Posts Tagged ‘ Decision Theory ’

Bayesian, but not Bayesian enough

June 28, 2017
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Bayesian, but not Bayesian enough

Will Moir writes: This short New York Times article on a study published in BMJ might be of interest to you and your blog community, both in terms of how the media reports science and also the use of bayesian vs frequentist statistics in the study itself. Here is the short summary from the news […] The post Bayesian, but not Bayesian enough appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Problems with the jargon “statistically significant” and “clinically significant”

June 26, 2017
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Someone writes: After listening to your EconTalk episode a few weeks ago, I have a question about interpreting treatment effect magnitudes, effect sizes, SDs, etc. I studied Econ/Math undergrad and worked at a social science research institution in health policy as a research assistant, so I have a good amount of background. At the institution […] The post Problems with the jargon “statistically significant” and “clinically significant” appeared first on…

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Analyze all your comparisons. That’s better than looking at the max difference and trying to do a multiple comparisons correction.

June 25, 2017
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Analyze all your comparisons.  That’s better than looking at the max difference and trying to do a multiple comparisons correction.

[cat picture] The following email came in: I’m in a PhD program (poli sci) with a heavy emphasis on methods. One thing that my statistics courses emphasize, but that doesn’t get much attention in my poli sci courses, is the problem of simultaneous inferences. This strikes me as a problem. I am a bit unclear […] The post Analyze all your comparisons. That’s better than looking at the max difference…

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On deck through the rest of the year (and a few to begin 2018)

June 20, 2017
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Here they are. I love seeing all the titles lined up in one place; it’s like a big beautiful poem about statistics: After Peptidegate, a proposed new slogan for PPNAS. And, as a bonus, a fun little graphics project. “Developers Who Use Spaces Make More Money Than Those Who Use Tabs” Question about the secret […] The post On deck through the rest of the year (and a few to…

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Ride a Crooked Mile

June 14, 2017
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Joachim Krueger writes: As many of us rely (in part) on p values when trying to make sense of the data, I am sending a link to a paper Patrick Heck and I published in Frontiers in Psychology. The goal of this work is not to fan the flames of the already overheated debate, but […] The post Ride a Crooked Mile appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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The Publicity Factory: How even serious research gets exaggerated by the process of scientific publication and media exposure

June 6, 2017
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The starting point is that we’ve seen a lot of talk about frivolous science, headline-bait such as the study that said that married women are more likely to vote for Mitt Romney when ovulating, or the study that said that girl-named hurricanes are more deadly than boy-named hurricanes, and at this point some of these […] The post The Publicity Factory: How even serious research gets exaggerated by the process…

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How has my advice to psychology researchers changed since 2013?

June 5, 2017
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Four years ago, in a post entitled, “How can statisticians help psychologists do their research better?”, I gave the following recommendations to researchers: – Analyze all your data. – Present all your comparisons. – Make your data public. And, for journal editors, I wrote, “if a paper is nothing special, you don’t have to publish […] The post How has my advice to psychology researchers changed since 2013? appeared first…

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All the things we have to do that we don’t really need to do: The social cost of junk science

May 28, 2017
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I’ve been thinking a lot about junk science lately. Some people have said it’s counterproductive or rude of me to keep talking about the same few examples (actually I think we have about 15 or so examples that come up again and again), so let me just speak generically about the sort of scientific claim […] The post All the things we have to do that we don’t really need…

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The Other Side of the Night

May 24, 2017
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The Other Side of the Night

Don Green points us to this quantitative/qualitative meta-analysis he did with Betsy Levy Paluck and Seth Green. The paper begins: This paper evaluates the state of contact hypothesis research from a policy perspective. Building on Pettigrew and Tropp’s (2006) influential meta-analysis, we assemble all intergroup contact studies that feature random assignment and delayed outcome measures, […] The post The Other Side of the Night appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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PCI Statistics: A preprint review peer community in statistics

May 24, 2017
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PCI Statistics:  A preprint review peer community in statistics

X informs me of a new effort, “Peer community in . . .”, which describes itself as “a free recommendation process of published and unpublished scientific papers.” So far this exists in only one field, Evolutionary Biology. But this looks like a great idea and I expect it will soon exist in statistics, political science, […] The post PCI Statistics: A preprint review peer community in statistics appeared first on…

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