Posts Tagged ‘ teaching ’

Damn, I was off by a factor of 2!

December 16, 2014
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I hate when that happens. Demography is tricky. Oh well, as they say in astronomy, who cares, it was less than an order of magnitude! The post Damn, I was off by a factor of 2! appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Scien...

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The latest episode in my continuing effort to use non-sports analogies

December 14, 2014
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In a unit about the law of large numbers, sample size, and margins of error, I used the notorious beauty, sex, and power example: A researcher, working with a sample of size 3000, found that the children of beautiful parents were more likely to be girls, compared to the children of less-attractive parents. Can such […] The post The latest episode in my continuing effort to use non-sports analogies appeared…

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I like the clever way they tell the story. It’s a straightforward series of graphs but the reader has to figure out where to click and what to do, which makes the experience feel more like a voyage of discovery.

December 14, 2014
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I like the clever way they tell the story.  It’s a straightforward series of graphs but the reader has to figure out where to click and what to do, which makes the experience feel more like a voyage of discovery.

Jonathan Falk asks what I think of this animated slideshow by Matthew Klein on “How Americans Die”: Please click on the above to see the actual slideshow, as this static image does not do it justice. What do I think? Here was my reaction: It is good, but I was thrown off by the very […] The post I like the clever way they tell the story. It’s a straightforward…

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How to read (in quantitative social science). And by implication, how to write.

December 2, 2014
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How to read (in quantitative social science).  And by implication, how to write.

It all started when I was reading Chris Blattman’s blog and noticed this: One of the most provocative and interesting field experiments I [Blattman] have seen in this year: Poor people often do not make investments, even when returns are high. One possible explanation is that they have low aspirations and form mental models of […] The post How to read (in quantitative social science). And by implication, how to…

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Students don’t know what’s best for their own learning

December 2, 2014
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[This post is by Aki] This is my first blog posting. Arthur Poropat at Griffith University has a great posting Students don’t know what’s best for their own learning about two recent studies which came to the same conclusion: university students evaluate their teachers more positively when they learn less. My favorite part is That is why many […] The post Students don’t know what’s best for their own learning appeared first on…

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Quick tips on giving research presentations

December 1, 2014
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Hi, I’m writing this so I can refer to it when covering “giving a presentation” in my statistical communication class. The general idea is for me to spend less time in class talking and more time helping out students with their ideas. So, if I have any general advice on presentations, let me give it […] The post Quick tips on giving research presentations appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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Leif and Uri need to hang out with a better class of statisticians

November 26, 2014
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Noted psychology researchers and methods skeptics Leif Nelson and Uri Simonsohn write: A recent Psych Science (.pdf) paper found that sports teams can perform worse when they have too much talent. For example, in Study 3 they found that NBA teams with a higher percentage of talented players win more games, but that teams with […] The post Leif and Uri need to hang out with a better class of…

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I (almost and inadvertently) followed Dan Kahan’s principles in my class today, and that was a good thing (would’ve even been more of a good thing had I realized what I was doing and done it better, but I think I will do better in the future, which has already happened by the time you read this; remember, the blog is on a nearly 2-month lag)

November 25, 2014
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As you might recall, the Elizabeth K. Dollard Professor says that to explain a concept to an unbeliever, explain it conditionally. For example, if you want to talk evolution with a religious fundamentalist, don’t try to convince him or her that evolution is true; instead preface each explanation with, “According to the theory of evolution […] The post I (almost and inadvertently) followed Dan Kahan’s principles in my class today,…

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Princeton Abandons Grade Deflation Plan . . .

November 23, 2014
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Princeton Abandons Grade Deflation Plan . . .

. . . and Kaiser Fung is unhappy. In a post entitled, “Princeton’s loss of nerve,” Kaiser writes: This development is highly regrettable, and a failure of leadership. (The new policy leaves it to individual departments to do whatever they want.) The recent Alumni publication has two articles about this topic, one penned by President […] The post Princeton Abandons Grade Deflation Plan . . . appeared first on Statistical…

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Nominal, Ordinal, Interval, Schmordinal

November 18, 2014
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Nominal, Ordinal, Interval, Schmordinal

Everyone wants to learn about ordinal data! I have a video channel with about 40 videos about statistics, and I love watching to see which videos are getting the most viewing each day. As the Fall term has recently started … Continue reading →

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