Posts Tagged ‘ Decision Theory ’

Looking for rigor in all the wrong places (my talk this Thursday in the Columbia economics department)

February 21, 2017
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Looking for rigor in all the wrong places (my talk this Thursday in the Columbia economics department)

Looking for Rigor in All the Wrong Places What do the following ideas and practices have in common: unbiased estimation, statistical significance, insistence on random sampling, and avoidance of prior information? All have been embraced as ways of enforcing rigor but all have backfired and led to sloppy analyses and erroneous inferences. We discuss these […] The post Looking for rigor in all the wrong places (my talk this Thursday…

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“Luckily, medicine is a practice that ignores the requirements of science in favor of patient care.”

February 19, 2017
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“Luckily, medicine is a practice that ignores the requirements of science in favor of patient care.”

Javier Benitez writes: This is a paragraph from Kathryn Montgomery’s book, How Doctors Think: If medicine were practiced as if it were a science, even a probabilistic science, my daughter’s breast cancer might never have been diagnosed in time. At 28, she was quite literally off the charts, far too young, an unlikely patient who […] The post “Luckily, medicine is a practice that ignores the requirements of science in…

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Pizzagate and Kahneman, two great flavors etc.

February 18, 2017
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Pizzagate and Kahneman, two great flavors etc.

1. The pizzagate story (of Brian Wansink, the Cornell University business school professor and self-described “world-renowned eating behavior expert for over 25 years”) keeps developing. Last week someone forwarded me an email from the deputy dean of the Cornell business school regarding concerns about some of Wansink’s work. This person asked me to post the […] The post Pizzagate and Kahneman, two great flavors etc. appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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Measurement error and the replication crisis

February 11, 2017
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Measurement error and the replication crisis

Alison McCook from Retraction Watch interviewed Eric Loken and me regarding our recent article, “Measurement error and the replication crisis.” We talked about why traditional statistics are often counterproductive to research in the human sciences. Here’s the interview: Retraction Watch: Your article focuses on the “noise” that’s present in research studies. What is “noise” and […] The post Measurement error and the replication crisis appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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Theoretical statistics is the theory of applied statistics: how to think about what we do (My talk at the University of Michigan this Friday 3pm)

February 7, 2017
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Theoretical statistics is the theory of applied statistics: how to think about what we do (My talk at the University of Michigan this Friday 3pm)

Theoretical statistics is the theory of applied statistics: how to think about what we do Andrew Gelman, Department of Statistics and Department of Political Science, Columbia University Working scientists and engineers commonly feel that philosophy is a waste of time. But theoretical and philosophical principles can guide practice, so it makes sense for us to […] The post Theoretical statistics is the theory of applied statistics: how to think about…

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The “What does not kill my statistical significance makes it stronger” fallacy

February 6, 2017
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The “What does not kill my statistical significance makes it stronger” fallacy

As anyone who’s designed a study and gathered data can tell you, getting statistical significance is difficult. Lots of our best ideas don’t pan out, and even if a hypothesis seems to be supported by the data, the magic “p less than .05” can be elusive. And we also know that noisy data and small […] The post The “What does not kill my statistical significance makes it stronger” fallacy…

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Long Shot

February 5, 2017
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Frank Harrell doesn’t like p-values: In my [Frank’s] opinion, null hypothesis testing and p-values have done significant harm to science. The purpose of this note is to catalog the many problems caused by p-values. As readers post new problems in their comments, more will be incorporated into the list, so this is a work in […] The post Long Shot appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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Pizzagate, or the curious incident of the researcher in response to to people pointing out 150 errors in four of his papers

February 3, 2017
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Pizzagate, or the curious incident of the researcher in response to to people pointing out 150 errors in four of his papers

There are a bunch of things about this story that just don’t make a lot of sense to me. For those who haven’t been following the blog recently, here’s the quick backstory: Brian Wansink is a Cornell University business school professor and self-described “world-renowned eating behavior expert for over 25 years.” It’s come out that […] The post Pizzagate, or the curious incident of the researcher in response to to…

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Pizzagate, or the curious incident of the researcher in response to people pointing out 150 errors in four of his papers

February 3, 2017
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Pizzagate, or the curious incident of the researcher in response to people pointing out 150 errors in four of his papers

There are a bunch of things about this story that just don’t make a lot of sense to me. For those who haven’t been following the blog recently, here’s the quick backstory: Brian Wansink is a Cornell University business school professor and self-described “world-renowned eating behavior expert for over 25 years.” It’s come out that […] The post Pizzagate, or the curious incident of the researcher in response to people…

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Criticism of bad research: More harm than good?

January 31, 2017
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Criticism of bad research:  More harm than good?

We’ve had some recent posts (here and here) about the research of Brian Wansink, a Cornell University business professor who’s found fame and fortune from doing empirical research on eating behaviors. It’s come out that four of his recent papers—all of them derived from a single experiment which Wansink himself described as a “failed study […] The post Criticism of bad research: More harm than good? appeared first on Statistical…

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