Posts Tagged ‘ teaching ’

The Class-size debate – it matters to teachers

January 16, 2017
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The Class-size debate – it matters to teachers

Class size matters to teachers Class size is a perennial question in education. What is the ideal size for a school class? Teachers would like smaller classes, to improve learning. There is evidence of a small positive effect size due … Continue reading →

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Why people hate statistics

January 10, 2017
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Why people hate statistics

This summer/Christmas break it has been my pleasure to help a young woman who is struggling with statistics, and it has prompted me to ask people who teach postgraduate statistical methods – WTF are you doing? Louise (name changed) is a … Continue reading →

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We fiddle while Rome burns: p-value edition

January 7, 2017
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We fiddle while Rome burns:  p-value edition

Raghu Parthasarathy presents a wonderfully clear example of disastrous p-value-based reasoning that he saw in a conference presentation. Here’s Raghu: Consider, for example, some tumorous cells that we can treat with drugs 1 and 2, either alone or in combination. We can make measurements of growth under our various drug treatment conditions. Suppose our measurements […] The post We fiddle while Rome burns: p-value edition appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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Two unrelated topics in one post: (1) Teaching useful algebra classes, and (2) doing more careful psychological measurements

December 30, 2016
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Kevin Lewis and Paul Alper send me so much material, I think they need their own blogs. In the meantime, I keep posting the stuff they send me, as part of my desperate effort to empty my inbox. 1. From Lewis: “Should Students Assessed as Needing Remedial Mathematics Take College-Level Quantitative Courses Instead? A Randomized […] The post Two unrelated topics in one post: (1) Teaching useful algebra classes, and…

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Hark, hark! the p-value at heaven’s gate sings

December 16, 2016
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Hark, hark! the p-value at heaven’s gate sings

Three different people pointed me to this post, in which food researcher and business school professor Brian Wansink advises Ph.D. students to “never say no”: When a research idea comes up, check it out, put some time into it and you might get some success. I like that advice and I agree with it. Or, […] The post Hark, hark! the p-value at heaven’s gate sings appeared first on Statistical…

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Avoiding only the shadow knowing the motivating problem of a post.

December 12, 2016
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Avoiding only the shadow knowing the motivating problem of a post.

Graphic From Given I am starting to make some posts to this blog (again) I was pleased to run across a youtube of Xiao-Li Meng being interviewed on the same topic by Suzanne Smith the Director of the Center for Writing and Communicating Ideas. One thing I picked up was to make the problem being addressed […] The post Avoiding only the shadow knowing the motivating problem of a post. appeared…

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Has the Numeracy Project failed?

December 11, 2016
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Has the Numeracy Project failed?

The Numeracy Development Project has influenced the teaching of mathematics in New Zealand. It has changed the language people use to talk about mathematical understanding, introducing the terms “multiplicative thinking”, “part-whole” and “proportional reasoning” to the teacher toolkit. It has … Continue reading →

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“Dear Major Textbook Publisher”: A Rant

December 7, 2016
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“Dear Major Textbook Publisher”:  A Rant

Dear Major Academic Publisher, You just sent me, unsolicited, an introductory statistics textbook that is 800 pages and weighs about 5 pounds. It’s the 3rd edition of a book by someone I’ve never heard of. That’s fine—a newcomer can write a good book. The real problem is that the book is crap. It’s just the […] The post “Dear Major Textbook Publisher”: A Rant appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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Mathematics activities using Lego bricks

November 27, 2016
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Mathematics activities using Lego bricks

I love Lego. And I love making up mathematics and statistics activities for people of all levels of attainment. So it makes sense that I would make up maths discussion activities using Lego. Whenever I have posted my ideas on … Continue reading →

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Stan Webinar, Stan Classes, and StanCon

November 14, 2016
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This post is by Eric. We have a number of Stan related events in the pipeline. On 22 Nov, Ben Goodrich and I will be holding a free webinar called Introduction to Bayesian Computation Using the rstanarm R Package. Here is the abstract: The goal of the rstanarm package is to make it easier to use Bayesian […] The post Stan Webinar, Stan Classes, and StanCon appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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