Posts Tagged ‘ Causal Inference ’

Workshop on The Regression Discontinuity Design

April 18, 2017
By
Workshop on The Regression Discontinuity Design

As part of our bid to get an MRC grant (which we managed to do), we promised that, if successful, we'd also have a dissemination workshop, at the end of the project. Well, the project on the Regression Discontinuity Design (RDD) has now finished f...

Read more »

Causal inference conference in North Carolina

April 15, 2017
By
Causal inference conference in North Carolina

Michael Hudgens announces: Registration for the 2017 Atlantic Causal Inference Conference is now open. The registration site is here. More information about the conference, including the poster session and the Second Annual Causal Inference Data Analysis Challenge can be found on the conference website here. We held the very first Atlantic Causal Inference Conference here at Columbia […] The post Causal inference conference in North Carolina appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

Read more »

Causal inference conference at Columbia University on Sat 6 May: Varying Treatment Effects

April 14, 2017
By
Causal inference conference at Columbia University on Sat 6 May:  Varying Treatment Effects

Hey! We’re throwing a conference: Varying Treatment Effects The literature on causal inference focuses on estimating average effects, but the very notion of an “average effect” acknowledges variation. Relevant buzzwords are treatment interactions, situational effects, and personalized medicine. In this one-day conference we shall focus on varying effects in social science and policy research, with […] The post Causal inference conference at Columbia University on Sat 6 May: Varying Treatment…

Read more »

Let’s accept the idea that treatment effects vary—not as something special but just as a matter of course

March 25, 2017
By
Let’s accept the idea that treatment effects vary—not as something special but just as a matter of course

Tyler Cowen writes: Does knowing the price lower your enjoyment of goods and services? I [Cowen] don’t quite agree with this as stated, as the experience of enjoying a bargain can make it more pleasurable, or at least I have seen this for many people. Some in fact enjoy the bargain only, not the actual […] The post Let’s accept the idea that treatment effects vary—not as something special but…

Read more »

This could be a big deal: the overuse of psychotropic medications for advanced Alzheimer’s patients

March 22, 2017
By

I received the following email, entitled “A research lead (potentially bigger than the opioid epidemic,” from someone who wishes to remain anonymous: My research lead is related to the use of psychotropic medications in Alzheimer’s patients. I should note that strong cautions have already been issued with respect to the use of these medications in […] The post This could be a big deal: the overuse of psychotropic medications for…

Read more »

Applying statistics in science will likely remain unreasonably difficult in my life time: but I have no intention of changing careers.

March 8, 2017
By
Applying statistics in science will likely remain unreasonably difficult in my life time: but I have no intention of changing careers.

This post is by Keith.   (Image from deviantart.com) There are a couple posts I have been struggling to put together, one is on what science is or should be (drawing on Charles Peirce). The other is on why a posterior is not a posterior is not a posterior: even if mathematically equivalent – they are […] The post Applying statistics in science will likely remain unreasonably difficult in my life…

Read more »

How to do a descriptive analysis using regression modeling?

March 7, 2017
By

Freddy Garcia writes: I read your post Vine regression?, and your phrase “I love descriptive data analysis!” make me wonder: How to do a descriptive analysis using regression models? Maybe my question could be misleading to an statistician, but I am a economics student. So we are accustomed to think in causal terms when we […] The post How to do a descriptive analysis using regression modeling? appeared first on…

Read more »

Is Rigor Contagious? (my talk next Monday 4:15pm at Columbia)

February 24, 2017
By

Is Rigor Contagious? Much of the theory and practice of statistics and econometrics is characterized by a toxic mixture of rigor and sloppiness. Methods are justified based on seemingly pure principles that can’t survive reality. Examples of these principles include random sampling, unbiased estimation, hypothesis testing, Bayesian inference, and causal identification. Examples of uncomfortable reality […] The post Is Rigor Contagious? (my talk next Monday 4:15pm at Columbia) appeared first…

Read more »

Cloak and dagger

February 22, 2017
By
Cloak and dagger

Elan B. writes: I saw this JAMA Pediatrics article [by Julia Raifman, Ellen Moscoe, and S. Bryn Austin] getting a lot of press for claiming that LGBT suicide attempts went down 14% after gay marriage was legalized. The heart of the study is comparing suicide attempt rates (in last 12 months) before and after exposure — gay marriage legalization […] The post Cloak and dagger appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

Read more »

Cloak and dagger

February 22, 2017
By
Cloak and dagger

Elan B. writes: I saw this JAMA Pediatrics article [by Julia Raifman, Ellen Moscoe, and S. Bryn Austin] getting a lot of press for claiming that LGBT suicide attempts went down 14% after gay marriage was legalized. The heart of the study is comparing suicide attempt rates (in last 12 months) before and after exposure — gay marriage legalization […] The post Cloak and dagger appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

Read more »


Subscribe

Email:

  Subscribe