Posts Tagged ‘ teaching ’

“A small but growing collection of studies suggest X” . . . huh?

February 24, 2015
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Lee Beck writes: I’m curious if you have any thoughts on the statistical meaning of sentences like “a small but growing collection of studies suggest [X].” That exact wording comes from this piece in the New Yorker, but I think it’s the sort of expression you often see in science journalism (“small but mounting”, “small […] The post “A small but growing collection of studies suggest X” . . .…

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“Academics should be made accountable for exaggerations in press releases about their own work”

February 22, 2015
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Fernando Martel Garcia points me to this news article by Ben Goldacre: For anyone with medical training, mainstream media coverage of science can be an uncomfortable read. It is common to find correlational findings misrepresented as denoting causation, for example, or findings in animal studies confidently exaggerated to make claims about treatment for humans. But […] The post “Academics should be made accountable for exaggerations in press releases about their…

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Statistical Significance – Significant Problem?

February 20, 2015
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John Carlin, who’s collaborated on some of my recent work on Type S and Type M errors, prepared this presentation for a clinical audience. It might be of interest to some of you. The ideas and some of the examples should be familiar to regular readers of this blog, but it could be useful to […] The post Statistical Significance – Significant Problem? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Heroic Econometrics Teachers: Tom Rothenberg and Dennis Sargan

February 16, 2015
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I'm not sure why this popped into my head just now. There have been many fine graduate econometrics teachers/mentors; their armies of well-trained students now populate top universities.  But two seem to me to have transcended the rest, achieving ...

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“Peer assessment enhances student learning”

February 15, 2015
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Dennis Sun, Naftali Harris, Guenther Walther, and Michael Baiocchi write: Peer assessment has received attention lately as a way of providing personalized feedback that scales to large classes. . . . By conducting a randomized controlled trial in an introductory statistics class, we provide evidence that peer assessment causes significant gains in student achievement. The […] The post “Peer assessment enhances student learning” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Discussion with Steven Pinker connecting cognitive psychology research to the difficulties of writing

February 9, 2015
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Following up on my discussion of Steven Pinker’s writing advice, Pinker and I had an email exchange that cleared up some issues and raised some new ones. In particular, Pinker made a connection between the difficulty of writing and some research findings in cognitive psychology. I think this connection is really cool—I’ve been thinking and […] The post Discussion with Steven Pinker connecting cognitive psychology research to the difficulties of…

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Why I keep talking about “generalizing from sample to population”

February 5, 2015
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Someone publishes some claim, some statistical comparison with “p less than .05″ attached to it. My response is: OK, you see this pattern in the sample. Do you think it holds in the population? Why do I ask this? Why don’t I ask the more standard question: Do you really think this result is statistically […] The post Why I keep talking about “generalizing from sample to population” appeared first…

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Don’t teach significance testing – Guest post

February 2, 2015
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Don’t teach significance testing – Guest post

The following is a guest post by Tony Hak of Rotterdam School of Management. I know Tony would love some discussion about it in the comments. I remain undecided either way, so would like to hear arguments. GOOD REASONS FOR NOT TEACHING … Continue reading →

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Documenting a class-participation activity

January 31, 2015
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Documenting a class-participation activity

Tian Zheng implemented my candies demo using Legos: Also lots of details on the results. The point here is not exactly what happened (but, yes, the demo did work) but rather the idea that you can use photos and graphs to document what worked in class. We should be able to do this sort of […] The post Documenting a class-participation activity appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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Six quick tips to improve your regression modeling

January 29, 2015
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It’s Appendix A of ARM: A.1. Fit many models Think of a series of models, starting with the too-simple and continuing through to the hopelessly messy. Generally it’s a good idea to start simple. Or start complex if you’d like, but prepare to quickly drop things out and move to the simpler model to help […] The post Six quick tips to improve your regression modeling appeared first on Statistical…

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