Posts Tagged ‘ Miscellaneous Statistics ’

Multicollinearity causing risk and uncertainty

September 22, 2016
By

Alexia Gaudeul writes: Maybe you will find this interesting / amusing / frightening, but the Journal of Risk and Uncertainty recently published a paper with a rather obvious multicollinearity problem. The issue does not come up that often in the published literature, so I thought you might find it interesting for your blog. The paper […] The post Multicollinearity causing risk and uncertainty appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

Read more »

Hey, PPNAS . . . this one is the fish that got away.

September 18, 2016
By
Hey, PPNAS . . . this one is the fish that got away.

Uri Simonsohn just turned down the chance to publish a paper that could’ve been published in a top journal (a couple years ago I’d’ve said Psychological Science but recently they’ve somewhat cleaned up their act, so let’s say PPNAS which seems to be still going strong) followed by features in NPR, major newspapers, BoingBoing, and […] The post Hey, PPNAS . . . this one is the fish that got…

Read more »

Pro Publica Surgeon Scorecard Update

September 17, 2016
By

Adan Becerra writes: In light of your previous discussions on the ProPublica surgeon scorecard, I was hoping to hear your thoughts about this article recently published in Annals of Surgery titled, “Evaluation of the ProPublica Surgeon Scorecard ‘Adjusted Complication Rate’ Measure Specifications.”​ The article is by K. Ban, M. Cohen, C. Ko, M. Friedberg, J. […] The post Pro Publica Surgeon Scorecard Update appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

Read more »

Bayesian Statistics Then and Now

September 12, 2016
By

I happened to recently reread this article of mine from 2010, and I absolutely love it. I don’t think it’s been read by many people—it was published as one of three discussions of an article by Brad Efron in Statistical Science—so I wanted to share it with you again here. This is the article where […] The post Bayesian Statistics Then and Now appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

Read more »

Hypothesis Testing is a Bad Idea (my talk at Warwick, England, 2pm Thurs 15 Sept)

September 10, 2016
By

This is the conference, and here’s my talk (will do Google hangout, just as with my recent talks in Bern, Strasbourg, etc): Hypothesis Testing is a Bad Idea Through a series of examples, we consider problems with classical hypothesis testing, whether performed using classical p-values or confidence intervals, Bayes factors, or Bayesian inference using noninformative […] The post Hypothesis Testing is a Bad Idea (my talk at Warwick, England, 2pm…

Read more »

It’s not about normality, it’s all about reality

September 8, 2016
By
It’s not about normality, it’s all about reality

This is just a repost, with a snazzy and appropriate title, of our discussion from a few years ago on the assumptions of linear regression, from section 3.6 of my book with Jennifer. In decreasing order of importance, these assumptions are: 1. Validity. Most importantly, the data you are analyzing should map to the research […] The post It’s not about normality, it’s all about reality appeared first on Statistical…

Read more »

Publication bias occurs within as well as between projects

August 30, 2016
By

Kent Holsinger points to this post by Kevin Drum entitled, “Publication Bias Is Boring. You Should Care About It Anyway,” and writes: I am an evolutionary biologist, not a psychologist, but this article describes a disturbing Scenario concerning oxytocin research that seems plausible. It is also relevant to the reproducibility/publishing issues you have been discussing […] The post Publication bias occurs within as well as between projects appeared first on…

Read more »

Better to just not see the sausage get made

August 27, 2016
By
Better to just not see the sausage get made

Mike Carniello writes: This article in the NYT leads to the full text, in which these statement are buried (no pun intended): What is the probability that two given texts were written by the same author? This was achieved by posing an alternative null hypothesis H0 (“both texts were written by the same author”) and […] The post Better to just not see the sausage get made appeared first on…

Read more »

A day in the life

August 25, 2016
By

I like to post approx one item per day on this blog, so when multiple things come up in the same day, I worry about the sustainability of all this. I suppose I could up the posting rate to 2 a day but I think that could be too much of a burden on the […] The post A day in the life appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

Read more »

One more thing you don’t have to worry about

August 22, 2016
By

Baruch Eitam writes: So I have been convinced by the futility of NHT for my scientific goals and by the futility of of significance testing (in the sense of using p-values as a measure of the strength of evidence against the null). So convinced that I have been teaching this for the last 2 years. […] The post One more thing you don’t have to worry about appeared first on…

Read more »


Subscribe

Email:

  Subscribe