Posts Tagged ‘ Political Science ’

Ready Money

December 16, 2017
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Richard Reeves writes: Most of the people on the highest rung [which he elsewhere defines as the highest fifth of the income distribution] in America are in denial about their privilege. The American myth of meritocracy allows them to attribute their position to their brilliance and diligence, rather than to luck or a rigged system. […] The post Ready Money appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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Loss of confidence

December 7, 2017
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Loss of confidence

This fascinating post by David Weakliem documents declining confidence in political institutions: and the news media: and some other institutions: As Weakliem writes: So far, confidence in everything has declined. You could offer specific explanations for each one, but the fact that it’s so widespread suggests that the declines reflect a general mood of dissatisfaction. […] The post Loss of confidence appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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How to improve this visualization of voting in the U.S. Congress?

November 30, 2017
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How to improve this visualization of voting in the U.S. Congress?

Richie Lionell points us to this interactive visualization of votes of U.S. Senators. It’s attractive. My big problem is that nothing is conveyed by the positions of the points along the circles. Thus, that cute image of the points moving around is a bit misleading. Maybe someone has a suggestion of how to do this […] The post How to improve this visualization of voting in the U.S. Congress? appeared…

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We start by talking reproducible research, then we drift to a discussion of voter turnout

November 21, 2017
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We start by talking reproducible research, then we drift to a discussion of voter turnout

Emil Kirkegaard writes: Regarding data sharing, you recently commented that “In future perhaps journals will require all data to be posted as a condition of publication and then this sort of thing won’t happen anymore.” We went a step further. We require public data sharing at submission. This means that from the moment one submits, […] The post We start by talking reproducible research, then we drift to a discussion…

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Tips when conveying your research to policymakers and the news media

November 17, 2017
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Following up on a conversation regarding publicizing scientific research, Jim Savage wrote: Here’s a report that we produced a few years ago on prioritising potential policy levers to address the structural budget deficit in Australia. In the report we hid all the statistical analysis, aiming at an audience that would feel comfortable reading a broadsheet […] The post Tips when conveying your research to policymakers and the news media appeared…

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Fitting multilevel models when predictors and group effects correlate

November 12, 2017
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Ryan Bain writes: I came across your ‘Fitting Multilevel Models When Predictors and Group Effects Correlate‘ paper that you co-authored with Dr. Bafumi and read it with great interest. I am a current postgraduate student at the University of Glasgow writing a dissertation examining explanations of Euroscepticism at the individual and country level since the […] The post Fitting multilevel models when predictors and group effects correlate appeared first on…

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“A mixed economy is not an economic abomination or even a regrettably unavoidable political necessity but a natural absorbing state,” and other notes on “Whither Science?” by Danko Antolovic

November 9, 2017
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So. I got this email one day, promoting a book that came with the following blurb: Whither Science?, by Danko Antolovic, is a series of essays that explore some of the questions facing modern science. A short read at only 41 pages, Whither Science? looks into the fundamental questions about the purposes, practices and future […] The post “A mixed economy is not an economic abomination or even a regrettably…

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Using D&D to reduce ethnic prejudice

November 8, 2017
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OK, not quite D&D—I just wrote that to get Bob’s attention. It is a role-playing game, though! Here’s the paper, “Seeing the World Through the Other’s Eye: An Online Intervention Reducing Ethnic Prejudice,” by Gabor Simonovits, Gabor Kezdi, and Peter Kardos: We report the results of an intervention that targeted anti-Roma sentiment in Hungary using […] The post Using D&D to reduce ethnic prejudice appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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The time reversal heuristic (priming and voting edition)

November 4, 2017
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Ed Yong writes: Over the past decade, social psychologists have dazzled us with studies showing that huge social problems can seemingly be rectified through simple tricks. A small grammatical tweak in a survey delivered to people the day before an election greatly increases voter turnout. A 15-minute writing exercise narrows the achievement gap between black […] The post The time reversal heuristic (priming and voting edition) appeared first on Statistical…

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Pseudoscience and the left/right whiplash

November 3, 2017
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Pseudoscience and the left/right whiplash

I came across this post by blogger Echidne slamming psychology professor Roy Baumeister. I’d first heard about the Baumeister in the context of his seeming inability to handle scientific criticism. I hadn’t realized that Baumeister had a sideline in pseudoscientific anti-political-correctness. One aspect of all this that interests me is the way that Baumeister, and […] The post Pseudoscience and the left/right whiplash appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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