Posts Tagged ‘ data ’

Another example of misleading time-based correlation

December 15, 2014
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Another example of misleading time-based correlation

On my sister blog last week, I wrote about how to screw up a column chart. The chart designer apparently wanted to explore whether Rotten Tomato Scores are correlated with box office success, and whether the running time of a movie is correlated with box office success. In either case, the set of movies is a small one, those directed by Chris Nolan. Here is a better view of the…

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Three axes or none

December 11, 2014
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Three axes or none

Catching up on some older submissions. Reader Nicholas S. saw this mind-boggling chart about Chris Nolan movies when Interstellar came out: This chart was part of an article by Vulture (link). It may be the first time I see not...

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An uninformative end state

November 25, 2014
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An uninformative end state

This chart cited by ZeroHedge feels like a parody. It's a bar chart that doesn't utilize the length of bars. It's a dot plot that doesn't utilize the position of dots. The range of commute times (between city centers and...

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Statistics for Big Data

November 22, 2014
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Statistics for Big Data

Doctoral programme in cloud computing for big data I’ve spent much of this year working to establish our new EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Cloud Computing for Big Data, which partly explains the lack of posts on this blog in recent months. The CDT is now established, with 11 students in the first cohort, […]

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Nominal, Ordinal, Interval, Schmordinal

November 18, 2014
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Nominal, Ordinal, Interval, Schmordinal

Everyone wants to learn about ordinal data! I have a video channel with about 40 videos about statistics, and I love watching to see which videos are getting the most viewing each day. As the Fall term has recently started … Continue reading →

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Read Before You Cite!

November 11, 2014
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Read Before You Cite!

Note to self - file this post in the "Look Before You Leap" category!Looking at The New Zealand Herald newspaper this morning, this headline caught my eye:"How Did Sir Owen Glenn's Domestic Violence Inquiry Get $7 Billion Figure Wrong?"$7&nbs...

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I can’t believe I’m citing David Brooks on data

November 6, 2014
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This is a first. I'm agreeing with David Brooks. Sort of. In his new NYT column titled "Death by Data" (link), Brooks disparaged the recently celebrated practice of using machine learning in electoral politics, such as trying to win elections "Obama-style" by targeting investments on the people most likely to listen to his message, and trying to craft electoral messages by testing and measuring how people react to certain words…

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The class pondering Big Data

October 23, 2014
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Note: I'm traveling a lot lately and it is affecting my ability to post on a regular basis. It's three weeks into my chart-building workshop (link) at NYU and we are starting to discuss individual projects. One of the major...

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Pondering OCCAM data in medicine

October 9, 2014
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Pondering OCCAM data in medicine

The New York Times Magazine has a pretty good piece about the use of OCCAM data to solve medical questions, like diagnosis and drug selection. I'm happy that it paints a balanced picture of both the promise and the pitfalls. Here are some thoughts in my head as I read this piece: Small samples coupled with small effects pose a design problem in traditional clinical trials. The subjects of the…

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Princeton’s loss of nerve

October 2, 2014
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Princeton’s loss of nerve

I have earlier reported that Princeton's new President has initiated a review of their "grade deflation" policy that was put in almost ten years ago. As you may recall (link), grading in U.S. colleges has become a farce: at top-tier schools, getting an A means you are an average student; not getting an A is many times more informative than getting an A. The new administration at Princeton has now…

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