Posts Tagged ‘ Miscellaneous Statistics ’

A stunned Dyson

July 22, 2017
By

Terry Martin writes: I ran into this quote and thought you might enjoy it. It’s from p. 273 of Segre’s new biography of Fermi, The Pope of Physics: When Dyson met with him in 1953, Fermi welcomed him politely, but he quickly put aside the graphs he was being shown indicating agreement between theory and […] The post A stunned Dyson appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

Read more »

How does a Nobel-prize-winning economist become a victim of bog-standard selection bias?

July 20, 2017
By

Someone who wishes to remain anonymous writes in with a story: Linking to a new paper by Jorge Luis García, James J. Heckman, and Anna L. Ziff, an economist Sue Dynarski makes this “joke” on facebook—or maybe it’s not a joke: How does one adjust standard errors to account for the fact that N of […] The post How does a Nobel-prize-winning economist become a victim of bog-standard selection bias?…

Read more »

Classical statisticians as Unitarians

July 13, 2017
By
Classical statisticians as Unitarians

[cat picture] Christian Robert, Judith Rousseau, and I wrote: Several of the examples in [the book under review] represent solutions to problems that seem to us to be artificial or conventional tasks with no clear analogy to applied work. “They are artificial and are expressed in terms of a survey of 100 individuals expressing support […] The post Classical statisticians as Unitarians appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

Read more »

Clinical trials are broken. Here’s why.

July 12, 2017
By

Someone emailed me with some thoughts on systemic exertion intolerance disease, in particular, controversies regarding the Pace trial which evaluated psychological interventions for this condition or, should I say, set of conditions. I responded as follows: At one point I had the thought of doing a big investigative project on this, formally interviewing a bunch […] The post Clinical trials are broken. Here’s why. appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

Read more »

You can read two versions of this review essay on systemic exertion intolerance disease (chronic fatigue syndrome)

July 10, 2017
By

Julie Rehmeyer wrote a book, “Through the Shadowlands: A Science Writer’s Odyssey into an Illness Science Doesn’t Understand,” and my review appeared in the online New Yorker, much shortened and edited, and given the title, “A memoir of chronic fatigue illustrates the failures of medical research.” My original was titled, “Systemic exertion intolerance disease: The […] The post You can read two versions of this review essay on systemic exertion…

Read more »

My unpublished papers

July 7, 2017
By

My oldest unpublished paper dates from my sophomore year in college. I can’t remember the title or all the details, but it was a solution to a differential-difference equation. The story of how it came about is here. A couple years after figuring out the proof, I wrote it up and submitted it to a […] The post My unpublished papers appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

Read more »

Statisticians and economists agree: We should learn from data by “generating and revising models, hypotheses, and data analyzed in response to surprising findings.” (That’s what Bayesian data analysis is all about.)

July 6, 2017
By

Kevin Lewis points us to this article by economist James Heckman and statistician Burton Singer, who write: All analysts approach data with preconceptions. The data never speak for themselves. Sometimes preconceptions are encoded in precise models. Sometimes they are just intuitions that analysts seek to confirm and solidify. A central question is how to revise […] The post Statisticians and economists agree: We should learn from data by “generating and…

Read more »

“The Null Hypothesis Screening Fallacy”?

July 3, 2017
By

[non-cat picture] Rick Gerkin writes: A few months ago you posted your list of blog posts in draft stage and I noticed that “Humans Can Discriminate More than 1 Trillion Olfactory Stimuli. Not.” was still on that list. It was about some concerns I had about a paper in Science (http://science.sciencemag.org/content/343/6177/1370). After talking it through […] The post “The Null Hypothesis Screening Fallacy”? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

Read more »

Let’s stop talking about published research findings being true or false

June 29, 2017
By

I bear some of the blame for this. When I heard about John Ioannidis’s paper, “Why Most Published Research Findings Are False,” I thought it was cool. Ioannidis was on the same side as me, and Uri Simonsohn, and Greg Francis, and Paul Meehl, in the replication debate: he felt that there was a lot […] The post Let’s stop talking about published research findings being true or false appeared…

Read more »

Problems with the jargon “statistically significant” and “clinically significant”

June 26, 2017
By

Someone writes: After listening to your EconTalk episode a few weeks ago, I have a question about interpreting treatment effect magnitudes, effect sizes, SDs, etc. I studied Econ/Math undergrad and worked at a social science research institution in health policy as a research assistant, so I have a good amount of background. At the institution […] The post Problems with the jargon “statistically significant” and “clinically significant” appeared first on…

Read more »


Subscribe

Email:

  Subscribe