Posts Tagged ‘ Decision Theory ’

“We can keep debating this after 11 years, but I’m sure we all have much more pressing things to do (grants? papers? family time? attacking 11-year-old papers by former classmates? guitar practice?)”

July 28, 2015
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Someone pointed me to this discussion by Lior Pachter of a controversial claim in biology. The statistics The statistical content has to do with a biology paper by M. Kellis, B. W. Birren, and E.S. Lander from 2004 that contains the following passage: Strikingly, 95% of cases of accelerated evolution involve only one member of […] The post “We can keep debating this after 11 years, but I’m sure we…

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On deck this week

July 27, 2015
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Mon: Ripped from the pages of a George Pelecanos novel Tues: “We can keep debating this after 11 years, but I’m sure we all have much more pressing things to do (grants? papers? family time? attacking 11-year-old papers by former classmates? guitar practice?)” Wed: What do I say when I don’t have much to say? […] The post On deck this week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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The 3 Stages of Busy

July 26, 2015
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Last week I ran into a younger colleague who said he had a conference deadline that week and could we get together next week, maybe? So I contacted him on the weekend and asked if he was free. He responded: This week quickly got booked after last week’s NIPS deadline. So we’re meeting in another […] The post The 3 Stages of Busy appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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On deck this week

July 20, 2015
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Mon: Richard Feynman and the tyranny of measurement Tues: A bad definition of statistical significance from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Effective Health Care Program Wed: Ta-Nehisi Coates, David Brooks, and the “street code” of journalism Thurs: Flamebait: “Mathiness” in economics and political science Fri: 45 years ago in the sister blog […] The post On deck this week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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On deck for the rest of the summer and beginning of fall

July 20, 2015
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Here’s some summer reading for you. The schedule may change because of the insertion of topical material, but this is the basic plan: Richard Feynman and the tyranny of measurement A bad definition of statistical significance from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Effective Health Care Program Ta-Nehisi Coates, David Brooks, and the […] The post On deck for the rest of the summer and beginning of fall…

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Annals of Spam

July 18, 2015
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I received the following email with subject line, “Andrew, just finished ‘Foreign language skills …'”: Andrew, Just finished http://andrewgelman.com/2010/12/24/foreign_languag/ This leads to the silliness of considering foreign language skills as a purely positional good or as a method for selecting students, while forgetting the direct benefits of being able to communicate in various ways with […] The post Annals of Spam appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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On deck this week

July 13, 2015
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Mon: Don’t do the Wilcoxon Tues: Survey weighting and regression modeling Wed: Prior information, not prior belief Thurs: Draw your own graph! Fri: Measurement is part of design Sat: Annals of Spam Sun: “17 Baby Names You Didn’t Know Were ...

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Inauthentic leadership? Development and validation of methods-based criticism

July 11, 2015
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Thomas Basbøll writes: I need some help with a critique of a paper that is part of the apparently growing retraction scandal in leadership studies. Here’s Retraction Watch. The paper I want to look at is here: “Authentic Leadership: Development and Validation of a Theory-Based Measure” By F. O. Walumbwa, B. J. Avolio, W. L. […] The post Inauthentic leadership? Development and validation of methods-based criticism appeared first on Statistical…

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Economists betting on replication

July 10, 2015
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Mark Patterson writes: A bunch of folks are collaborating on a project to replicate 18 experimental studies published in prominent Econ journals (mostly American Economic Review, a few Quarterly Journal of Economics). This is already pretty exciting, but the really cool bit is they’re opening a market (with real money) to predict which studies will […] The post Economists betting on replication appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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On deck this week

July 6, 2015
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Mon: Discreteland and Continuousland Tues: “There are many studies showing . . .” Wed: An Excel add-in for regression analysis Thurs: Unreplicable Fri: Economists betting on replication Sat: Inauthentic leadership? Development and validation ...

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