Posts Tagged ‘ Sports ’

It’s a Batsman’s World (Cup)

April 17, 2015
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It’s a Batsman’s World (Cup)

The 2015 Cricket World Cup rewrote the record books in dramatic fashion. Amidst the usual insanity that surrounds this event, there were some amazingly good - and bad - performances. Batting-wise, some of the previous records were smashed int...

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Adiabatic as I wanna be: Or, how is a chess rating like classical economics?

March 24, 2015
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Adiabatic as I wanna be:  Or, how is a chess rating like classical economics?

Chess ratings are all about change. Did your rating go up, did it go down, have you reached 2000, who’s hot, who’s not, and so on. If nobody’s abilities were changing, chess ratings would be boring, they’d be nothing but a noisy measure, and watching your rating change would be as exciting as watching a […] The post Adiabatic as I wanna be: Or, how is a chess rating like…

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The 1980 Math Olympiad Program: Where are they now?

March 17, 2015
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Brian Hunt: He was the #1 math team kid in our team (Montgomery County, Maryland). I think he came in first place in the international olympiad the next year (yup, here’s the announcement). We carpooled once or twice to county math team practices, and I remember that his mom would floor it rather than slow […] The post The 1980 Math Olympiad Program: Where are they now? appeared first on…

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Statistics job opening . . . at the NBA!

March 7, 2015
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Jason Rosenfeld writes: I work for the NBA League Office headquarters in New York City. I’m the Director of Basketball Analytics here at the NBA, and I’m again recruiting analysts. More information on the roles I’m trying to fill can be found here (peopleclick.com). I’m open to both undergraduate and graduate students. I’d be perfect […] The post Statistics job opening . . . at the NBA! appeared first on…

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Reflecting on Alamar’s reflection on sports data

March 2, 2015
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Ben Alamar reflects on the rise of data analytics in the NBA (link). I like this passage very much, which really nails home the point that good analytics requires intuition: The hours of waiting [during draft meetings] were often filled with watching film of prospects. It helped me refine my analysis, as I soaked up details from scouts that I never would have seen on my own. ("Rewind that. ...…

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Career NBA: The Road Least Traveled

February 27, 2015
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Career NBA: The Road Least Traveled

The bell rings - time to go to practice. Jarnell Stokes heads over to the gym, changes, and starts warming up with his teammates. It's his Junior year in high school. The Memphis, Tennessee native has a lot on his mind; soon he'll have to mak...

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Two Unrecognized Hall Of Fame Shortstops

February 12, 2015
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Michael Humphreys writes: Thought you might be interested in or might like to link to the following article. The statistical rigor is obviously not at a professional level, but pitched somewhere around the Bill Jamesian level. Here’s the link. This sort of thing makes me realize how out of it I am, when it comes […] The post Two Unrecognized Hall Of Fame Shortstops appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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The plagiarist next door

February 4, 2015
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In a comment on this chess-related post, Matt Gaffney pointed me to this wonderful page full of chess curiosities by Tim Krabbé. My nederlands is not what it used to be, but Krabbé has posted lots of material in English so that’s no problem. I started reading his “Open chess diary” (i.e., blog), it’s updated […] The post The plagiarist next door appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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Deflate-gate, Part 2: not average != extreme, and Sunday talk shows

February 2, 2015
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Last week, I pointed out the futility of using data as proof or disproof in Deflate-gate. Emphatically, a case of "N=All" does not make things better. I later edited the post for HBR (link). In this post, I want to address a couple of more subtle technical issues related to the Sharp analysis, which can be summarized as follows: 1. New England is an outlier in the plays per fumbles…

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Football and statistics, on HBR!

January 30, 2015
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I was asked to adapt my earlier post for the HBR audience, and the new version is now up on HBR. Here is the link. I'm happy that they picked up this post because most business problems concern reverse causation. A small subset of problems can be solved using A/B testing, but only those in which causes are known in advance and subject to manipulation. Even then, Facebook got into…

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