Posts Tagged ‘ Miscellaneous Statistics ’

All that really important statistics stuff that isn’t in the statistics textbooks

May 30, 2016
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All that really important statistics stuff that isn’t in the statistics textbooks

Kaiser writes: More on that work on age adjustment. I keep asking myself where is it in the Stats curriculum do we teach students this stuff? A class session focused on that analysis teaches students so much more about statistical thinking than anything we have in the textbooks. I’m not sure. This sort of analysis […] The post All that really important statistics stuff that isn’t in the statistics textbooks…

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Should he major in political science and minor in statistics or the other way around?

May 29, 2016
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Andrew Wheeler writes: I will be a freshman at the University of Florida this upcoming fall and I am interested in becoming a political pollster. My original question was whether I should major in political science and minor in statistics or the other way around, but any other general advice would be appreciated. My reply: […] The post Should he major in political science and minor in statistics or the…

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“99.60% for women and 99.58% for men, P < 0.05.”

May 26, 2016
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“99.60% for women and 99.58% for men, P < 0.05.”

Gur Huberman pointed me to this paper by Tamar Kricheli-Katz and Tali Regev, “How many cents on the dollar? Women and men in product markets.” It appeared in something called ScienceAdvances, which seems to be some extension of the Science brand, i.e., it’s in the tabloids! I’ll leave the critical analysis of this paper to […] The post “99.60% for women and 99.58% for men, P < 0.05.” appeared first…

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Now that’s what I call a power pose!

May 22, 2016
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Now that’s what I call a power pose!

John writes: See below for your humour file or blogging on a quiet day. . . . Perhaps you could start a competition for the wackiest real-life mangling of statistical concepts (restricted to a genuine academic setting?). On 15 Feb 2016, at 5:25 PM, [****] wrote: Pick of the bunch from tomorrow’s pile of applications […] The post Now that’s what I call a power pose! appeared first on Statistical…

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Happy talk, meet the Edlin factor

May 12, 2016
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Mark Palko points us to this op-ed in which psychiatrist Richard Friedman writes: There are also easy and powerful ways to enhance learning in young people. For example, there is intriguing evidence that the attitude that young people have about their own intelligence — and what their teachers believe — can have a big impact […] The post Happy talk, meet the Edlin factor appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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“Null hypothesis” = “A specific random number generator”

May 5, 2016
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In an otherwise pointless comment thread the other day, Dan Lakeland contributed the following gem: A p-value is the probability of seeing data as extreme or more extreme than the result, under the assumption that the result was produced by a specific random number generator (called the null hypothesis). I could care less about p-values […] The post “Null hypothesis” = “A specific random number generator” appeared first on Statistical…

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Gary Venter’s age-period-cohort decomposition of US male mortality trends

April 29, 2016
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Gary Venter’s age-period-cohort decomposition of US male mortality trends

Following up on yesterday’s post on mortality trends, I wanted to share with you a research note by actuary Gary Venter, “A Quick Look at Cohort Effects in US Male Mortality.” Venter produces this graph: And he writes: Cohort effects in mortality tend to be difficult to explain. Often strings of coincidences are invoked – […] The post Gary Venter’s age-period-cohort decomposition of US male mortality trends appeared first on…

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If Yogi Berra could see this one, he’d spin in his grave: Regression modeling using a convenience sample

April 26, 2016
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Kelvin Leshabari writes: We are currently planning to publish some few manuscripts on the outcome of treatment of some selected cancers occuring in children. The current dataset was derived from the natural admission process of those children with cancer found at a selected tertiary cancer centre. To the best of our understanding, our data are […] The post If Yogi Berra could see this one, he’d spin in his grave:…

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“Cancer Research Is Broken”

April 20, 2016
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Michael Oakes pointed me to this excellent news article by Daniel Engber, subtitled, “There’s a replication crisis in biomedicine—and no one even knows how deep it runs.” Engber suggests that the replication problem in biomedical research is worse than the much-publicized replication problem in psychology. One reason, which I didn’t see Engber discussing, is financial […] The post “Cancer Research Is Broken” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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“if you add a few more variables, you can do a better job at predictions”

April 19, 2016
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Ethan Bolker points me to this news article by Neil Irwin: Robert J. Gordon, an economist at Northwestern University, has his own version that he argues explains inflation levels throughout recent decades. But it is hardly simple. Its prediction for inflation relies not just on joblessness but also on measures of productivity growth, six shifts […] The post “if you add a few more variables, you can do a better…

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