Posts Tagged ‘ Political Science ’

Can somebody please untangle this one for us? Are centrists more, or less, supportive of democracy, compared to political extremists?

June 13, 2018
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Can somebody please untangle this one for us?  Are centrists more, or less, supportive of democracy, compared to political extremists?

OK, this is a nice juicy problem for a political science student . . . Act 1: “Centrists Are the Most Hostile to Democracy, Not Extremists” David Adler writes in the New York Times: My research suggests that across Europe and North America, centrists are the least supportive of democracy, the least committed to its […] The post Can somebody please untangle this one for us? Are centrists more, or…

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Oxycontin, Purdue Pharma, the Sackler family, and the FDA

June 8, 2018
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I just read this horrifying magazine article by Patrick Radden Keefe: The Family That Built an Empire of Pain: The Sackler dynasty’s ruthless marketing of painkillers has generated billions of dollars—and millions of addicts. You really have to read the whole thing, because it’s just one story after another of bad behavior, people getting rich […] The post Oxycontin, Purdue Pharma, the Sackler family, and the FDA appeared first on…

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Oxycontin, Purdue Pharma, the Sackler family, and the FDA

June 8, 2018
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I just read this horrifying magazine article by Patrick Radden Keefe: The Family That Built an Empire of Pain: The Sackler dynasty’s ruthless marketing of painkillers has generated billions of dollars—and millions of addicts. You really have to read the whole thing, because it’s just one story after another of bad behavior, people getting rich […] The post Oxycontin, Purdue Pharma, the Sackler family, and the FDA appeared first on…

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Average predictive comparisons and the All Else Equal fallacy

June 6, 2018
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Annie Wang writes: I’m a law student (and longtime reader of the blog), and I’m writing to flag a variant of the “All Else Equal” fallacy in ProPublica’s article on the COMPAS Risk Recidivism Algorithm. The article analyzes how statistical risk assessments, which are used in sentencing and bail hearings, are racially biased. (Although this […] The post Average predictive comparisons and the All Else Equal fallacy appeared first on…

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Against Screening

June 3, 2018
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Matthew Simonson writes: I have a question that may be of interest to your readers (and even if not, I’d love to hear your response). I’ve been analyzing a dataset of over 100 Middle Eastern political groups (MAROB) to see how these groups react to government repression. Observations are at the group-year level and include […] The post Against Screening appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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Some experiments are just too noisy to tell us much of anything at all: Political science edition

May 29, 2018
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Some experiments are just too noisy to tell us much of anything at all:  Political science edition

Sointu Leikas pointed us to this published research article, “Exposure to inequality affects support for redistribution.” Leikas writes that “it seems to be a really apt example of “researcher degrees of freedom.'” Here’s the abstract of the paper: As the world’s population grows more urban, encounters between members of different socioeconomic groups occur with greater […] The post Some experiments are just too noisy to tell us much of anything…

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Tali Sharot responds to my comments on a recent op-ed

May 27, 2018
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Yesterday I posted some comments on an op-ed by by Tali Sharot and Cass Sunstein. Sharot sent the following response: I wanted to correct a few inaccuracies, which two of your commenters were quick to catch (Jeff and Dale). It seems you have 3 objections 1. “Participants did not learn about others’ opinions. There were […] The post Tali Sharot responds to my comments on a recent op-ed appeared first…

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Click here to find out how these 2 top researchers hyped their work in a NYT op-ed!

May 26, 2018
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Gur Huberman pointed me to this NYT op-ed entitled “Would You Go to a Republican Doctor?”, written by two professors describing their own research, that begins as follows: Suppose you need to see a dermatologist. Your friend recommends a doctor, explaining that “she trained at the best hospital in the country and is regarded as […] The post Click here to find out how these 2 top researchers hyped their…

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Regularized Prediction and Poststratification (the generalization of Mister P)

May 19, 2018
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This came up in comments recently so I thought I’d clarify the point. Mister P is MRP, multilevel regression and poststratification. The idea goes like this: 1. You want to adjust for differences between sample and population. Let y be your outcome of interest and X be your demographic and geographic variables you’d like to […] The post Regularized Prediction and Poststratification (the generalization of Mister P) appeared first on…

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No, there is no epidemic of loneliness. (Or, Dog Bites Man: David Brooks runs another column based on fake stats)

May 16, 2018
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[adorable image] Remember David Brooks? The NYT columnist, NPR darling, and former reporter who couldn’t correctly report the price of a meal at Red Lobster? The guy who got it wrong about where billionaires come from and who thought it was fun to use one of his columns to make fun of a urologist (ha […] The post No, there is no epidemic of loneliness. (Or, Dog Bites Man: David…

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