Posts Tagged ‘ teaching ’

What they’re saying about “blended learning”: “Perhaps the most reasonable explanation is that no one watched the video or did the textbook reading . . .”

June 25, 2016
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What they’re saying about “blended learning”:  “Perhaps the most reasonable explanation is that no one watched the video or did the textbook reading . . .”

Someone writes in: I was wondering if you had a chance to see the commentary by the Stockwells on blended learning strategies that was recently published in Cell and which also received quite a nice write up by Columbia. It’s also currently featured on Columbia’s webpage. In fact, I was a student in Prof. Stockwell’s […] The post What they’re saying about “blended learning”: “Perhaps the most reasonable explanation is…

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Teaching sampling with dragon data cards

June 23, 2016
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Teaching sampling with dragon data cards

Data cards for teaching statistics Data cards are a wonderful way for students to get a feel for data. As a University lecturer in the 1990s, I found that students often didn’t understand about the multivariate nature of data. This … Continue reading →

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Changing everything at once: Student-centered learning, computerized practice exercises, evaluation of student progress, and a modern syllabus to create a completely new introductory statistics course

June 6, 2016
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I’m speaking at the Electronic Conference on Teaching Statistics on Mon 16 May at 11am. I’ve given many remote talks but this is the first time I’ve spoken at an all-electronic conference. It will be a challenge. In a live talk, everyone’s just sitting in the room staring at you, but in an electronic conference […] The post Changing everything at once: Student-centered learning, computerized practice exercises, evaluation of student…

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Who falls for the education reform hype?

June 3, 2016
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Phillip Middleton writes: My wife is a 5th grade teacher, in Texas, in a title I school (free lunch, other subsidies, poor and emotionally disturbed kids, CPS cases, you name it) on the west side of San Antonio. There are a number of things I’ve been exposed to as a result, the net of which […] The post Who falls for the education reform hype? appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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All that really important statistics stuff that isn’t in the statistics textbooks

May 30, 2016
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All that really important statistics stuff that isn’t in the statistics textbooks

Kaiser writes: More on that work on age adjustment. I keep asking myself where is it in the Stats curriculum do we teach students this stuff? A class session focused on that analysis teaches students so much more about statistical thinking than anything we have in the textbooks. I’m not sure. This sort of analysis […] The post All that really important statistics stuff that isn’t in the statistics textbooks…

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Should he major in political science and minor in statistics or the other way around?

May 29, 2016
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Andrew Wheeler writes: I will be a freshman at the University of Florida this upcoming fall and I am interested in becoming a political pollster. My original question was whether I should major in political science and minor in statistics or the other way around, but any other general advice would be appreciated. My reply: […] The post Should he major in political science and minor in statistics or the…

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The difference between “significant” and “not significant” is not itself statistically significant: Education edition

May 25, 2016
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The difference between “significant” and “not significant” is not itself statistically significant:  Education edition

In a news article entitled “Why smart kids shouldn’t use laptops in class,” Jeff Guo writes: For the past 15 years, educators have debated, exhaustively, the perils of laptops in the lecture hall. . . . Now there is an answer, thanks to a big, new experiment from economists at West Point, who randomly banned […] The post The difference between “significant” and “not significant” is not itself statistically significant:…

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Beautiful Graphs for Baseball Strike-Count Performance

May 16, 2016
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Beautiful Graphs for Baseball Strike-Count Performance

This post is by Bob. I have no idea what Andrew will make of these graphs; I’ve been hoping to gather enough comments from him to code up a ggplot theme. Shravan, you can move along, there’s nothing here but baseball. Jim Albert created some great graphs for strike-count performance in a series of two […] The post Beautiful Graphs for Baseball Strike-Count Performance appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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Happy talk, meet the Edlin factor

May 12, 2016
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Mark Palko points us to this op-ed in which psychiatrist Richard Friedman writes: There are also easy and powerful ways to enhance learning in young people. For example, there is intriguing evidence that the attitude that young people have about their own intelligence — and what their teachers believe — can have a big impact […] The post Happy talk, meet the Edlin factor appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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A new idea for a science core course based entirely on computer simulation

April 21, 2016
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I happen to come across this post from 2011 that I like so much, I thought I’d say it again: Columbia College has for many years had a Core Curriculum, in which students read classics such as Plato (in translation) etc. A few years ago they created a Science core course. There was always some […] The post A new idea for a science core course based entirely on computer…

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