Posts Tagged ‘ Miscellaneous Statistics ’

Of rabbits and cannons

February 17, 2018
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When does it make sense to shoot a rabbit with a cannon? I was reminded of this question recently when I happened to come across this exchange in the comments section from a couple years ago, in the context of the finding patterns in the frequencies of births on different days: Rahul: Yes, inverting a […] The post Of rabbits and cannons appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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3 quick tricks to get into the data science/analytics field

February 12, 2018
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John McCool writes: Do you have advice getting into the data science/analytics field? I just graduated with a B.S. in environmental science and a statistics minor and am currently interning at a university. I enjoy working with datasets from sports to transportation and doing historical analysis and predictive modeling. My quick advice is to avoid […] The post 3 quick tricks to get into the data science/analytics field appeared first…

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What’s Wrong with “Evidence-Based Medicine” and How Can We Do Better? (My talk at the University of Michigan Friday 2pm)

February 8, 2018
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Tomorrow (Fri 9 Feb) 2pm at the NCRC Research Auditorium (Building 10) at the University of Michigan: What’s Wrong with “Evidence-Based Medicine” and How Can We Do Better? Andrew Gelman, Department of Statistics and Department of Political Science, Columbia University “Evidence-based medicine” sounds like a good idea, but it can run into problems when the […] The post What’s Wrong with “Evidence-Based Medicine” and How Can We Do Better? (My…

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354 possible control groups; what to do?

February 8, 2018
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Jonas Cederlöf writes: I’m a PhD student in economics at Stockholm University and a frequent reader of your blog. I have for a long time followed your quest in trying to bring attention to p-hacking and multiple comparison problems in research. I’m now myself faced with the aforementioned problem and want to at the very […] The post 354 possible control groups; what to do? appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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Methodological terrorism. For reals. (How to deal with “what we don’t know” in missing-data imputation.)

February 7, 2018
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Kevin Lewis points us to this paper, by Aaron Safer-Lichtenstein, Gary LaFree, Thomas Loughran, on the methodology of terrorism studies. This is about as close to actual “methodological terrorism” as we’re ever gonna see here. The linked article begins: Although the empirical and analytical study of terrorism has grown dramatically in the past decade and […] The post Methodological terrorism. For reals. (How to deal with “what we don’t know”…

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p=0.24: “Modest improvements” if you want to believe it, a null finding if you don’t.

February 5, 2018
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David Allison sends along this juxtaposition: Press Release: “A large-scale effort to reduce childhood obesity in two low-income Massachusetts communities resulted in some modest improvements among schoolchildren over a relatively short period of time…” Study: “Overall, we did not observe a significant decrease in the percent of students with obesity from baseline to post intervention […] The post p=0.24: “Modest improvements” if you want to believe it, a null finding…

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Snappy Titles: Deterministic claims increase the probability of getting a paper published in a psychology journal

February 4, 2018
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A junior psychology researcher who would like to remain anonymous writes: I wanted to pass along something I found to be of interest today as a proponent of pre-registration. Here is a recent article from Social Psychological and Personality Science. I was interested by the pre-registered study. Here is the pre-registration for Study 1. The […] The post Snappy Titles: Deterministic claims increase the probability of getting a paper published…

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Snappy Titles: Deterministic claims increase the probability of getting a paper published in a psychology journal

February 4, 2018
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A junior psychology researcher who would like to remain anonymous writes: I wanted to pass along something I found to be of interest today as a proponent of pre-registration. Here is a recent article from Social Psychological and Personality Science. I was interested by the pre-registered study. Here is the pre-registration for Study 1. The […] The post Snappy Titles: Deterministic claims increase the probability of getting a paper published…

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Geoff Norman: Is science a special kind of storytelling?

January 31, 2018
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Javier Benítez points to this article by epidemiologist Geoff Norman, who writes: The nature of science was summarized beautifully by a Stanford professor of science education, Mary Budd Rowe, who said that: Science is a special kind of story-telling with no right or wrong answers. Just better and better stories. Benítez writes that he doesn’t […] The post Geoff Norman: Is science a special kind of storytelling? appeared first on…

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My suggested project for the MIT Better Science Ideathon: assessing the reasonableness of missing-data imputations.

January 29, 2018
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Leo Celi writes: We are 3 months away from the MIT Better Science Ideathon on April 23. We would like to request your help with mentoring a team or 2 during the ideathon. During the ideathon, teams discuss a specific issue (lack of focus on reproducibility across majority of journals) or problem that arose from […] The post My suggested project for the MIT Better Science Ideathon: assessing the reasonableness…

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