Posts Tagged ‘ Political Science ’

Discussion of “A probabilistic model for the spatial distribution of party support in multiparty elections”

August 27, 2014
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From 1994. I don’t have much to say about this one. The paper I was discussing (by Samuel Merrill) had already been accepted by the journal—I might even have been a referee, in which case the associate editor had decided to accept the paper over my objections—and the editor gave me the opportunity to publish […] The post Discussion of “A probabilistic model for the spatial distribution of party support…

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Review of “Forecasting Elections”

August 26, 2014
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From 1993. The topic of election forecasting sure gets a lot more attention than it used to! Here are some quotes from my review of that book by Michael Lewis-Beck and Tom Rice: Political scientists are aware that most voters are consistent in their preferences, and one can make a good guess just looking at […] The post Review of “Forecasting Elections” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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Recently in the sister blog

August 22, 2014
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Recently in the sister blog

Meritocracy won’t happen: the problem’s with the ‘ocracy’ Does the sex of your child affect your political attitudes? More hype about political attitudes and neuroscience Modern polling needs innovation, not traditionalism Who cares about copycat pollsters? The mythical swing voter Mythical swing voter update No, all Americans are not created equal when it comes to […] The post Recently in the sister blog appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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“Psychohistory” and the hype paradox

August 15, 2014
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“Psychohistory” and the hype paradox

Lee Wilkinson writes: I thought you might be interested in this post. I was asked about this by someone at Skytree and replied with this link to Tyler Vigen’s Spurious Correlations. What’s most interesting about Vigen’s site is not his video (he doesn’t go into the dangers of correlating time series, for example), but his […] The post “Psychohistory” and the hype paradox appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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How do you interpret standard errors from a regression fit to the entire population?

August 12, 2014
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James Keirstead writes: I’m working on some regressions for UK cities and have a question about how to interpret regression coefficients. . . . In a typical regression, one would be working with data from a sample and so the standard errors on the coefficients can be interpreted as reflecting the uncertainty in the choice […] The post How do you interpret standard errors from a regression fit to the…

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Cool new position available: Director of the Pew Research Center Labs

August 10, 2014
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Peter Henne writes: I wanted to let you know about a new opportunity at Pew Research Center for a data scientist that might be relevant to some of your colleagues. I [Henne] am a researcher with the Pew Research Center, where I manage an international index on religious issues. I am also working with others […] The post Cool new position available: Director of the Pew Research Center Labs appeared…

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President of American Association of Buggy-Whip Manufacturers takes a strong stand against internal combustion engine, argues that the so-called “automobile” has “little grounding in theory” and that “results can vary widely based on the particular fuel that is used”

August 6, 2014
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President of American Association of Buggy-Whip Manufacturers takes a strong stand against internal combustion engine, argues that the so-called “automobile” has “little grounding in theory” and that “results can vary widely based on the particular fuel that is used”

Some people pointed me to this official statement signed by Michael Link, president of the American Association for Public Opinion Research (AAPOR). My colleague David Rothschild and I wrote a measured response to Link’s statement which I posted on the sister blog. But then I made the mistake of actually reading what Link wrote, and […] The post President of American Association of Buggy-Whip Manufacturers takes a strong stand against…

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Scientific communication by press release

August 6, 2014
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Hector Cordero-Guzman writes: I have a question for you about an ongoing congroversy\incident related to reporting of social science research. Please see article linked below if you have a chance. I think this incident exposes real problems in the way social science research is presented and how it reaches the public… http://www.latinorebels.com/2014/05/22/new-york-times-piece-on-hispanics-and-census-based-on-study-not-yet-finalized-or-public/ Essentially, we have […] The post Scientific communication by press release appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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The health policy innovation center: how best to move from pilot studies to large-scale practice?

July 31, 2014
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A colleague pointed me to this news article regarding evaluation of new health plans: The Affordable Care Act would fund a new research outfit evocatively named the Innovation Center to discover how to most effectively deliver health care, with $10 billion to spend over a decade. But now that the center has gotten started, many […] The post The health policy innovation center: how best to move from pilot studies…

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Yummy Mr. P!

July 28, 2014
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Yummy Mr. P!

Chris Skovron writes: A colleague sent the attached image from Indonesia. For whatever reason, it seems appropriate that Mr. P is a delicious salty snack with the tagline “good times.” Indeed. MRP has made the New York Times and Indonesian s...

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