Posts Tagged ‘ Causal Inference ’

“The Europeans and Australians were too eager to believe in renal denervation”

July 16, 2014
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“The Europeans and Australians were too eager to believe in renal denervation”

As you can see, I’m having a competition with myself for the most boring title ever. The story, though, is not boring. Paul Alper writes: I just came across this in the NYT. Here is the NEJM article itself: And here is the editorial in the NEJM: The gist is that on the basis of […] The post “The Europeans and Australians were too eager to believe in renal denervation”…

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More on those randomistas

June 25, 2014
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Following up on our recent post, I clicked on some of Ziliak’s links and found lots of good stuff, especially the post by Berk Ozler. I have no knowledge of his work but I like his writing; see here, for example. Ziliak replied: Ozler’s post is very good indeed, and well written. Ozler’s suggestion for […] The post More on those randomistas appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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Smullyan and the Randomistas

June 23, 2014
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Smullyan and the Randomistas

Steve Ziliak wrote in: I thought you might be interested in the following exchanges on randomized trials: Here are a few exchanges on the economics and ethics of randomized controlled trials, reacting to my [Zilliak's] study with Edward R. Teather-Posadas, “The Unprincipled Randomization Principle in Economics and Medicine”. Our study is forthcoming in the Oxford […] The post Smullyan and the Randomistas appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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It’s not matching or regression, it’s matching and regression.

June 22, 2014
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A colleague writes: Why do people keep praising matching over regression for being non parametric? Isn’t it f’ing parametric in the matching stage, in effect, given how many types of matching there are… you’re making structural assumptions about how to deal with similarities and differences…. the likelihood two observations are similar based on something quite […] The post It’s not matching or regression, it’s matching and regression. appeared first on…

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Regression and causality and variable ordering

June 8, 2014
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Bill Harris wrote in with a question: David Hogg points out in one of his general articles on data modeling that regression assumptions require one to put the variable with the highest variance in the ‘y’ position and the variable you know best (lowest variance) in the ‘x’ position. As he points out, others speak […] The post Regression and causality and variable ordering appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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A whole fleet of gremlins: Looking more carefully at Richard Tol’s twice-corrected paper, “The Economic Effects of Climate Change”

May 27, 2014
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A whole fleet of gremlins:  Looking more carefully at Richard Tol’s twice-corrected paper, “The Economic Effects of Climate Change”

We had a discussion the other day of a paper, “The Economic Effects of Climate Change,” by economist Richard Tol. The paper came to my attention after I saw a notice from Adam Marcus that it was recently revised because of data errors. But after looking at the paper more carefully, I see a bunch […] The post A whole fleet of gremlins: Looking more carefully at Richard Tol’s twice-corrected…

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How much can we learn about individual-level causal claims from state-level correlations?

May 16, 2014
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How much can we learn about individual-level causal claims from state-level correlations?

Hey, we all know the answer: “correlation does not imply causation”—but of course life is more complicated than that. As philosophers, economists, statisticians, and others have repeatedly noted, most of our information about the world is observational not experimental, yet we manage to draw causal conclusions all the time. Sure, some of these conclusions are […] The post How much can we learn about individual-level causal claims from state-level correlations?…

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Seth Roberts

April 30, 2014
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Seth Roberts

I met Seth back in the early 1990s when we were both professors at the University of California. He sometimes came to the statistics department seminar and we got to talking about various things; in particular we shared an interest in statistical graphics. Much of my work in this direction eventually went toward the use […] The post Seth Roberts appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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Crowdstorming a dataset

April 28, 2014
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Raphael Silberzahn writes: Brian Nosek, Eric Luis Uhlmann, Dan Martin, and I just launched a project through the Open Science Center we think you’ll find interesting. The basic idea is to “Crowdstorm a Dataset”. Multiple independent analysts are recruited to test the same hypothesis on the same data set in whatever manner they see as […] The post Crowdstorming a dataset appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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Big Data…Big Deal? Maybe, if Used with Caution.

April 27, 2014
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This post is by David K. Park As we have witnessed, the term “big data” has been thrusted onto the zeitgeist in the past several years, however, when one pushes beyond the hype, there seems to be little substance there. We’ve always had “data” so what so unique about it this time? Yes, we recognize it’s […] The post Big Data…Big Deal? Maybe, if Used with Caution. appeared first on Statistical…

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