Posts Tagged ‘ Sports ’

Splitsville for Thiel and Kasparov?

May 23, 2016
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The tech zillionaire and the chess champion were always a bit of an odd couple, and I’ve felt for awhile that it was just as well that they never finished that book they were talking about. But given that each of them has taken a second career in political activism, I can’t imagine that they’re […] The post Splitsville for Thiel and Kasparov? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Nick and Nate and Mark on Leicester and Trump

May 20, 2016
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Just following up on our post the other day on retrospective evaluations of probabilistic predictions: For more on Leicester City, see Nick Goff on Why did bookmakers lose on Leicester? and What price SHOULD Leicester have been? (forwarded to me by commenter Iggy). For more on Trump, see Nate Silver on How I Acted Like […] The post Nick and Nate and Mark on Leicester and Trump appeared first on…

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Beautiful Graphs for Baseball Strike-Count Performance

May 16, 2016
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Beautiful Graphs for Baseball Strike-Count Performance

This post is by Bob. I have no idea what Andrew will make of these graphs; I’ve been hoping to gather enough comments from him to code up a ggplot theme. Shravan, you can move along, there’s nothing here but baseball. Jim Albert created some great graphs for strike-count performance in a series of two […] The post Beautiful Graphs for Baseball Strike-Count Performance appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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Leicester City and Donald Trump: How to think about predictions and longshot victories?

May 13, 2016
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Leicester City and Donald Trump:  How to think about predictions and longshot victories?

Leicester City was a 5000-to-1 shot to win the championship—and they did it. Donald Trump wasn’t supposed to win the Republican nomination—last summer Nate gave him a 2% chance—and it looks like he will win. For that matter, Nate only gave Bernie Sanders a 7% chance, and he came pretty close. Soccer There’s been a […] The post Leicester City and Donald Trump: How to think about predictions and longshot…

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Super-informative ping-pong graphic

May 11, 2016
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Super-informative ping-pong graphic

Via Twitter, Mike W. asked me to comment on this WSJ article about ping pong tables. According to the article, ping pong table sales track venture-capital deal flow: This chart is super-informative. I learned a lot from this chart, including:...

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MAPKIA 2: Josh and Drew shred the CCP/APPC “Political Polarization Literacy” test!

May 11, 2016
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MAPKIA 2:  Josh and Drew shred the CCP/APPC “Political Polarization Literacy” test!

Just like the original Jaws 2, this story features neither Richard Dreyfus nor Steven Spielberg. It all started when Dan Kahan sent me the following puzzle: Match the resonses of large nationally representative sample to supporting these policy items. I let this languish in my inbox for awhile until Kahan taunted me by letting me […] The post MAPKIA 2: Josh and Drew shred the CCP/APPC “Political Polarization Literacy” test!…

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Bill James does model checking

May 9, 2016
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Bill James does model checking

Regular readers will know that Bill James was one of my inspirations for becoming a statistician. I happened to be browsing through the Bill James Historical Baseball Abstract the other day and came across this passage on Glenn Hubbard, who he ranks as the 88th best second baseman of all time: Total Baseball has Glenn […] The post Bill James does model checking appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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“Kasparov To Face Caruana, Nakamura, So In Ultimate Blitz Challenge”

April 28, 2016
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E. J. pointed me to this announcement: For the first time since his retirement in 2005 Garry Kasparov will play chess against some of the best players on the planet. The 13th world champion agreed to meet the top three finishers of the 2016 U.S. Championship in a blitz tournament. That turned out to be […] The post “Kasparov To Face Caruana, Nakamura, So In Ultimate Blitz Challenge” appeared first…

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64 Shades of Gray: The subtle effect of chessboard images on foreign policy polarization

April 27, 2016
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64 Shades of Gray:  The subtle effect of chessboard images on foreign policy polarization

Brian Nosek pointed me to this 2013 paper by Theodora Zarkadi and Simone Schnall, “‘Black and White’ thinking: Visual contrast polarizes moral judgment,” which begins: Recent research has emphasized the role of intuitive processes in morality by documenting the link between affect and moral judgment. The present research tested whether incidental visual cues without any […] The post 64 Shades of Gray: The subtle effect of chessboard images on foreign…

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DG XXXVII: Lumosity fined $2 million for deceiving customers about its “brain training” programs

April 18, 2016
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Paul Alper writes: Because you went to MIT and are a chess enthusiast, you probably know a lot more about Claude Shannon than I do. However, did you know that as intellectually brilliant as he was, he died of “after a long battle with Alzheimer’s disease”? I bring up this factoid because it sort of […] The post DG XXXVII: Lumosity fined $2 million for deceiving customers about its “brain…

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