Posts Tagged ‘ teaching ’

Some natural solutions to the p-value communication problem—and why they won’t work

March 21, 2017
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Blake McShane and David Gal recently wrote two articles (“Blinding us to the obvious? The effect of statistical training on the evaluation of evidence” and “Statistical significance and the dichotomization of evidence”) on the misunderstandings of p-values that are common even among supposed experts in statistics and applied social research. The key misconception has nothing […] The post Some natural solutions to the p-value communication problem—and why they won’t work…

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Ensemble Methods are Doomed to Fail in High Dimensions

March 15, 2017
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Ensemble Methods are Doomed to Fail in High Dimensions

Ensemble methods By ensemble methods, I (Bob, not Andrew) mean approaches that scatter points in parameter space and then make moves by inteprolating or extrapolating among subsets of them. Two prominent examples are: Ter Braak’s differential evolution   Goodman and Weare’s walkers There are extensions and computer implementations of these algorithms. For example, the Python […] The post Ensemble Methods are Doomed to Fail in High Dimensions appeared first on…

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Follow-up forecasting forum in Eindhoven

March 7, 2017
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Follow-up forecasting forum in Eindhoven

Last October I gave a 3-day masterclass on “Forecasting with R” in Eindhoven, Netherlands. There is a follow-up event planned for Tuesday 18 April 2017. It is particularly designed for people who attended the 3-day class, but if anyone else wants to attend they would be welcome. Please register here if you want to attend. The preliminary […]

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How to interpret confidence intervals?

March 4, 2017
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Jason Yamada-Hanff writes: I’m a Neuroscience PhD reforming my statistics education. I am a little confused about how you treat confidence intervals in the book and was hoping you could clear things up for me. Through your blog, I found Richard Morey’s paper (and further readings) about confidence interval interpretations. If I understand correctly, the […] The post How to interpret confidence intervals? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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I’m Niall Ferguson without the money

February 27, 2017
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I’m Niall Ferguson without the money

Somehow I agreed or volunteered to give 6 talks on different topics to different audiences during a two-week period. Maybe I need to use Google calendar with some sort of spacing feature. Giving talks is fun, and it’s a public service, but this...

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Improv

February 25, 2017
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I like this new thing of lecturing improv. I feel that it helps the audience stay focused, as they have to keep the structure of the talk in their heads while it’s happening. Also it enforces more logic in my own presentation, as I’m continually looping back to remind myself and the audience how each […] The post Improv appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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He wants to know what book to read to learn statistics

February 24, 2017
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Tim Gilmour writes: I’m an early 40s guy in Los Angeles, and I’m sort of sending myself back to school, specifically in statistics — not taking classes, just working through things on my own. Though I haven’t really used math much since undergrad, a number of my personal interests (primarily epistemology) would be much better […] The post He wants to know what book to read to learn statistics appeared…

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ComSciCon: Science Communication Workshop for Graduate Students

February 19, 2017
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Nathan Sanders writes: A few years ago, you were kind enough to post a notice on your blog about our science communication conference by grad students, for grad students (ComSciCon). I thought I’d let you know that our program has been going strong and growing, and we’re excited to have opened our application for the […] The post ComSciCon: Science Communication Workshop for Graduate Students appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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Educating the heart with maths and statistics

February 14, 2017
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Educating the heart with maths and statistics

What has love got to do with maths? This morning at the Twitter chat for teachers, (#bfc630nz) the discussion question was, How and what will you teach your students about life this year? As I lurked I was impressed at … Continue reading →

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Aaron Kaufman reviews Luke Heaton’s “A Brief History of Mathematical Thought”

February 12, 2017
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I got this book in the mail. It looked cool but I didn’t feel I had time to read it. A few decades ago I read this wonderful book by Morris Kline, “Mathematics: The Loss of Certainty,” so I figured I’d have a sense of what most of Heaton’s new book would cover. I would’ve […] The post Aaron Kaufman reviews Luke Heaton’s “A Brief History of Mathematical Thought” appeared…

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