Posts Tagged ‘ Sports ’

I refuse to blog about this one

September 27, 2016
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I refuse to blog about this one

Shravan points me to this article, Twitter Language Use Reflects Psychological Differences between Democrats and Republicans, which begins with the following self-parody of an abstract: Previous research has shown that political leanings correlate with various psychological factors. While surveys and experiments provide a rich source of information for political psychology, data from social networks can […] The post I refuse to blog about this one appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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Stan wins again!

September 12, 2016
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Stan wins again!

See here. The post Stan wins again! appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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Lining up the dopers and their medals

August 25, 2016
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Lining up the dopers and their medals

The Times did a great job making this graphic (this snapshot is just the top half): A lot of information is packed into a small space. It's easy to compose the story in our heads. For example, Lee Chong Wai,...

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Counting the Olympic medals

August 15, 2016
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Counting the Olympic medals

Reader Conor H. sent in this daily medals table at the NBC website: He commented that the bars are not quite the right lengths. So even though China and Russia both won five total medals that day, the bar for...

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NBA in NYC

August 11, 2016
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NBA in NYC

Jason Rosenfeld writes: We’re holding the first ever NBA Basketball Analytics Hackathon on Saturday, September 24 at Terminal 23 in midtown Manhattan. I can’t guarantee that Bugs will be there, but ya never know! The post NBA in NYC appear...

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George Orwell on the Olympics

August 11, 2016
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George Orwell on the Olympics

From 1945: If you wanted to add to the vast fund of ill-will existing in the world at this moment, you could hardly do it better than by a series of football matches between Jews and Arabs, Germans and Czechs, Indians and British, Russians and Poles, and Italians and Jugoslavs, each match to be watched […] The post George Orwell on the Olympics appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Shameless little bullies claim that published triathlon times don’t replicate

August 8, 2016
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Shameless little bullies claim that published triathlon times don’t replicate

Paul Alper sends along this inspiring story of Julie Miller, a heroic triathlete who just wants to triathle in peace, but she keeps getting hassled by the replication police. Those shameless little bullies won’t let her just do her thing, instead they harp on technicalities like missing timing clips and crap like that. Who cares […] The post Shameless little bullies claim that published triathlon times don’t replicate appeared first…

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Various ways of showing distributions

August 4, 2016
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Various ways of showing distributions

The other day, a chart about the age distribution of Olympic athletes caught my attention. I found the chart on Google but didn't bookmark it and now I couldn't retrieve it. From my mind's eye, the chart looks like this:...

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It’s more important to know the source than the value of a number

July 12, 2016
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Here we go again. ABC News reported that Ricky Williams, former NFL star, proclaimed himself as holding "the world record for most times drug tested". (link) He said he was tested 500 times. During this 11-year career, Williams failed the test four times. So there is one thing we know - the drug testing regime is not much of a deterrent. Since the athlete knows when he is juicing or…

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Should this paper in Psychological Science be retracted? The data do not conclusively demonstrate the claim, nor do they provide strong evidence in favor. The data are, however, consistent with the claim (as well as being consistent with no effect)

June 28, 2016
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Should this paper in Psychological Science be retracted?  The data do not conclusively demonstrate the claim, nor do they provide strong evidence in favor.  The data are, however, consistent with the claim (as well as being consistent with no effect)

Retractions or corrections of published papers are rare. We routinely encounter articles with fatal flaws, but it is so rare that such articles are retracted that it’s news when it happens. Retractions sometimes happen at the request of the author (as in the link above, or in my own two retracted/corrected articles) and other times […] The post Should this paper in Psychological Science be retracted? The data do not…

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