Posts Tagged ‘ Miscellaneous Statistics ’

If you leave your datasets sitting out on the counter, they get moldy

August 1, 2015
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I received the following in the email: I had a look at the dataset on speed dating you put online, and I found some big inconsistencies. Since a lot of people are using it, I hope this can help to fix them (or hopefully I did a mistake in interpreting the dataset). Here are the […] The post If you leave your datasets sitting out on the counter, they get…

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“We can keep debating this after 11 years, but I’m sure we all have much more pressing things to do (grants? papers? family time? attacking 11-year-old papers by former classmates? guitar practice?)”

July 28, 2015
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Someone pointed me to this discussion by Lior Pachter of a controversial claim in biology. The statistics The statistical content has to do with a biology paper by M. Kellis, B. W. Birren, and E.S. Lander from 2004 that contains the following passage: Strikingly, 95% of cases of accelerated evolution involve only one member of […] The post “We can keep debating this after 11 years, but I’m sure we…

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Ira Glass asks. We answer.

July 25, 2015
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Ira Glass asks.  We answer.

The celebrated radio quiz show star says: There’s this study done by the Pew Research Center and Smithsonian Magazine . . . they called up one thousand and one Americans. I do not understand why it is a thousand and one rather than just a thousand. Maybe a thousand and one just seemed sexier or […] The post Ira Glass asks. We answer. appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Measurement is part of design

July 17, 2015
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The other day, in the context of a discussion of an article from 1972, I remarked that the great statistician William Cochran, when writing on observational studies, wrote almost nothing about causality, nor did he mention selection or meta-analysis. It was interesting that these topics, which are central to any modern discussion of observational studies, […] The post Measurement is part of design appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Survey weighting and regression modeling

July 14, 2015
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Yphtach Lelkes points us to a recent article on survey weighting by three economists, Gary Solon, Steven Haider, and Jeffrey Wooldridge, who write: We start by distinguishing two purposes of estimation: to estimate population descriptive statistics and to estimate causal effects. In the former type of research, weighting is called for when it is needed […] The post Survey weighting and regression modeling appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Don’t do the Wilcoxon

July 13, 2015
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Don’t do the Wilcoxon

The Wilcoxon test is a nonparametric rank-based test for comparing two groups. It’s a cool idea because, if data are continuous and there is no possibility of a tie, the reference distribution depends only on the sample size. There are no nuisance parameters, and the distribution can be tabulated. From a Bayesian point of view, […] The post Don’t do the Wilcoxon appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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Inauthentic leadership? Development and validation of methods-based criticism

July 11, 2015
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Thomas Basbøll writes: I need some help with a critique of a paper that is part of the apparently growing retraction scandal in leadership studies. Here’s Retraction Watch. The paper I want to look at is here: “Authentic Leadership: Development and Validation of a Theory-Based Measure” By F. O. Walumbwa, B. J. Avolio, W. L. […] The post Inauthentic leadership? Development and validation of methods-based criticism appeared first on Statistical…

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Discreteland and Continuousland

July 6, 2015
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Roy Mendelssohn points me to this paper by Jianqing Fan, Qi-Man Shao, and Wen-Xin Zhou, “Are Discoveries Spurious? Distributions of Maximum Spurious Correlations and Their Applications.” I never know what to think about these things because I don’t work in a discrete world in which there are zero effects (see our earlier discussion of the […] The post Discreteland and Continuousland appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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“Menstrual Cycle Phase Does Not Predict Political Conservatism”

July 5, 2015
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“Menstrual Cycle Phase Does Not Predict Political Conservatism”

Someone pointed me to this article by Isabel Scott and Nicholas Pound: Recent authors have reported a relationship between women’s fertility status, as indexed by menstrual cycle phase, and conservatism in moral, social and political values. We conducted a survey to test for the existence of a relationship between menstrual cycle day and conservatism. 2213 […] The post “Menstrual Cycle Phase Does Not Predict Political Conservatism” appeared first on Statistical…

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God is in every leaf of every probability puzzle

June 29, 2015
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Radford shared with us this probability puzzle of his from 1999: A couple you’ve just met invite you over to dinner, saying “come by around 5pm, and we can talk for a while before our three kids come home from school at 6pm”. You arrive at the appointed time, and are invited into the house. […] The post God is in every leaf of every probability puzzle appeared first on…

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