Posts Tagged ‘ teaching ’

Bad Numbers: Media-savvy Ivy League prof publishes textbook with a corrupted dataset

June 26, 2017
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Bad Numbers:  Media-savvy Ivy League prof publishes textbook with a corrupted dataset

[cat picture] I might not have noticed this one, except that it happened to involve Congressional elections, and this is an area I know something about. The story goes like this. I’m working to finish up Regression and Other Stories, going through the examples. There’s one where we fit a model to predict the 1988 […] The post Bad Numbers: Media-savvy Ivy League prof publishes textbook with a corrupted dataset…

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Kaiser Fung’s data analysis bootcamp

June 13, 2017
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Kaiser Fung announces a new educational venture he’s created, a bootcamp (12-week full-time in-person program with a curriculum) of short courses with a goal of getting people their first job in an analytics role for a business unit (not engineering or software development, so he is not competing directly with MS Data Science or data […] The post Kaiser Fung’s data analysis bootcamp appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Hey—here are some tips on communicating data and statistics!

June 2, 2017
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This fall I’ll be again teaching the course, Communicating Data and Statistics. Here’s the rough course plan. I’ll tinker with it between now and September but this is the basic idea. (The course listing is here, but that online description is out of date; the course plan linked above is more accurate.) Here are the […] The post Hey—here are some tips on communicating data and statistics! appeared first on…

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Taking Data Journalism Seriously

May 16, 2017
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This is a bit of a followup to our recent review of “Everybody Lies.” While writing the review I searched the blog for mentions of Seth Stephens-Davidowitz, and I came across this post from last year, concerning a claim made by author J. D. Vance that “the middle part of America is more religious than […] The post Taking Data Journalism Seriously appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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Should computer programming be a prerequisite for learning statistics?

May 14, 2017
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[cat picture] This came up in a recent discussion thread, I can’t remember exactly where. A commenter pointed out, correctly, that you shouldn’t require computer programming as a prerequisite for a statistics course: there’s lots in statistics that can be learned without knowing how to program. Sure, if you can program you can do a […] The post Should computer programming be a prerequisite for learning statistics? appeared first on…

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“P-hacking” and the intention-to-cheat effect

May 10, 2017
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I’m a big fan of the work of Uri Simonsohn and his collaborators, but I don’t like the term “p-hacking” because it can be taken to imply an intention to cheat. The image of p-hacking is of a researcher trying test after test on the data until reaching the magic “p less than .05.” But, […] The post “P-hacking” and the intention-to-cheat effect appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Stan without frontiers, Bayes without tears

April 24, 2017
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[cat picture] This recent comment thread reminds me of a question that comes up from time to time, which is how to teach Bayesian statistics to students who aren’t comfortable with calculus. For continuous models, probabilities are integrals. And in just about every example except the one at 47:16 of this video, there are multiple […] The post Stan without frontiers, Bayes without tears appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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Graphs – beauty and truth

April 23, 2017
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Graphs – beauty and truth

Graphs – beauty and truth (with apologies to Keats) A good graph is elegant I really like graphs. I like the way graphs turn numbers into pictures. A good graph is elegant. It uses a few well-placed lines to communicate … Continue reading →

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Teaching Statistics: A Bag of Tricks (second edition)

April 20, 2017
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Teaching Statistics:  A Bag of Tricks (second edition)

Hey! Deb Nolan and I finished the second edition of our book, Teaching Statistics: A Bag of Tricks. You can pre-order it here. I love love love this book. As William Goldman would say, it’s the “good parts version”: all the fun stuff without the standard boring examples (counting colors of M&M’s, etc.). Great stuff […] The post Teaching Statistics: A Bag of Tricks (second edition) appeared first on Statistical…

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In Praise of T.A.s

April 18, 2017
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In Praise of T.A.s

With another teaching term completed, I'm reminded of how much we faculty members rely on our Teaching Assistants (T.A.s) This is especially true in the case of large undergraduate classes, where we'd be run off our feet without the invaluable input fr...

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