Posts Tagged ‘ Sports ’

Popular expert explains why communists can’t win chess championships!

December 4, 2017
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Popular expert explains why communists can’t win chess championships!

[cat picture] We haven’t run any Ray Keene material for awhile but this is just too good to pass up: Yup, those communists have real trouble pushing to the top when it comes to chess, huh? P.S. to Chrissy: If you happen to be reading this, my advice to you is to not take stuff […] The post Popular expert explains why communists can’t win chess championships! appeared first on…

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A new definition of the nerd?

December 2, 2017
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Jonathan Falk points to this book excerpt by Michael Lewis, who writes: A lot of what people did and said when they “predicted” things, Morey now realized, was phony: pretending to know things rather than actually knowing things. There were a great many interesting questions in the world to which the only honest answer was, […] The post A new definition of the nerd? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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High five: “Now if it is from 2010, I think we can make all sorts of assumptions about the statistical methods without even looking.”

November 14, 2017
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Eric Tassone writes: Have you seen this? “Suns Tracking High Fives to Measure Team Camaraderie.” Key passage: Although this might make basketball analytic experts scoff, there is actually some science behind the theory. Dacher Keltner, Professor of Psychology at UC Berkeley, in 2015 took one game of every NBA team at the start of the […] The post High five: “Now if it is from 2010, I think we can…

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Why you can’t simply estimate the hot hand using regression

November 6, 2017
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Jacob Schumaker writes: Reformed political scientist, now software engineer here. Re: the hot hand fallacy fallacy from Miller and Sanjurjo, has anyone discussed why a basic regression doesn’t solve this? If they have I haven’t seen it. The idea is just that there are other ways of measuring the hot hand. When I think of […] The post Why you can’t simply estimate the hot hand using regression appeared first…

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If you want to know about basketball, who ya gonna trust, a mountain of p-values . . . or that poseur Phil Jackson??

October 26, 2017
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Someone points me with amusement to this published article from 2012: Beliefs About the “Hot Hand” in Basketball Across the Adult Life Span Alan Castel, Aimee Drolet Rossi, and Shannon McGillivray University of California, Los Angeles Many people believe in streaks. In basketball, belief in the “hot hand” occurs when people think a player is […] The post If you want to know about basketball, who ya gonna trust, a…

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Why I think the top batting average will be higher than .311: Over-pooling of point predictions in Bayesian inference

October 19, 2017
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In a post from 22 May 2017 entitled, “Who is Going to Win the Batting Crown?”, Jim Albert writes: At this point in the season, folks are interested in extreme stats and want to predict final season measures. On the morning of Saturday May 20, here are the leading batting averages: Justin Turner .379 Ryan […] The post Why I think the top batting average will be higher than .311:…

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Baseball, apple pie, and Stan

October 16, 2017
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Ben sends along these two baseball job ads that mention experience with Stan as a preferred qualification: St. Louis Cardinals Baseball Development Analyst Tampa Bay Rays Baseball Research and Development Analyst The post Baseball, apple pie, and Stan ...

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Does racquetball save lives?

October 12, 2017
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Asher Meir points to this news report and writes: 8e5 people in study, about half reported exercising, about half not. About 10% died overall. So overall death rate difference of 28% is pretty remarkable. It means about 3500 deaths instead of 4500 for a similar sample size. But when you compare the rate of heart […] The post Does racquetball save lives? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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Report from the NBA Hackathon 2017

September 25, 2017
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Report from the NBA Hackathon 2017

Kaiser Fung, founder of Junk Charts and Principal Analytics Prep, reports on his experience as a judge in the NBA Hackathon, held on September 23-24, 2017 in New York City.

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Further evidence that creativity and innovation are stimulated by college sports: Evidence from a big regression

September 25, 2017
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Kevin Lewis sent along this paper from the Creativity Research Journal: Further Evidence that Creativity and Innovation are Inhibited by Conservative Thinking: Analyses of the 2016 Presidential Election The investigation replicated and extended previous research showing a negative relationship between conservatism and creative accomplishment. Conservatism was estimated, as in previous research, from voting patterns. The […] The post Further evidence that creativity and innovation are stimulated by college sports: Evidence…

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