Posts Tagged ‘ Sports ’

Hey, I forgot to include a cat picture in my previous post!

December 7, 2016
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Hey, I forgot to include a cat picture in my previous post!

Josh Miller fixes it for me: The post Hey, I forgot to include a cat picture in my previous post! appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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a2

November 22, 2016
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a2

Wow. P.S. In the comment thread, Peter Dorman has an interesting discussion of Carlsen’s errors so far during the tournament. The post a2 appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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Josh Miller hot hand talks in NYC and Pittsburgh this week

November 15, 2016
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Josh Miller hot hand talks in NYC and Pittsburgh this week

Joshua Miller (the person who, with Adam Sanjurjo, discovered why the so-called “hot hand fallacy” is not really a fallacy) will be speaking on the topic this week. In New York, Thurs 17 Nov, 12:30pm, 19 W 4th St, room 517, Center for Experimental Social Science seminar. In Pittsburgh, Fri 18 Nov, 12pm, 4716 Posvsar […] The post Josh Miller hot hand talks in NYC and Pittsburgh this week appeared…

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“The Warriors suck”: A Bayesian exploration

October 29, 2016
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“The Warriors suck”:  A Bayesian exploration

A basketball fan of my close acquaintance woke up Wednesday morning and, upon learning the outcome of the first games of the NBA season, announced that “The Warriors suck.” Can we answer this question? To put it more precisely, how much information is supplied by that first-game-of-season blowout? Speaking Bayesianly, who much should we adjust […] The post “The Warriors suck”: A Bayesian exploration appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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Some people are so easy to contact and some people aren’t.

October 16, 2016
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Some people are so easy to contact and some people aren’t.

I was reading Cowboys Full, James McManus’s entertaining history of poker (but way too much on the so-called World Series of Poker), and I skimmed the index to look up some of my favorite poker writers. Frank Wallace and David Spanier were both there but only got brief mentions in the text, I was disappointed […] The post Some people are so easy to contact and some people aren’t. appeared…

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No, I don’t think the Super Bowl is lowering birth weights

October 10, 2016
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No, I don’t think the Super Bowl is lowering birth weights

In a news article entitled, “Inequality might start before we’re even born,” Carolyn Johnson reports: Another study, forthcoming in the Journal of Human Resources, analyzed birth outcomes in counties where the home team goes to the Super Bowl. . . . The researchers found that women in their first trimester whose home team played in […] The post No, I don’t think the Super Bowl is lowering birth weights appeared…

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Astroturf “patient advocacy” group pushes to keep drug prices high

October 2, 2016
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Astroturf “patient advocacy” group pushes to keep drug prices high

Susan Perry tells the story: Patients Rising, [reporter Trudy Lieberman] reports, was founded by Jonathan Wilcox, a corporate communications and public relations consultant and adjunct professor at USC’s Annenberg School of Communications and his wife, Terry, a producer of oncology videos. . . . Both Wilcox and his wife had worked with Vital Options International, […] The post Astroturf “patient advocacy” group pushes to keep drug prices high appeared first…

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Don’t trust Rasmussen polls!

October 1, 2016
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Don’t trust Rasmussen polls!

Political scientist Alan Abramowitz brings us some news about the notorious pollster: In the past 12 months, according to Real Clear Politics, there have been 72 national polls matching Clinton with Trump—16 polls conducted by Fox News or Rasmussen and 56 polls conducted by other polling organizations. Here are the results: Trump has led or […] The post Don’t trust Rasmussen polls! appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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I refuse to blog about this one

September 27, 2016
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I refuse to blog about this one

Shravan points me to this article, Twitter Language Use Reflects Psychological Differences between Democrats and Republicans, which begins with the following self-parody of an abstract: Previous research has shown that political leanings correlate with various psychological factors. While surveys and experiments provide a rich source of information for political psychology, data from social networks can […] The post I refuse to blog about this one appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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Stan wins again!

September 12, 2016
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Stan wins again!

See here. The post Stan wins again! appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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