Posts Tagged ‘ teaching ’

Also holding back progress are those who make mistakes and then label correct arguments as “nonsensical.”

August 16, 2017
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Here’s James Heckman in 2013: Also holding back progress are those who claim that Perry and ABC are experiments with samples too small to accurately predict widespread impact and return on investment. This is a nonsensical argument. Their relatively small sample sizes actually speak for — not against — the strength of their findings. Dramatic […] The post Also holding back progress are those who make mistakes and then label…

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What readings should be included in a seminar on the philosophy of statistics, the replication crisis, causation, etc.?

August 7, 2017
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André Ariew writes: I’m a philosopher of science at the University of Missouri. I’m interested in leading a seminar on a variety of current topics with philosophical value, including problems with significance tests, the replication crisis, causation, correlation, randomized trials, etc. I’m hoping that you can point me in a good direction for accessible readings […] The post What readings should be included in a seminar on the philosophy of…

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It’s hard to know what to say about an observational comparison that doesn’t control for key differences between treatment and control groups, chili pepper edition

August 3, 2017
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Jonathan Falk points to this article and writes: Thoughts? I would have liked to have seen the data matched on age, rather than simply using age in a Cox regression, since I suspect that’s what really going on here. The non-chili eaters were much older, and I suspect that the failure to interact age, or […] The post It’s hard to know what to say about an observational comparison that…

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Seemingly intuitive and low math intros to Bayes never seem to deliver as hoped: Why?

August 2, 2017
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This post was prompted by recent nicely done videos by Rasmus Baath that provide an intuitive and low math introduction to Bayesian material. Now, I do not know that these have delivered less than he hoped for. Nor I have asked him. However, given similar material I and others have tried out in the past that […] The post Seemingly intuitive and low math intros to Bayes never seem to deliver…

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Giving feedback indirectly by invoking a hypothetical reviewer

August 2, 2017
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Ethan Bolker points us to this discussion on “How can I avoid being “the negative one” when giving feedback on statistics?”, which begins: Results get sent around a group of biological collaborators for feedback. Comments come back from the senior members of the group about the implications of the results, possible extensions, etc. I look […] The post Giving feedback indirectly by invoking a hypothetical reviewer appeared first on Statistical…

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My August Reading List

July 31, 2017
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My August Reading List

Here are some suggestions for you:Calzolari, G., 2017. Econometrics exams and round numbers: Use or misuse of indirect estimation methods? Communications in Statistics - Simulation and Computation, in press.Chakraborti, S., F. Jardim, & E. Epprecht...

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Dragon Trainer rich mathematical task

July 20, 2017
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Dragon Trainer rich mathematical task

I love rich mathematical tasks. Here is one for all levels of schooling. What do you think? Background to rich tasks A rich task is an open-ended task that students can engage with at multiple levels. I use the following … Continue reading →

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Animating a spinner using ggplot2 and ImageMagick

July 18, 2017
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Animating a spinner using ggplot2 and ImageMagick

It’s Sunday, and I [Bob] am just sitting on the couch peacefully ggplotting to illustrate basic sample spaces using spinners (a trick I’m borrowing from Jim Albert’s book Curve Ball). There’s an underlying continuous outcome (i.e., where the spinner lands) and a quantization into a number of regions to produce a discrete outcome (e.g., “success” […] The post Animating a spinner using ggplot2 and ImageMagick appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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Mathematics and statistics lessons about elections

July 13, 2017
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Mathematics and statistics lessons about elections

Study elections in mathematics because it is important Too often mathematics is seen as pure and apolitical.  Maths teachers may keep away from concepts that seem messy and without right and wrong answers. However, teachers of mathematics and statistics have … Continue reading →

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No, I’m not blocking you or deleting your comments!

July 1, 2017
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Someone wrote in: I am worried you may have blocked me from commenting on your blog (because a couple of comments I made aren’t there). . . . Or maybe I failed to post correctly or maybe you just didn’t think my comments were interesting enough. . . . This comes up from time to […] The post No, I’m not blocking you or deleting your comments! appeared first on…

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