Posts Tagged ‘ Causal Inference ’

My week at ISBA

June 17, 2016
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I've spent the last few days in beautiful Sardinia for the ISBA world conference. The place is outstanding, really beautiful, although it's kind of weird that there is no real town along the cost for miles and miles. Leaving Cagliari and driving for ov...

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When doing causal inference, define your treatment decision and then consider the consequences that flow from it

May 26, 2016
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Danielle Fumia writes: I am a research at the Washington State Institute for Public Policy, and I work on research estimating the effect of college attendance on earnings. Many studies that examine the effect of attending college on earnings control for college degree receipt and work experience. These models seem to violate the practice you […] The post When doing causal inference, define your treatment decision and then consider the…

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Bias against women in academia

May 19, 2016
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Bias against women in academia

I’m not the best one to write about this: to the extent that there’s bias in favor of men, I’ve been a beneficiary. Also I’m not familiar with the research on the topic. I know there are some statistical difficulties in setting up these causal questions, comparable to the difficulties arising in using “hedonic regression” […] The post Bias against women in academia appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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The Access to Justice Lab at Harvard Law School: Job Openings!

May 10, 2016
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Jim Greiner writes: The Access to Justice Lab is a startup effort, initially supported by the Laura and John Arnold Foundation with sufficient funds for three years, headed by Jim Greiner at Harvard Law School. The Lab will produce randomized control trials (“RCTs”) directly involving courts and lawyers, particularly in the areas of access to […] The post The Access to Justice Lab at Harvard Law School: Job Openings! appeared…

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The causal inference competition you’ve all been waiting for!

April 21, 2016
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Jennifer Hill announces “the first-ever ACIC causal inference data analysis competition”: Is your SATT where it’s at? Participate by submitting treatment effect estimates across a range of datasets OR by submitting a function (in any of a variety of programming languages) that will take input (covariate, treatment assignment, and response) and generate a treatment effect […] The post The causal inference competition you’ve all been waiting for! appeared first on…

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A short answer to a short question

April 17, 2016
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Emir Efendic writes: What is your opinion and can you think of any critiques of the multiple mediation models by Preacher and Hayes (e.g. Preacher & Hayes, 2008)? What would be your method of choice if you were testing multiple possible mediators of an effect, but also if said mediators are connected in a model […] The post A short answer to a short question appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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2016 Atlantic Causal Inference Conference

April 12, 2016
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Jennifer Hill writes: Registration for the 2016 Atlantic Causal Inference Conference is now live. Stay tuned for short course registration (free for conference participants) and an announcement regarding a causal inference data analysis competition…both coming soon! Also please consider signing up to give a lightning talk (link on website). The conference will be held 26-27 […] The post 2016 Atlantic Causal Inference Conference appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Postdoc in Alabama on obesity-related research using statistics

April 6, 2016
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David Allison writes: UAB’s Office of Energetics (http://www.soph.uab.edu/energetics/home) seeks a post-doctoral fellow with statistical training for a fellowship in obesity-related research as part of a highly interactive collaborative interdisciplinary team. · Collaborative Style: We are seeking a good-spirited team-player who gets along well with others from diverse intellectual, social, and demographic backgrounds and who enjoys […] The post Postdoc in Alabama on obesity-related research using statistics appeared first on Statistical…

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In the biggest advance in applied mathematics since the most recent theorem that Stephen Wolfram paid for . . .

April 1, 2016
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Seth Green writes: I thought you might enjoy this update from the STATA team: . . . suppose we wish to know the effect on employment status of a job training program. Further suppose that motivation affects employment status and motivation affects participation. We do not observe motivation. We have an endogeneity problem. Stata 14’s […] The post In the biggest advance in applied mathematics since the most recent theorem…

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Numbers too good to be true? Or: Thanks, Obama!?

March 30, 2016
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Numbers too good to be true? Or: Thanks, Obama!?

This post is by Phil. The “Affordable Care Act” a.k.a. “Obamacare” was passed in 2010, with its various pieces coming into play over the following few years. One of those pieces is penalties for hospitals that see high readmission rates. The theory here, or at least one of the theories here, was that hospitals could […] The post Numbers too good to be true? Or: Thanks, Obama!? appeared first on…

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