IF-THEN logic with matrix expressions

January 26, 2015
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IF-THEN logic with matrix expressions

In the SAS DATA step, all variables are scalar quantities. Consequently, an IF-THEN/ELSE statement that evaluates a logical expression is unambiguous. For example, the following DATA step statements print "c=5 is TRUE" to the log if the variable c is equal to 5: if c=5 then put "c=5 is TRUE"; […]

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Seminal InfoVis Paper: Treisman, Preattentive Processing

January 26, 2015
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Seminal InfoVis Paper: Treisman, Preattentive Processing

A paper on a specific cognitive mechanism may seems like an odd choice as the first paper in this series, but it is the one that sparked the idea for it. It is also the one that has its 30th birthday this year, having been published in August 1985. And it is an important paper, and … Continue reading Seminal InfoVis Paper: Treisman, Preattentive Processing

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Seminal InfoVis Papers: Introduction

January 26, 2015
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Some of the most fundamental and important papers in information visualization are around 30 years old. This is interesting for several reasons. For one, it shows that the field is still very young. Most research fields go back much, much further. Even within such a short time frame, though, there is a danger of not … Continue reading Seminal InfoVis Papers: Introduction

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Nassim Taleb Graphic

January 25, 2015
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Nassim Taleb Graphic

This arrived a couple weeks ago from Nassim Taleb. Regardless of where your view falls on the black swan spectrum, I hope you'll like the graphic. One hallmark of a good graphic is that it repays careful study, as with a good map (which is a good ...

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Big Analytics

January 25, 2015
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Big Analytics

Technology Predictions for 2015 For 2015, Bing predicts the same three technologies for all continents to be in the first …Continue reading →

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Big Analytics

January 25, 2015
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Big Analytics

Technology Predictions for 2015 For 2015, Bing predicts the same three technologies for all continents to be in the first …Continue reading →

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Tell me what you don’t know

January 25, 2015
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We’ll ask an expert, or even a student, to “tell me what you know” about some topic. But now I’m thinking it makes more sense to ask people to tell us what they don’t know. Why? Consider your understanding of a particular topic to be divided into three parts: 1. What you know. 2. What […] The post Tell me what you don’t know appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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Odds, odds ratio, language and intuition

January 25, 2015
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I was reading a statistics book the other day. I am at the beginning. In this section I read '(we) report results as odds ratios, which is more intuitive'. I must have read sentences stating this any number of times. But I don't agree.It may be my back...

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Postdoc opportunity here, with us (Jennifer Hill, Marc Scott, and me)! On quantitative education research!!

January 25, 2015
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Hop the Q-TRAIN: that is, the Quantitative Training Program, a postdoctoral research program supervised by Jennifer Hill, Marc Scott, and myself, and funded by the Institute for Education Sciences. As many of you are aware, education research is both important and challenging. And, on the technical level, we’re working on problems in Bayesian inference, multilevel […] The post Postdoc opportunity here, with us (Jennifer Hill, Marc Scott, and me)! On…

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What do these share in common: m&ms, limbo stick, ovulation, Dale Carnegie? Sat night potpourri

January 25, 2015
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What do these share in common: m&ms, limbo stick, ovulation, Dale Carnegie? Sat night potpourri

Here’s the follow-up to my last (reblogged) post. initially here. My take hasn’t changed much from 2013. Should we be labeling some pursuits “for entertainment only”? Why not? (See also a later post on the replication crisis in psych.) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ I had said I would label as pseudoscience or questionable science any enterprise that regularly permits the kind of […]

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Extreme Value Modelling in Stata

January 25, 2015
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Extreme Value Modelling in Stata

David Roodman wrote to me today, saying:"I don’t know if you use Stata, but I’ve just released a Stata package for extreme value theory. It is strongly influenced by Coles’s book on EVT and the associated ismev package for R. Using maximum likeli...

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Calling R from Scala sbt projects

January 24, 2015
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Calling R from Scala sbt projects

Overview In previous posts I’ve shown how the jvmr CRAN R package can be used to call Scala sbt projects from R and inline Scala Breeze code in R. In this post I will show how to call to R from a Scala sbt project. This requires that R and the jvmr CRAN R package […]

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“What then should we teach about hypothesis testing?”

January 24, 2015
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Someone who wishes to remain anonymous writes in: Last week, I was looking forward to a blog post titled “Why continue to teach and use hypothesis testing?” I presume that this scheduled post merely became preempted by more timely posts. But I am still interested in reading the exchange that will follow. My feeling is […] The post “What then should we teach about hypothesis testing?” appeared first on Statistical…

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RSS feeds for statistics and related journals

January 23, 2015
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RSS feeds for statistics and related journals

I’ve now resurrected the collection of research journals that I follow, and set it up as a shared collection in feedly. So anyone can easily subscribe to all of the same journals, or select a subset of them, to follow on feedly. There are about 90 journals on the list, mostly in statistics, but some from machine […]

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Assertive R programming in dplyr/magrittr pipelines

January 23, 2015
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Assertive R programming in dplyr/magrittr pipelines

A lot of my job–and side projects, for that matter–involve running R scripts on updates of open government data. While I’m infinitely grateful to have access to any interesting open datasets in the first place, I can’t ignore that dealing… Continue reading →

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How Optimizely will kill your winning percentage, and why that is a great thing for you (Part 1)

January 23, 2015
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In my HBR article about A/B testing (link), I described one of the key managerial problems related to A/B testing--the surplus of “positive” results that don’t quite seem to add up. In particular, I mentioned this issue: When managers are reading hour-by-hour results, they will sometimes find large gaps between Groups A and B, and demand prompt reaction. Almost all such fluctuations result from temporary imbalance between the two groups,…

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What’s the point of the margin of error?

January 23, 2015
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So . . . the scheduled debate on using margin of error with non-probability panels never happened. We got it started but there was some problem with the webinar software and nobody put the participants could hear anything. The 5 minutes of conversation we did have was pretty good, though. I was impressed. The webinar […] The post What’s the point of the margin of error? appeared first on Statistical…

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Link: Data Stories Podcast 2014 Review

January 22, 2015
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Episode 46 of the Data Stories podcast features Andy Kirk and yours truly in an epic battle for podcast dominance a review of the year 2014. This complements well my State of Information Visualization posting, and of course there is a bit of overlap (I wrote that posting after we recorded the episode – Moritz and Enrico are so slow). … Continue reading Link: Data Stories Podcast 2014 Review

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Patience and research

January 22, 2015
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I’m going to follow up on a recent post of Thomas Basbøll and argue that patience is an important, and I think under-appreciated, practice in research. This is an odd post for me to write because I’m usually not a patient person. In some ways, though, and surprising as it may sound, blogging is a […] The post Patience and research appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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Sequential Monte Carlo 2015 workshop

January 22, 2015
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Sequential Monte Carlo 2015 workshop

An announcement for the SMC 2015 workshop: Sequential Monte Carlo methods (also known as particle filters) have revolutionized the on-line and off-line analysis of data in fields as diverse as target tracking, computer vision, financial modelling, brain imagery, or population ecology. Their popularity stems from the fact that they have made possible to solve numerically many […]

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About replication bullies and scientific progress …

January 22, 2015
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These days psychology really is exciting, and I do not mean the Förster case … In May 2014 a special issue full of replication attempts has been released – all open access, all raw data released! This is great work, powered by the open sci...

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What is an empty matrix?

January 22, 2015
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What is an empty matrix?

At the beginning of my book Statistical Programming with SAS/IML Software I give the following programming tip (p. 25): Do not confuse an empty matrix with a matrix that contains missing values or with a zero matrix. An empty matrix has no rows and no columns. A matrix that contains […]

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Some statistical dirty laundry

January 22, 2015
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Some statistical dirty laundry

It’s an apt time to reblog the “statistical dirty laundry” post from 2013 here. I hope we can take up the recommendations from Simmons, Nelson and Simonsohn at the end (Note [5]), which we didn’t last time around. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ I finally had a chance to fully read the 2012 Tilberg Report* on “Flawed Science” last night. Here are […]

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