Posts Tagged ‘ Causal Inference ’

“The Internal and External Validity of the Regression Discontinuity Design: A Meta-Analysis of 15 Within-Study-Comparisons”

April 4, 2018
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Jag Bhalla points to this post by Alex Tabarrok pointing to this paper, “The Internal and External Validity of the Regression Discontinuity Design: A Meta-Analysis of 15 Within-Study-Comparisons,” by Duncan Chaplin, Thomas Cook, Jelena Zurovac, Jared Coopersmith, Mariel Finucane, Lauren Vollmer, and Rebecca Morris, which reports that regression discontinuity (RD) estimation performed well in these […] The post “The Internal and External Validity of the Regression Discontinuity Design: A Meta-Analysis…

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Does adding women to corporate boards increase stock price?

April 3, 2018
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Anton Kasster writes: I recently came across a study which I think is quite questionable, even ridiculous. This study is unfortunately quite old (2012), but its conclusions are so ludicrous that the study is perhaps still interesting. The study claims that companies with women in their supervisory boards perform better than companies without a woman […] The post Does adding women to corporate boards increase stock price? appeared first on…

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Bayesian inference for A/B testing: Lauren Kennedy and I speak at the NYC Women in Machine Learning and Data Science meetup tomorrow (Tues 27 Mar) 7pm

March 26, 2018
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Here it is: Bayesian inference for A/B testing Andrew Gelman, Department of Statistics and Department of Political Science, Columbia University Lauren Kennedy, Columbia Population Research Center, Columbia University Suppose we want to use empirical data to compare two or more decisions or treatment options. Classical statistical methods based on statistical significance and p-values break down […] The post Bayesian inference for A/B testing: Lauren Kennedy and I speak at the…

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Debate over claims of importance of spending on Obamacare advertising

March 25, 2018
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Jerrod Anderson points to this post by Paul Shafer, Erika Fowler, Laura Baum, and Sarah Gollust, “Advertising cutbacks reduce Marketplace information-seeking behavior: Lessons from Kentucky for 2018.” Anderson expresses skepticism about this claim. I’ll first summarize the claims of Shafer et al. and then get to Anderson’s criticism. Shafer et al. write: The Trump administration […] The post Debate over claims of importance of spending on Obamacare advertising appeared first…

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The moral hazard of quantitative social science: Causal identification, statistical inference, and policy

March 21, 2018
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The moral hazard of quantitative social science:  Causal identification, statistical inference, and policy

A couple people pointed me to this article, “The Moral Hazard of Lifesaving Innovations: Naloxone Access, Opioid Abuse, and Crime,” by Jennifer Doleac and Anita Mukherjee, which begins: The United States is experiencing an epidemic of opioid abuse. In response, many states have increased access to Naloxone, a drug that can save lives when administered […] The post The moral hazard of quantitative social science: Causal identification, statistical inference, and…

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“and, indeed, that my study is consistent with X having a negative effect on Y.”

March 9, 2018
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David Allison shares this article: Pediatrics: letter to the editor – Metformin for Obesity in Prepubertal and Pubertal Children A Randomized Controlled Trial and the authors’ reply: RE: Clarification of statistical interpretation in metformin trial paper The authors of the original paper were polite in their response, but they didn’t seem to get the point […] The post “and, indeed, that my study is consistent with X having a negative…

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“and, indeed, that my study is consistent with X having a negative effect on Y.”

March 9, 2018
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David Allison shares this article: Pediatrics: letter to the editor – Metformin for Obesity in Prepubertal and Pubertal Children A Randomized Controlled Trial and the authors’ reply: RE: Clarification of statistical interpretation in metformin trial paper The authors of the original paper were polite in their response, but they didn’t seem to get the point […] The post “and, indeed, that my study is consistent with X having a negative…

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“and, indeed, that my study is consistent with X having a negative effect on Y.”

March 9, 2018
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David Allison shares this article: Pediatrics: letter to the editor – Metformin for Obesity in Prepubertal and Pubertal Children A Randomized Controlled Trial and the authors’ reply: RE: Clarification of statistical interpretation in metformin trial paper The authors of the original paper were polite in their response, but they didn’t seem to get the point […] The post “and, indeed, that my study is consistent with X having a negative…

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Bayes for estimating a small effect in the context of large variation

February 28, 2018
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Shira Mitchell and Mariel Finucane, two statisticians at Mathematica Policy Research (that’s the policy-analysis organization, not the Wolfram software company) write: We here at Mathematica have questions about priors for a health policy evaluation. Here’s the setting: In our dataset, healthcare (per person per month) expenditures are highly variable (sd = $2500), but from prior […] The post Bayes for estimating a small effect in the context of large variation…

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I’ll use this line in my talk this Wednesday at the Society for Research on Educational Effectivness

February 27, 2018
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I had a conversation with a policy analyst about the design of studies for program evaluation—the post is scheduled to appear in a few months—and he expressed some frustration: The idea of evidence based policy has put a gun to our heads as researchers to give binary responses with absolute confidence to a question that […] The post I’ll use this line in my talk this Wednesday at the Society…

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