Posts Tagged ‘ Decision Theory ’

We need to stop sacrificing women on the altar of deeply mediocre men (ISBA edition)

December 14, 2017
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We need to stop sacrificing women on the altar of deeply mediocre men (ISBA edition)

(This is not Andrew. I would ask you not to speculate in the comments who S is, this is not a great venue for that.) Kristian Lum just published an essay about her experiences being sexually assaulted at statistics conferences.  You should read the whole thing because it’s important, but there’s a sample paragraph. I […] The post We need to stop sacrificing women on the altar of deeply mediocre…

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“How to Assess Internet Cures Without Falling for Dangerous Pseudoscience”

December 8, 2017
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Science writer Julie Rehmeyer discusses her own story: Five years ago, against practically anyone’s better judgment, I knowingly abandoned any semblance of medical evidence to follow the bizarre-sounding health advice of strangers on the internet. The treatment was extreme, expensive, and potentially dangerous. If that sounds like a terrible idea to you, imagine how it […] The post “How to Assess Internet Cures Without Falling for Dangerous Pseudoscience” appeared first…

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Oooh, I hate all talk of false positive, false negative, false discovery, etc.

November 30, 2017
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A correspondent writes: I think this short post on p value, bayes, and false discovery rate contains some misinterpretations. My reply: Oooh, I hate all talk of false positive, false negative, false discovery, etc. I posted this not because I care about someone, somewhere, being “wrong on the internet.” Rather, I just think there’s so […] The post Oooh, I hate all talk of false positive, false negative, false discovery,…

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What’s the point of a robustness check?

November 29, 2017
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Diomides Mavroyiannis writes: I am currently a doctoral student in economics in France, I’ve been reading your blog fo awhile and I have this question that’s bugging me. I often go to seminars where speakers present their statistical evidence for various theses. I was wondering if you could shed light on robustness checks, what is […] The post What’s the point of a robustness check? appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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“Five ways to fix statistics”

November 29, 2017
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Nature magazine just published a short feature on statistics and the replication crisis, featuring the following five op-ed-sized bits: Jeff Leek: Adjust for human cognition Blake McShane, Andrew Gelman, David Gal, Christian Robert, and Jennifer Tackett: Abandon statistical significance David Colquhoun: State false-positive risk, too Michele Nuijten: Share analysis plans and results Steven Goodman: Change […] The post “Five ways to fix statistics” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Poisoning the well with a within-person design? What’s the risk?

November 25, 2017
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I was thinking more about our recommendation that psychology researchers routinely use within-person rather than between-person designs. The quick story is that a within-person design is more statistically efficient because, when you compare measurements within a person, you should get less variation than when you compare different groups. But researchers often use between-person designs out […] The post Poisoning the well with a within-person design? What’s the risk? appeared first…

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“A Bias in the Evaluation of Bias Comparing Randomized Trials with Nonexperimental Studies”

November 20, 2017
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“A Bias in the Evaluation of Bias Comparing Randomized Trials with Nonexperimental Studies”

Jessica Franklin writes: Given your interest in post-publication peer review, I thought you might be interested in our recent experience criticizing a paper published in BMJ last year by Hemkens et al.. I realized that the method used for the primary analysis was biased, so we published a criticism with mathematical proof of the bias […] The post “A Bias in the Evaluation of Bias Comparing Randomized Trials with Nonexperimental…

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No to inferential thresholds

November 20, 2017
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Harry Crane points us to this new paper, “Why ‘Redefining Statistical Significance’ Will Not Improve Reproducibility and Could Make the Replication Crisis Worse,” and writes: Quick summary: Benjamin et al. claim that FPR would improve by factors greater than 2 and replication rates would double under their plan. That analysis ignores the existence and impact […] The post No to inferential thresholds appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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3 more articles (by others) on statistical aspects of the replication crisis

November 16, 2017
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A bunch of items came in today, all related to the replication crisis: – Valentin Amrhein points us to this fifty-authored paper, “Manipulating the alpha level cannot cure significance testing – comments on Redefine statistical significance,” by Trafimow, Amrhein, et al., who make some points similar to those made by Blake McShane et al. here. […] The post 3 more articles (by others) on statistical aspects of the replication crisis…

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What should this student do? His bosses want him to p-hack and they don’t even know it!

November 11, 2017
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Someone writes: I’m currently a PhD student in the social sciences department of a university. I recently got involved with a group of professors working on a project which involved some costly data-collection. None of them have any real statistical prowess, so they came to me to perform their analyses, which I was happy to […] The post What should this student do? His bosses want him to p-hack and…

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