Posts Tagged ‘ Miscellaneous Statistics ’

Call for research on California water resources

July 28, 2016
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Patrick Atwater writes: I serve as a project manager of the California Data Collaborative, a coalition of water utilities working together to share data and ensure water reliability. We’ve put together a quick call for ideas on studies into the demand effects of water rates leveraging this unique database. California’s water world is highly fragmented […] The post Call for research on California water resources appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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More evidence that even top researchers routinely misinterpret p-values

July 26, 2016
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More evidence that even top researchers routinely misinterpret p-values

Blake McShane writes: I wanted to write to you about something related to your ongoing posts on replication in psychology as well as your recent post the ASA statement on p-values. In addition to the many problems you and others have documented with the p-value as a measure of evidence (both those computed “honestly” and […] The post More evidence that even top researchers routinely misinterpret p-values appeared first on…

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“Pointwise mutual information as test statistics”

July 17, 2016
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Christian Bartels writes: Most of us will probably agree that making good decisions under uncertainty based on limited data is highly important but remains challenging. We have decision theory that provides a framework to reduce risks of decisions under uncertainty with typical frequentist test statistics being examples for controlling errors in absence of prior knowledge. […] The post “Pointwise mutual information as test statistics” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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“Positive Results Are Better for Your Career”

July 5, 2016
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Brad Stiritz writes: I thought you might enjoy reading the following Der Spiegel interview with Peter Wilmshurst. Talk about fighting the good fight! He took the path of greatest resistance, and he beat what I presume are pretty stiff odds. Then the company representatives asked me to leave some of the patients out of the […] The post “Positive Results Are Better for Your Career” appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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Data science as the application of theoretical knowledge

July 3, 2016
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Patrick Atwater writes: Insights that “much of what’s hard looks easy” and it’s about “getting the damn data” highlight important points that much of the tech-ey industry dominating definitions overlook in the excitement about production ML recommendation systems and the like. Working to build from that grounded perspective, I penned together a quick piece digging […] The post Data science as the application of theoretical knowledge appeared first on Statistical…

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Hey—here’s a tip from the biology literature: If your correlation is .02, try binning your data to get a correlation of .8 or .9!

June 17, 2016
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Josh Cherry writes: This isn’t in the social sciences, but it’s an egregious example of statistical malpractice: Below the abstract you can find my [Cherry’s] comment on the problem, which was submitted as a letter to the journal, but rejected on the grounds that the issue does not affect the main conclusions of the article […] The post Hey—here’s a tip from the biology literature: If your correlation is .02,…

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Racial classification sociology controversy update

June 10, 2016
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The other day I posted on a controversy in sociology where Aliya Saperstein and Andrew Penner analyzed data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, coming to the conclusion that “that race is not a fixed characteristic of individuals but is flexible and continually negotiated in everyday interactions,” but then Lance Hannon and Robert DeFina […] The post Racial classification sociology controversy update appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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“What is a good, convincing example in which p-values are useful?”

June 9, 2016
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A correspondent writes: I came across this discussion of p-values, and I’d be very interested in your thoughts on it, especially on the evaluation in that thread of “two major arguments against the usefulness of the p-value:” 1. With large samples, significance tests pounce on tiny, unimportant departures from the null hypothesis. 2. Almost no […] The post “What is a good, convincing example in which p-values are useful?” appeared…

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Taking responsibility for your statistical conclusions: You must decide what variation to compare to.

June 4, 2016
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Taking responsibility for your statistical conclusions:  You must decide what variation to compare to.

A couple people pointed me to a recent paper by Josh Terrell, Andrew Kofink, Justin Middleton, Clarissa Rainear, Emerson Murphy-Hill​, and Chris Parnin, “Gender bias in open source: Pull request acceptance of women versus men.” The term “bias” seems a bit loaded given the descriptive nature of their study. That said, it’s good for people […] The post Taking responsibility for your statistical conclusions: You must decide what variation to…

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“The Natural Selection of Bad Science”

June 2, 2016
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That’s the title of a new paper by Paul Smaldino and Richard McElreath which presents a sort of agent-based model that reproduces the growth in the publication of junk science that we’ve seen in recent decades. Even before looking at this paper I was positively disposed toward it for two reasons. First because I do […] The post “The Natural Selection of Bad Science” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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