Posts Tagged ‘ Decision Theory ’

On deck this week

June 27, 2016
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Mon: How is Brexit different than Texit, Quexit, or Scotxit? Tues: Should this paper in Psychological Science be retracted? The data do not conclusively demonstrate the claim, nor do they provide strong evidence in favor. The data are, however, consistent with the claim (as well as being consistent with no effect) Wed: Individual and aggregate […] The post On deck this week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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On deck this week

June 20, 2016
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Mon: Clarke’s Law: Any sufficiently crappy research is indistinguishable from fraud Tues: Reduced-dimensionality parameterizations for linear models with interactions Wed: Time-reversal heuristic as randomization, and p < .05 as conflict of interest declaration Thurs: It comes down to reality and it’s fine with me cause I’ve let it slide Fri: Can a census-tract-level regression analysis […] The post On deck this week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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The answer is the Edlin factor

June 13, 2016
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Garnett McMillan writes: You have argued about the pervasive role of the Garden of Forking Paths in published research. Given this influence, do you think that it is sensible to use published research to inform priors in new studies? My reply: Yes, I think you can use published research but in doing so you should […] The post The answer is the Edlin factor appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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On deck this week

June 13, 2016
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Mon: They threatened to sue Mike Spagat but that’s not shutting him up Tues: “Smaller Share of Women Ages 65 and Older Are Living Alone,” before and after age adjusment Wed: Objects of the class “Pauline Kael” Thurs: research-lies-allegations-windpipe-surgery Fri: Hey—here’s a tip from the biology literature: If your correlation is .02, try binning your […] The post On deck this week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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On deck this week

June 7, 2016
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Social problems with a paper in Social Problems Donald Trump and Joe McCarthy “What is a good, convincing example in which p-values are useful?” “How One Study Produced a Bunch of Untrue Headlines About Tattoos Strengthening Your Immune System” No, I’m not convinced by this one either. How to design a survey so that Mister […] The post On deck this week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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On deck this week

May 30, 2016
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Mon: All that really important statistics stuff that isn’t in the statistics textbooks Tues: Who marries whom? Wed: Gray graphs look pretty Thurs: Freak Punts on Leicester Bet Fri: Who falls for the education reform hype? Sat: Taking responsibility for your statistical conclusions: You must decide what variation to compare to. Sun: Researchers demonstrate new […] The post On deck this week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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On deck this week

May 23, 2016
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Mon: Splitsville for Thiel and Kasparov? Tues: Here’s something I know nothing about Wed: The “power pose” of the 6th century B.C. Thurs: “99.60% for women and 99.58% for men, P < 0.05.” Fri: Stan on the beach Sat: Michael Lacour vs John Bargh and Amy Cuddy Sun: Should he major in political science and […] The post On deck this week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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Is fraac Scott Adams?

May 17, 2016
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Is fraac Scott Adams?

tl;dr: If you value your time, don’t read this post. In favor of the fraac=Adams hypothesis: 1. Fraac came to our attention with a burst of comments on my 2011 post on Scott Adams and Charlie Sheen. Here’s fraac, defending Adams in a very Adams-like way: Besides the fact that fraac is one of the […] The post Is fraac Scott Adams? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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On deck this week

May 16, 2016
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On deck this week

Birthdays, baseball, zombies, luxury . . . and fraac! The post On deck this week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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Peer review abuse flashback

May 15, 2016
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Peer review abuse flashback

Our recent discussion of the problems with peer review reminded me of this amusing/horrifying story from a few years ago, when some researchers noticed a data coding error in a published paper Once it was noticed, the error was obvious: But the authors of the original paper had that never-back-down attitude. So instead of thanking […] The post Peer review abuse flashback appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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