Posts Tagged ‘ Causal Inference ’

Retrospective clinical trials?

November 20, 2014
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Kelvin Leshabari writes: I am a young medical doctor in Africa who wondered if it is possible to have a retrospective designed randomised clinical trial and yet be sound valid in statistical sense. This is because to the best of my knowledge, the assumptions underlying RCT methodology include that data is obtained in a prospective […] The post Retrospective clinical trials? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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Best job ever

November 14, 2014
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Best job ever

The job advert for the postdoc position in our MRC-funded project on the Regression Discontinuity Design is finally out.Aidan has done a fantastic job in his little over a year in the position, but he's now moved to a lectureship in our department...

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The history of MRP highlights some differences between political science and epidemiology

November 11, 2014
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Responding to a comment from Thomas Lumley (who asked why MRP estimates often seem to appear without any standard errors), I wrote: In political science, MRP always seems accompanied by uncertainty estimates. However, when lots of things are being displayed at once, it’s not always easy to show uncertainty, and in many cases I simply […] The post The history of MRP highlights some differences between political science and epidemiology…

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I love it when I can respond to a question with a single link

October 29, 2014
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Shira writes: This came up from trying to help a colleague of mine at Human Rights Watch. He has several completely observed variables X, and a variable with 29% missing, Y. He wants a histogram (and other descriptive statistics) of a “filled in” Y. He can regress Y on X, and impute missing Y’s from […] The post I love it when I can respond to a question with a…

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Why I’m still not persuaded by the claim that subliminal smiley-faces can have big effects on political attitudes

September 23, 2014
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Why I’m still not persuaded by the claim that subliminal smiley-faces can have big effects on political attitudes

We had a discussion last month on the sister blog regarding the effects of subliminal messages on political attitudes.  It started with a Larry Bartels post entitled “Here’s how a cartoon smiley face punched a big hole in democratic theory,” with the subtitle, “Fleeting exposure to ‘irrelevant stimuli’ powerfully shapes our assessments of policy arguments,” discussing the […]

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Estimating discontinuity in slope of a response function

September 20, 2014
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Peter Ganong sends me a new paper (coauthored with Simon Jager) on the “regression kink design.” Ganong writes: The method is a close cousin of regression discontinuity and has gotten a lot of traction recently among economists, with over 20 papers in the past few years, though less among statisticians. We propose a simple placebo […]

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B my J

September 8, 2014
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As part of our work on the Regression Discontinuity Design for the British Journal of Medicine, we decided we should prepare a short, introductory research paper. We weren't holding our breath, as we thought that, while obviously interesting to cl...

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Estimated effect of early childhood intervention downgraded from 42% to 25%

August 8, 2014
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Last year I came across an article, “Labor Market Returns to Early Childhood Stimulation: a 20-year Followup to an Experimental Intervention in Jamaica,” by Paul Gertler, James Heckman, Rodrigo Pinto, Arianna Zanolini, Christel Vermeerch, Susan Walker, Susan M. Chang, and Sally Grantham-McGregor, that claimed that early childhood stimulation raised adult earnings by 42%. At the […] The post Estimated effect of early childhood intervention downgraded from 42% to 25% appeared…

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The health policy innovation center: how best to move from pilot studies to large-scale practice?

July 31, 2014
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A colleague pointed me to this news article regarding evaluation of new health plans: The Affordable Care Act would fund a new research outfit evocatively named the Innovation Center to discover how to most effectively deliver health care, with $10 billion to spend over a decade. But now that the center has gotten started, many […] The post The health policy innovation center: how best to move from pilot studies…

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A linguist has a question about sampling when the goal is causal inference from observational data

July 28, 2014
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Nate Delaney-Busch writes: I’m a PhD student of cognitive neuroscience at Tufts, and a question came recently with my colleagues about the difficulty of random sampling in cases of highly controlled stimulus sets, and I thought I would drop a line to see if you had any reading suggestions for us. Let’s say I wanted […] The post A linguist has a question about sampling when the goal is causal…

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