Posts Tagged ‘ Miscellaneous Statistics ’

This company wants to hire people who can program in R or Python and do statistical modeling in Stan

May 24, 2017
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Doug Puett writes: I am a 2012 QMSS [Columbia University Quantitative Methods in Social Sciences] grad who is currently trying to build a Data Science/Quantitative UX team, and was hoping for some advice. I am finding myself having a hard time finding people who are really interested in understanding people and who especially are excited […] The post This company wants to hire people who can program in R or…

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Some natural solutions to the p-value communication problem—and why they won’t work.

May 21, 2017
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Some natural solutions to the p-value communication problem—and why they won’t work.

John Carlin and I write: It is well known that even experienced scientists routinely misinterpret p-values in all sorts of ways, including confusion of statistical and practical significance, treating non-rejection as acceptance of the null hypothesis, and interpreting the p-value as some sort of replication probability or as the posterior probability that the null hypothesis […] The post Some natural solutions to the p-value communication problem—and why they won’t work.…

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#NotAll4YearOlds

May 21, 2017
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I think there’s something wrong this op-ed by developmental psychologist Alison Gopnik, “4-year-olds don’t act like Trump,” and which begins, The analogy is pervasive among his critics: Donald Trump is like a child. . . . But the analogy is profoundly wrong, and it’s unfair to children. The scientific developmental research of the past 30 […] The post #NotAll4YearOlds appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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Hotel room aliases of the statisticians

May 20, 2017
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Hotel room aliases of the statisticians

Barry Petchesky writes: Below you’ll find a room list found before Game 1 at the Four Seasons in Houston (right across from the arena), where the Thunder were staying for their first-round series against the Rockets. We didn’t run it then because we didn’t want Rockets fans pulling the fire alarm or making late-night calls […] The post Hotel room aliases of the statisticians appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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Taking Data Journalism Seriously

May 16, 2017
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This is a bit of a followup to our recent review of “Everybody Lies.” While writing the review I searched the blog for mentions of Seth Stephens-Davidowitz, and I came across this post from last year, concerning a claim made by author J. D. Vance that “the middle part of America is more religious than […] The post Taking Data Journalism Seriously appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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Accounting for variation and uncertainty

May 12, 2017
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[cat picture] Yesterday I gave a list of the questions they’re asking me when I speak at the Journal of Accounting Research Conference. All kidding aside, I think that a conference of accountants is the perfect setting for a discussion of of research integrity, as accounting is all about setting up institutions to enable trust. […] The post Accounting for variation and uncertainty appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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A completely reasonable-sounding statement with which I strongly disagree

May 5, 2017
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From a couple years ago: In the context of a listserv discussion about replication in psychology experiments, someone wrote: The current best estimate of the effect size is somewhere in between the original study and the replication’s reported value. This conciliatory, split-the-difference statement sounds reasonable, and it might well represent good politics in the context […] The post A completely reasonable-sounding statement with which I strongly disagree appeared first on…

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7th graders trained to avoid Pizzagate-style data exploration—but is the training too rigid?

May 5, 2017
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[cat picture] Laura Kapitula writes: I wanted to share a cute story that gave me a bit of hope. My daughter who is in 7th grade was doing her science project. She had designed an experiment comparing lemon batteries to potato batteries, a 2×4 design with lemons or potatoes as one factor and number of […] The post 7th graders trained to avoid Pizzagate-style data exploration—but is the training too…

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What hypothesis testing is all about. (Hint: It’s not what you think.)

May 4, 2017
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From 2015: The conventional view: Hyp testing is all about rejection. The idea is that if you reject the null hyp at the 5% level, you have a win, you have learned that a certain null model is false and science has progressed, either in the glamorous “scientific revolution” sense that you’ve rejected a central […] The post What hypothesis testing is all about. (Hint: It’s not what you think.)…

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The statistical crisis in science: How is it relevant to clinical neuropsychology?

May 3, 2017
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[cat picture] Hilde Geurts and I write: There is currently increased attention to the statistical (and replication) crisis in science. Biomedicine and social psychology have been at the heart of this crisis, but similar problems are evident in a wide range of fields. We discuss three examples of replication challenges from the field of social […] The post The statistical crisis in science: How is it relevant to clinical neuropsychology?…

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