistics is the theory of applied statistics: how to think about…

Read more »

The “What does not kill my statistical significance makes it stronger” fallacy

February 6, 2017
By
The “What does not kill my statistical significance makes it stronger” fallacy

As anyone who’s designed a study and gathered data can tell you, getting statistical significance is difficult. Lots of our best ideas don’t pan out, and even if a hypothesis seems to be supported by the data, the magic “p less than .05” can be elusive. And we also know that noisy data and small […] The post The “What does not kill my statistical significance makes it stronger” fallacy…

Read more »

Long Shot

February 5, 2017
By

Frank Harrell doesn’t like p-values: In my [Frank’s] opinion, null hypothesis testing and p-values have done significant harm to science. The purpose of this note is to catalog the many problems caused by p-values. As readers post new problems in their comments, more will be incorporated into the list, so this is a work in […] The post Long Shot appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

Read more »

No guru, no method, no teacher, Just you and I and nature . . . in the garden. Of forking paths.

January 30, 2017
By
No guru, no method, no teacher, Just you and I and nature . . . in the garden.  Of forking paths.

Here’s a quote: Instead of focusing on theory, the focus is on asking and answering practical research questions. It sounds eminently reasonable, yet in context I think it’s completely wrong. I will explain. But first some background. Junk science and statistics They say that hard cases make bad law. But bad research can make good […] The post No guru, no method, no teacher, Just you and I and nature…

Read more »

How to attack human rights and the U.S. economy at the same time

January 28, 2017
By

I received this email from a postdoc in a technical field: As you might have heard, Trump signed an executive order today issuing a 30-day total suspension of visas and other immigration benefits for the citizens of Iran and six other countries. For my wife and me, this means that our visas are suspended; we […] The post How to attack human rights and the U.S. economy at the same…

Read more »

Absence of evidence is evidence of alcohol?

January 27, 2017
By

Arho Toikka writes: I ran across what I feel is a pretty peculiar use of statistical significance and p-values, and thought I’d send you a message and see if you find it interesting too or if I’m just confused about something: I read a news story about a study that showed that previous studies on […] The post Absence of evidence is evidence of alcohol? appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

Read more »

“Statistical heartburn: An attempt to digest four pizza publications from the Cornell Food and Brand Lab”

January 25, 2017
By
“Statistical heartburn: An attempt to digest four pizza publications from the Cornell Food and Brand Lab”

Tim van der Zee​, Jordan Anaya​, and Nicholas Brown posted this very detailed criticism of four papers published by food researcher and business school professor Brian Wansink. The papers are all in obscure journals and became notorious only after Wansink blogged about them in the context of some advice he was giving to graduate students. […] The post “Statistical heartburn: An attempt to digest four pizza publications from the Cornell…

Read more »

Quick statistical comment

January 25, 2017
By

A reporter pointed me to an article to be published in a scientific journal and asked if I thought the statistics were OK. I took a quick look and replied: I did not look at the paper in detail but it seemed reasonable to me. The only part of it that I would not take […] The post Quick statistical comment appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

Read more »


Subscribe

Email:

  Subscribe