Posts Tagged ‘ Decision Theory ’

Stan is hiring! hiring! hiring! hiring!

January 17, 2017
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[insert picture of adorable cat entwined with Stan logo] We’re hiring postdocs to do Bayesian inference. We’re hiring programmers for Stan. We’re hiring a project manager. How many people we hire depends on what gets funded. But we’re hiring a few people for sure. We want the best best people who love to collaborate, who […] The post Stan is hiring! hiring! hiring! hiring! appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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To know the past, one must first know the future: The relevance of decision-based thinking to statistical analysis

January 15, 2017
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We can break up any statistical problem into three steps: 1. Design and data collection. 2. Data analysis. 3. Decision making. It’s well known that step 1 typically requires some thought of steps 2 and 3: It is only when you have a sense of what you will do with your data, that you can […] The post To know the past, one must first know the future: The relevance…

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Time Inc. stoops to the level of the American Society of Human Genetics and PPNAS?

January 9, 2017
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Time Inc. stoops to the level of the American Society of Human Genetics and PPNAS?

The post Time Inc. stoops to the level of the American Society of Human Genetics and PPNAS? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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We fiddle while Rome burns: p-value edition

January 7, 2017
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We fiddle while Rome burns:  p-value edition

Raghu Parthasarathy presents a wonderfully clear example of disastrous p-value-based reasoning that he saw in a conference presentation. Here’s Raghu: Consider, for example, some tumorous cells that we can treat with drugs 1 and 2, either alone or in combination. We can make measurements of growth under our various drug treatment conditions. Suppose our measurements […] The post We fiddle while Rome burns: p-value edition appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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“Which curve fitting model should I use?”

January 6, 2017
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“Which curve fitting model should I use?”

Oswaldo Melo writes: I have learned many of curve fitting models in the past, including their technical and mathematical details. Now I have been working on real-world problems and I face a great shortcoming: which method to use. As an example, I have to predict the demand of a product. I have a time series […] The post “Which curve fitting model should I use?” appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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Two unrelated topics in one post: (1) Teaching useful algebra classes, and (2) doing more careful psychological measurements

December 30, 2016
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Kevin Lewis and Paul Alper send me so much material, I think they need their own blogs. In the meantime, I keep posting the stuff they send me, as part of my desperate effort to empty my inbox. 1. From Lewis: “Should Students Assessed as Needing Remedial Mathematics Take College-Level Quantitative Courses Instead? A Randomized […] The post Two unrelated topics in one post: (1) Teaching useful algebra classes, and…

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Sethi on Schelling

December 23, 2016
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Interesting appreciation from an economist. The post Sethi on Schelling appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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“Dirty Money: The Role of Moral History in Economic Judgments”

December 23, 2016
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“Dirty Money: The Role of Moral History in Economic Judgments”

Recently in the sister blog . . . Arber Tasimi and his coauthor write: Although traditional economic models posit that money is fungible, psychological research abounds with examples that deviate from this assumption. Across eight experiments, we provide evidence that people construe physical currency as carrying traces of its moral history. In Experiments 1 and […] The post “Dirty Money: The Role of Moral History in Economic Judgments” appeared first…

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Steve Fienberg

December 20, 2016
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I did not know Steve Fienberg well, but I met him several times and encountered his work on various occasions, which makes sense considering his research area was statistical modeling as applied to social science. Fienberg’s most influential work must have been his books on the analysis of categorical data, work that was ahead of […] The post Steve Fienberg appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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On deck very soon

December 20, 2016
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A bunch of the 170 are still in the queue. I haven’t been adding to the scheduled posts for awhile, instead I’ve been inserting topical items from time to time—I even got some vicious hate mail for my article on the electoral college—and then I’ve been shoving material for new posts into a big file […] The post On deck very soon appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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