Posts Tagged ‘ Miscellaneous Statistics ’

P-values and statistical practice

September 4, 2015
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What is a p-value in practice? The p-value is a measure of discrepancy of the fit of a model or “null hypothesis” H to data y. In theory the p-value is a continuous measure of evidence, but in practice it is typically trichotomized approximately into strong evidence, weak evidence, and no evidence (these can also […] The post P-values and statistical practice appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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To understand the replication crisis, imagine a world in which everything was published.

September 2, 2015
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To understand the replication crisis, imagine a world in which everything was published.

John Snow points me to this post by psychology researcher Lisa Feldman Barrett who reacted to the recent news on the non-replication of many psychology studies with a contrarian, upbeat take, entitled “Psychology Is Not in Crisis.” Here’s Barrett: An initiative called the Reproducibility Project at the University of Virginia recently reran 100 psychology experiments […] The post To understand the replication crisis, imagine a world in which everything was…

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Uri Simonsohn warns us not to be falsely reassured

August 31, 2015
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Uri Simonsohn warns us not to be falsely reassured

I agree with Uri Simonsohn that you don’t learn much by looking at the distribution of all the p-values that have appeared in some literature. Uri explains: Most p-values reported in most papers are irrelevant for the strategic behavior of interest. Covariates, manipulation checks, main effects in studies testing interactions, etc. Including them we underestimate […] The post Uri Simonsohn warns us not to be falsely reassured appeared first on…

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My 2 classes this fall

August 17, 2015
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Stat 6103, Bayesian Data Analysis Modern Bayesian methods offer an amazing toolbox for solving science and engineering problems. We will go through the book Bayesian Data Analysis and do applied statistical modeling using Stan, using R (or Python or Julia if you prefer) to preprocess the data and postprocess the analysis. We will also discuss […] The post My 2 classes this fall appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Neither time nor stomach

August 11, 2015
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Neither time nor stomach

Mark Palko writes: Thought you might be interested in an EngageNY lesson plan for statistics. So far no (-2)x(-2) = -4 (based on a quick read), but still kind of weak. It bothers me that they keep talking about randomization but only for order of test; they assigned treatment A to the first ten of […] The post Neither time nor stomach appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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Dan Kahan doesn’t trust the Turk

August 10, 2015
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Dan Kahan writes: I [Kahan] think serious journals should adopt policies announcing that they won’t accept studies that use M Turk samples for types of studies they are not suited for. . . . Here is my proposal: Pending a journal’s adoption of a uniform policy on M Turk samples, the journal should should oblige […] The post Dan Kahan doesn’t trust the Turk appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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If you leave your datasets sitting out on the counter, they get moldy

August 1, 2015
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I received the following in the email: I had a look at the dataset on speed dating you put online, and I found some big inconsistencies. Since a lot of people are using it, I hope this can help to fix them (or hopefully I did a mistake in interpreting the dataset). Here are the […] The post If you leave your datasets sitting out on the counter, they get…

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“We can keep debating this after 11 years, but I’m sure we all have much more pressing things to do (grants? papers? family time? attacking 11-year-old papers by former classmates? guitar practice?)”

July 28, 2015
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Someone pointed me to this discussion by Lior Pachter of a controversial claim in biology. The statistics The statistical content has to do with a biology paper by M. Kellis, B. W. Birren, and E.S. Lander from 2004 that contains the following passage: Strikingly, 95% of cases of accelerated evolution involve only one member of […] The post “We can keep debating this after 11 years, but I’m sure we…

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Ira Glass asks. We answer.

July 25, 2015
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Ira Glass asks.  We answer.

The celebrated radio quiz show star says: There’s this study done by the Pew Research Center and Smithsonian Magazine . . . they called up one thousand and one Americans. I do not understand why it is a thousand and one rather than just a thousand. Maybe a thousand and one just seemed sexier or […] The post Ira Glass asks. We answer. appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Measurement is part of design

July 17, 2015
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The other day, in the context of a discussion of an article from 1972, I remarked that the great statistician William Cochran, when writing on observational studies, wrote almost nothing about causality, nor did he mention selection or meta-analysis. It was interesting that these topics, which are central to any modern discussion of observational studies, […] The post Measurement is part of design appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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