Posts Tagged ‘ Decision Theory ’

The Ben Geen case: Did a naive interpretation of a cluster of cases send an innocent nurse to prison until 2035?

July 29, 2014
By

In a paper called “Rarity of Respiratory Arrest,” Richard Gill writes: Statistical analysis of monthly rates of events in around 20 hospitals and over a period of about 10 years shows that respiratory arrest, though about five times less frequent than cardio-respiratory arrest, is a common occurrence in the Emergency Department of a typical smaller […] The post The Ben Geen case: Did a naive interpretation of a cluster of…

Read more »

On deck this week

July 28, 2014
By

Mon: A linguist has a question about sampling when the goal is causal inference from observational data Tues: The Ben Geen case: Did a naive interpretation of a cluster of cases send an innocent nurse to prison until 2035? Wed: Statistics and data science, again Thurs: The health policy innovation center: how best to move […] The post On deck this week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

Read more »

“An Experience with a Registered Replication Project”

July 25, 2014
By

Anne Pier Salverda writes: I came across this blog entry, “An Experience with a Registered Replication Project,” and thought that you would find this interesting. It’s written by Simone Schnall, a social psychologist who is the first author of an oft-cited Psych Science(!) paper (“Cleanliness reduces the severity of moral judgments”) that a group of […] The post “An Experience with a Registered Replication Project” appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

Read more »

On deck this week

July 21, 2014
By

Mon: Skepticism about a published claim regarding income inequality and happiness Tues: Battle of the cozy comedians: What’s Alan Bennett’s problem with Stewart Lee? Wed: A world without statistics Thurs: NFL players keep getting bigger and big...

Read more »

On deck for the rest of the summer

July 20, 2014
By

Skepticism about a published claim regarding income inequality and happiness Battle of the cozy comedians: What’s Alan Bennett’s problem with Stewart Lee? A world without statistics NFL players keep getting bigger and bigger “An Experience with a Registered Replication Project” A linguist has a question about sampling when the goal is causal inference from observational […] The post On deck for the rest of the summer appeared first on Statistical…

Read more »

Differences between econometrics and statistics: From varying treatment effects to utilities, economists seem to like models that are fixed in stone, while statisticians tend to be more comfortable with variation

July 18, 2014
By
Differences between econometrics and statistics:  From varying treatment effects to utilities, economists seem to like models that are fixed in stone, while statisticians tend to be more comfortable with variation

I had an interesting discussion with Peter Dorman (whose work on assessing the value of a life we discussed in this space a few years ago). The conversation started when Peter wrote me about his recent success using hierarchical modeling for risk analysis. He wrote, “Where have they [hierarchical models] been all my life? In […] The post Differences between econometrics and statistics: From varying treatment effects to utilities, economists…

Read more »

Ethics and statistics

July 17, 2014
By

I spoke (remotely) recently at the University of Wisconsin, on the topic of ethics and statistics. Afterward, I received the following question from Fabrizzio Sanchez: As hard as it is to do, I thought it was good to try and define what exactly makes for an ethical violation. Your third point noted that it needed […] The post Ethics and statistics appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

Read more »

Stan World Cup update

July 15, 2014
By
Stan World Cup update

The other day I fit a simple model to estimate team abilities from World Cup outcomes. I fit the model to the signed square roots of the score differentials, using the square root on the theory that when the game is less close, it becomes more variable. 0. Background As you might recall, the estimated […] The post Stan World Cup update appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

Read more »

On deck this week

July 14, 2014
By

Mon: “Building on theories used to describe magnets, scientists have put together a model that captures something very different . . .” Tues: Questions about “Too Good to Be True” Wed: “The Europeans and Australians were too eager to believe in renal denervation” Thurs: Ethics and statistics Fri: Differences between econometrics and statistics: From varying […] The post On deck this week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

Read more »

Open-source tools for running online field experiments

July 10, 2014
By

Dean Eckles points me to this cool new tool for experimentation: I [Eckles] just wanted to share that in a collaboration between Facebook and Stanford, we have a new paper out about running online field experiments. One thing this paper does is describe some of the tools we use to design, deploy, and analyze experiments, […] The post Open-source tools for running online field experiments appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

Read more »


Subscribe

Email:

  Subscribe