Posts Tagged ‘ Political Science ’

5 more things I learned from the 2016 election

December 10, 2016
By

After posting the 19 Things We Learned from the 2016 Election, I received a bunch of helpful feedback in comments and email. Here are some of the key points that I missed or presented unclearly: Non-presidential elections Nadia Hassan points out that my article is “so focused on the Presidential race than it misses some […] The post 5 more things I learned from the 2016 election appeared first on…

Read more »

19 Things We Learned from the 2016 Election

December 8, 2016
By

OK, we can all agree that the November election result was a shocker. According to news reports, even the Trump campaign team was stunned to come up a winner. So now seemed like a good time to go over various theories floating around in political science and political reporting and see where they stand, now […] The post 19 Things We Learned from the 2016 Election appeared first on Statistical…

Read more »

Mighty oaks from little acorns grow

December 5, 2016
By
Mighty oaks from little acorns grow

Eric Loken writes: Do by any chance remember the bogus survey that Augusta National carried out in 2002 to deflect criticism about not having any female members? I even remember this survey being ridiculed by ESPN who said their polls showed much more support for a boycott and sympathy with Martha Burke. Anyway, sure that’s […] The post Mighty oaks from little acorns grow appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

Read more »

Some U.S. demographic data at zipcode level conveniently in R

December 2, 2016
By

Ari Lamstein writes: I chuckled when I read your recent “R Sucks” post. Some of the comments were a bit … heated … so I thought to send you an email instead. I agree with your point that some of the datasets in R are not particularly relevant. The way that I’ve addressed that is […] The post Some U.S. demographic data at zipcode level conveniently in R appeared first…

Read more »

Survey weighting and that 2% swing

December 1, 2016
By
Survey weighting and that 2% swing

Nate Silver agrees with me that much of that shocking 2% swing can be explained by systematic differences between sample and population: survey respondents included too many Clinton supporters, even after corrections from existing survey adjustments. In Nate’s words, “Pollsters Probably Didn’t Talk To Enough White Voters Without College Degrees.” Last time we looked carefully […] The post Survey weighting and that 2% swing appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

Read more »

An exciting new entry in the “clueless graphs from clueless rich guys” competition

November 30, 2016
By
An exciting new entry in the “clueless graphs from clueless rich guys” competition

Jeff Lax points to this post from Matt Novak linking to a post by Matt Taibbi that shares the above graph from newspaper columnist / rich guy Thomas Friedman. I’m not one to spend precious blog space mocking bad graphs, so I’ll refer you to Novak and Taibbi for the details. One thing I do […] The post An exciting new entry in the “clueless graphs from clueless rich guys”…

Read more »

Interesting epi paper using Stan

November 30, 2016
By

Jon Zelner writes: Just thought I’d send along this paper by Justin Lessler et al. Thought it was both clever & useful and a nice ad for using Stan for epidemiological work. Basically, what this paper is about is estimating the true prevalence and case fatality ratio of MERS-CoV [Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Infection] […] The post Interesting epi paper using Stan appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

Read more »

OK, sometimes the concept of “false positive” makes sense.

November 28, 2016
By
OK, sometimes the concept of “false positive” makes sense.

Paul Alper writes: I know by searching your blog that you hold the position, “I’m negative on the expression ‘false positives.'” Nevertheless, I came across this. In the medical/police/judicial world, false positive is a very serious issue: $2 Cost of a typical roadside drug test kit used by police departments. Namely, is that white powder […] The post OK, sometimes the concept of “false positive” makes sense. appeared first on…

Read more »

An election just happened and I can’t stop talking about it

November 27, 2016
By
An election just happened and I can’t stop talking about it

Some things I’ve posted elsewhere: The Electoral College magnifies the power of white voters (with Pierre-Antoine Kremp) I’m not impressed by this claim of vote rigging And, in case you missed it: Explanations for that shocking 2% shift Coming soon: What theories in political science got supported or shot down by the 2016 election? (with […] The post An election just happened and I can’t stop talking about it appeared…

Read more »

“US Election Analysis 2016: Media, Voters and the Campaign”

November 20, 2016
By

Darren Lilleker, Einar Thorsen, Daniel Jackson, and Anastasia Veneti edited this insta-book of post-election analyses. Actually, at least one of these chapters was written before the election. When the editors asked me if I could contribute to this book, I said, sure, and I pointed them to this article from a few weeks ago, “Trump-Clinton […] The post “US Election Analysis 2016: Media, Voters and the Campaign” appeared first on…

Read more »


Subscribe

Email:

  Subscribe