Posts Tagged ‘ Causal Inference ’

One-day workshop on causal inference (NYC, Sat. 16 July)

July 15, 2016
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James Savage is teaching a one-day workshop on causal inference this coming Saturday (16 July) in New York using RStanArm. Here’s a link to the details: One-day workshop on causal inference Here’s the course outline: How do prices affect sales? What is the uplift from a marketing decision? By how much will studying for an […] The post One-day workshop on causal inference (NYC, Sat. 16 July) appeared first on…

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About that claim that police are less likely to shoot blacks than whites

July 14, 2016
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About that claim that police are less likely to shoot blacks than whites

Josh Miller writes: Did you see this splashy NYT headline, “Surprising New Evidence Shows Bias in Police Use of Force but Not in Shootings”? It’s actually looks like a cool study overall, with granular data, and a ton of leg work, and rich set of results that extend beyond the attention grabbing headline that is […] The post About that claim that police are less likely to shoot blacks than…

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Causal and predictive inference in policy research

July 9, 2016
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Todd Rogers pointed me to a paper by Jon Kleinberg, Jens Ludwig, Sendhil Mullainathan, and Ziad Obermeyer that begins: Empirical policy research often focuses on causal inference. Since policy choices seem to depend on understanding the counterfactual—what happens with and without a policy—this tight link of causality and policy seems natural. While this link holds […] The post Causal and predictive inference in policy research appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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Causal mediation

July 7, 2016
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Causal mediation

Judea Pearl points me to this discussion with Kosuke Imai at a conference on causal mediation. I continue to think that the most useful way to think about mediation is in terms of a joint or multivariate outcome, and I continue to think that if we want to understand mediation, we need to think about […] The post Causal mediation appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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My week at ISBA

June 17, 2016
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I've spent the last few days in beautiful Sardinia for the ISBA world conference. The place is outstanding, really beautiful, although it's kind of weird that there is no real town along the cost for miles and miles. Leaving Cagliari and driving for ov...

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When doing causal inference, define your treatment decision and then consider the consequences that flow from it

May 26, 2016
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Danielle Fumia writes: I am a research at the Washington State Institute for Public Policy, and I work on research estimating the effect of college attendance on earnings. Many studies that examine the effect of attending college on earnings control for college degree receipt and work experience. These models seem to violate the practice you […] The post When doing causal inference, define your treatment decision and then consider the…

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Bias against women in academia

May 19, 2016
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Bias against women in academia

I’m not the best one to write about this: to the extent that there’s bias in favor of men, I’ve been a beneficiary. Also I’m not familiar with the research on the topic. I know there are some statistical difficulties in setting up these causal questions, comparable to the difficulties arising in using “hedonic regression” […] The post Bias against women in academia appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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The Access to Justice Lab at Harvard Law School: Job Openings!

May 10, 2016
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Jim Greiner writes: The Access to Justice Lab is a startup effort, initially supported by the Laura and John Arnold Foundation with sufficient funds for three years, headed by Jim Greiner at Harvard Law School. The Lab will produce randomized control trials (“RCTs”) directly involving courts and lawyers, particularly in the areas of access to […] The post The Access to Justice Lab at Harvard Law School: Job Openings! appeared…

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The causal inference competition you’ve all been waiting for!

April 21, 2016
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Jennifer Hill announces “the first-ever ACIC causal inference data analysis competition”: Is your SATT where it’s at? Participate by submitting treatment effect estimates across a range of datasets OR by submitting a function (in any of a variety of programming languages) that will take input (covariate, treatment assignment, and response) and generate a treatment effect […] The post The causal inference competition you’ve all been waiting for! appeared first on…

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A short answer to a short question

April 17, 2016
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Emir Efendic writes: What is your opinion and can you think of any critiques of the multiple mediation models by Preacher and Hayes (e.g. Preacher & Hayes, 2008)? What would be your method of choice if you were testing multiple possible mediators of an effect, but also if said mediators are connected in a model […] The post A short answer to a short question appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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