Posts Tagged ‘ Sports ’

Career NBA: The Road Least Traveled

February 27, 2015
By
Career NBA: The Road Least Traveled

The bell rings - time to go to practice. Jarnell Stokes heads over to the gym, changes, and starts warming up with his teammates. It's his Junior year in high school. The Memphis, Tennessee native has a lot on his mind; soon he'll have to mak...

Read more »

Two Unrecognized Hall Of Fame Shortstops

February 12, 2015
By

Michael Humphreys writes: Thought you might be interested in or might like to link to the following article. The statistical rigor is obviously not at a professional level, but pitched somewhere around the Bill Jamesian level. Here’s the link. This sort of thing makes me realize how out of it I am, when it comes […] The post Two Unrecognized Hall Of Fame Shortstops appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

Read more »

The plagiarist next door

February 4, 2015
By

In a comment on this chess-related post, Matt Gaffney pointed me to this wonderful page full of chess curiosities by Tim Krabbé. My nederlands is not what it used to be, but Krabbé has posted lots of material in English so that’s no problem. I started reading his “Open chess diary” (i.e., blog), it’s updated […] The post The plagiarist next door appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

Read more »

Deflate-gate, Part 2: not average != extreme, and Sunday talk shows

February 2, 2015
By

Last week, I pointed out the futility of using data as proof or disproof in Deflate-gate. Emphatically, a case of "N=All" does not make things better. I later edited the post for HBR (link). In this post, I want to address a couple of more subtle technical issues related to the Sharp analysis, which can be summarized as follows: 1. New England is an outlier in the plays per fumbles…

Read more »

Football and statistics, on HBR!

January 30, 2015
By

I was asked to adapt my earlier post for the HBR audience, and the new version is now up on HBR. Here is the link. I'm happy that they picked up this post because most business problems concern reverse causation. A small subset of problems can be solved using A/B testing, but only those in which causes are known in advance and subject to manipulation. Even then, Facebook got into…

Read more »

Crowdsourcing data analysis: Do soccer referees give more red cards to dark skin toned players?

January 27, 2015
By

Raphael Silberzahn Eric Luis Uhlmann Dan Martin Pasquale Anselmi Frederik Aust Eli Christopher Awtrey Štěpán Bahník Feng Bai Colin Bannard Evelina Bonnier Rickard Carlsson Felix Cheung Garret Christensen Russ Clay Maureen A. Craig Anna Dalla Rosa Lammertjan Dam Mathew H. Evans Ismael Flores Cervantes Nathan Fong Monica Gamez-Djokic Andreas Glenz Shauna Gordon-McKeon Tim Heaton Karin […] The post Crowdsourcing data analysis: Do soccer referees give more red cards to dark…

Read more »

Limits of statistics, and by extension data science, as illustrated by Deflate-gate

January 27, 2015
By
Limits of statistics, and by extension data science, as illustrated by Deflate-gate

A number of readers sent me Warren Sharp's piece about the ongoing New England Patriots' deflate-gate scandal (link to Slate's version of this) so I suppose I should say something about it. For those readers who are not into American football, the Superbowl is soon upon us. New England, one of the two finalists, has been accused of using footballs that are below the weight requirements on the rulebook, hence…

Read more »

Debate on using margin of error with non-probability panels

January 22, 2015
By
Debate on using margin of error with non-probability panels

Tomorrow (Thurs 22 Jan) at 2pm, I’m participating (along with Jane Tang, John Bremer, Nancy Brigham, and Steve Mossup) on an online discussion, moderated by Annie Pettit, on the above topic. Here’s the description: Most marketing researchers know that using Margin of Error with convenience samples, non-probability samples, and online research panels is inappropriate. However, […] The post Debate on using margin of error with non-probability panels appeared first on…

Read more »

Stan comes through . . . again!

January 14, 2015
By
Stan comes through . . . again!

Erikson Kaszubowski writes in: I missed your call for Stan research stories, but the recent post about stranded dolphins mentioned it again. When I read about the Crowdstorming project in your blog, I thought it would be a good project to apply my recent studies in Bayesian modeling. The project coordinators shared a big dataset […] The post Stan comes through . . . again! appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

Read more »

Try answering this question without heading to Wikipedia

December 27, 2014
By

Phil writes: This is kind of fun (at least for me): You would probably guess, correctly, that membership in the US Chess Federation is lower than its peak. Guess the year of peak membership, and the decline (as a percentage) in the number of members from that peak. My reply: I don’t know, but I’d […] The post Try answering this question without heading to Wikipedia appeared first on Statistical…

Read more »


Subscribe

Email:

  Subscribe