Posts Tagged ‘ Miscellaneous Statistics ’

Hey—here’s a tip from the biology literature: If your correlation is .02, try binning your data to get a correlation of .8 or .9!

June 17, 2016
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Josh Cherry writes: This isn’t in the social sciences, but it’s an egregious example of statistical malpractice: Below the abstract you can find my [Cherry’s] comment on the problem, which was submitted as a letter to the journal, but rejected on the grounds that the issue does not affect the main conclusions of the article […] The post Hey—here’s a tip from the biology literature: If your correlation is .02,…

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Racial classification sociology controversy update

June 10, 2016
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The other day I posted on a controversy in sociology where Aliya Saperstein and Andrew Penner analyzed data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, coming to the conclusion that “that race is not a fixed characteristic of individuals but is flexible and continually negotiated in everyday interactions,” but then Lance Hannon and Robert DeFina […] The post Racial classification sociology controversy update appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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“What is a good, convincing example in which p-values are useful?”

June 9, 2016
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A correspondent writes: I came across this discussion of p-values, and I’d be very interested in your thoughts on it, especially on the evaluation in that thread of “two major arguments against the usefulness of the p-value:” 1. With large samples, significance tests pounce on tiny, unimportant departures from the null hypothesis. 2. Almost no […] The post “What is a good, convincing example in which p-values are useful?” appeared…

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Taking responsibility for your statistical conclusions: You must decide what variation to compare to.

June 4, 2016
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Taking responsibility for your statistical conclusions:  You must decide what variation to compare to.

A couple people pointed me to a recent paper by Josh Terrell, Andrew Kofink, Justin Middleton, Clarissa Rainear, Emerson Murphy-Hill​, and Chris Parnin, “Gender bias in open source: Pull request acceptance of women versus men.” The term “bias” seems a bit loaded given the descriptive nature of their study. That said, it’s good for people […] The post Taking responsibility for your statistical conclusions: You must decide what variation to…

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“The Natural Selection of Bad Science”

June 2, 2016
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That’s the title of a new paper by Paul Smaldino and Richard McElreath which presents a sort of agent-based model that reproduces the growth in the publication of junk science that we’ve seen in recent decades. Even before looking at this paper I was positively disposed toward it for two reasons. First because I do […] The post “The Natural Selection of Bad Science” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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“Replication initiatives will not salvage the trustworthiness of psychology”

May 31, 2016
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“Replication initiatives will not salvage the trustworthiness of psychology”

So says James Coyne, going full Meehl. I agree. Replication is great, but if you replicate noise studies, you’ll just get noise, hence the beneficial effects on science are (a) to reduce confidence in silly studies that we mostly shouldn’t have taken seriously in the first place, and (b) to provide an disincentive for future […] The post “Replication initiatives will not salvage the trustworthiness of psychology” appeared first on…

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All that really important statistics stuff that isn’t in the statistics textbooks

May 30, 2016
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All that really important statistics stuff that isn’t in the statistics textbooks

Kaiser writes: More on that work on age adjustment. I keep asking myself where is it in the Stats curriculum do we teach students this stuff? A class session focused on that analysis teaches students so much more about statistical thinking than anything we have in the textbooks. I’m not sure. This sort of analysis […] The post All that really important statistics stuff that isn’t in the statistics textbooks…

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Should he major in political science and minor in statistics or the other way around?

May 29, 2016
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Andrew Wheeler writes: I will be a freshman at the University of Florida this upcoming fall and I am interested in becoming a political pollster. My original question was whether I should major in political science and minor in statistics or the other way around, but any other general advice would be appreciated. My reply: […] The post Should he major in political science and minor in statistics or the…

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“99.60% for women and 99.58% for men, P < 0.05.”

May 26, 2016
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“99.60% for women and 99.58% for men, P < 0.05.”

Gur Huberman pointed me to this paper by Tamar Kricheli-Katz and Tali Regev, “How many cents on the dollar? Women and men in product markets.” It appeared in something called ScienceAdvances, which seems to be some extension of the Science brand, i.e., it’s in the tabloids! I’ll leave the critical analysis of this paper to […] The post “99.60% for women and 99.58% for men, P < 0.05.” appeared first…

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Now that’s what I call a power pose!

May 22, 2016
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Now that’s what I call a power pose!

John writes: See below for your humour file or blogging on a quiet day. . . . Perhaps you could start a competition for the wackiest real-life mangling of statistical concepts (restricted to a genuine academic setting?). On 15 Feb 2016, at 5:25 PM, [****] wrote: Pick of the bunch from tomorrow’s pile of applications […] The post Now that’s what I call a power pose! appeared first on Statistical…

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