Where the fat people at?

February 3, 2016
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Where the fat people at?

Pearly Dhingra points me to this article, “The Geographic Distribution of Obesity in the US and the Potential Regional Differences in Misreporting of Obesity,” by Anh Le, Suzanne Judd, David Allison, Reena Oza-Frank, Olivia Affuso, Monika Safford, Virginia Howard, and George Howard, who write: Data from BRFSS [the behavioral risk factor surveillance system] suggest that […] The post Where the fat people at? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Rolling statistics in SAS/IML

February 3, 2016
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Rolling statistics in SAS/IML

Last week I showed how to use PROC EXPAND to compute moving averages and other rolling statistics in SAS. Unfortunately, PROC EXPAND is part of SAS/ETS software and not every SAS site has a license for SAS/ETS. For simple moving averages, you can write a DATA step program, as discussed […] The post Rolling statistics in SAS/IML appeared first on The DO Loop.

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Young folks

February 3, 2016
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We (as in Significance, in partnership with the Young Statisticians Section of the Royal Statistical Society) have just launched the 2016 Young Statisticians Writing Competition. The competition is open to any young statistician, regardless o...

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What does it mean to understand statistics?

February 3, 2016
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What does it mean to understand statistics?

It is possible to get a passing grade in a statistics paper by putting numbers into formulas and words into memorised phrases. In fact I suspect that this is a popular way for students to make their way through a … Continue reading →

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Hey—go to Iceland and work on glaciers!

February 3, 2016
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Hey—go to Iceland and work on glaciers!

Egil Ferkingstad and Birgir Hrafnkelsson write: We have an exciting PhD position here at the University of Iceland on developing Bayesian hierarchical spatio-temporal models to the field of glaciology. Havard Rue at NTNU, Trondheim and Chris Wikle at the University of Missouri will also be part of the project. The Department of Mathematics at the […] The post Hey—go to Iceland and work on glaciers! appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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February Reading List

February 2, 2016
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February Reading List

Here's a suggested reading list for February:Casey, G. and M. Klemp, 2016. Instrumental variables in the long run. MPRA Paper No. 68696.Coglianese, J., L. W. Davis, L. Kilian, and J. H. Stock, 2016. Anticipation, tax avoidance, and the price elasticity...

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Unemployment in Europe

February 2, 2016
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Unemployment in Europe

A couple of years I have made plots of unemployment and its change over the years. At first this was a bigger and complex piece of code. As things have progressed, the code can now become pretty concise. There are just plenty of packages to do the heav...

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Summer internship positions for undergraduate students with Aki

February 2, 2016
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There are couple cool summer internship positions for undergraduate students (BSc level) in Probabilistic Machine Learning group at Aalto (Finland) with me (Aki) and Samuel Kaski. Possible research topics are related to Bayesian inference, machine learning, Stan, disease risk prediction, personalised medicine, computational biology, contextual information retrieval, information visualization, etc. Application deadline 18 February. See more […] The post Summer internship positions for undergraduate students with Aki appeared first on Statistical…

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Stunning breakthrough: Using Stan to map cancer screening!

February 2, 2016
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Stunning breakthrough:  Using Stan to map cancer screening!

Paul Alper points me to this article, Breast Cancer Screening, Incidence, and Mortality Across US Counties, by Charles Harding, Francesco Pompei, Dmitriy Burmistrov, Gilbert Welch, Rediet Abebe, and Richard Wilson. Their substantive conclusion is there’s too much screening going on, but here I want to focus on their statistical methods: Spline methods were used to […] The post Stunning breakthrough: Using Stan to map cancer screening! appeared first on Statistical…

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Stunning breakthrough: Using Stan to map cancer screening!

February 2, 2016
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Stunning breakthrough:  Using Stan to map cancer screening!

Paul Alper points me to this article, Breast Cancer Screening, Incidence, and Mortality Across US Counties, by Charles Harding, Francesco Pompei, Dmitriy Burmistrov, Gilbert Welch, Rediet Abebe, and Richard Wilson. Their substantive conclusion is there’s too much screening going on, but here I want to focus on their statistical methods: Spline methods were used to […] The post Stunning breakthrough: Using Stan to map cancer screening! appeared first on Statistical…

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Know your data 18: your location is our product

February 2, 2016
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In the last post in the Know Your Data series, I discussed how Uber can use its vast database of your personal trips against your personal interests. (This does not preclude the possibility that they use the data for your benefit.) It turns out that something more ominous is at foot… a number of news outlets have just published investigative reports about a company known as Vigilant Solutions (EFF, The…

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First Bayesian Mixer Meeting in London

February 2, 2016
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First Bayesian Mixer Meeting in London

There is a nice pub between Bunhill Fields and the Royal Statistical Society in London: The Artillery Arms. Clearly, the perfect place to bring people together to talk about Bayesian Statistics. Well, that’s what Jon Sedar (@jonsedar, applied.ai) and...

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2015 Year in Graphics Links

February 2, 2016
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2015 Year in Graphics Links

A bit late, but here are links to a few round-ups of graphical journalism work from last year. These are always worth a look, no matter what time of year. Bloomberg, 2015 in Graphics The New York Times, 2015: The Year in Visual Stories and Graphics ProPublica, The 2015 ProPublica Year in Visual Storytelling The Wall Street … Continue reading 2015 Year in Graphics Links

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Le Monde puzzle [#947]

February 1, 2016
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Le Monde puzzle [#947]

Another boardgame in Le Monde mathematical puzzle : Given an 8×8 chequerboard,  consider placing 2×2 tiles over this chequerboard until (a) the entire surface is covered and (b) removing a single 2×2 tile exposes some of the original chequerboard. What is the maximal number of 2×2 tiles one can set according to this scheme? And for […]

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A menagerie of messed up data analyses and how to avoid them

February 1, 2016
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A menagerie of messed up data analyses and how to avoid them

Update: I realize this may seem like I'm picking on people. I really don't mean to, I have for sure made all of these mistakes and many more. I can give many examples, but the one I always remember is the time Rafa saved me from "I got a big one here" when I made

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When does peer review make no damn sense?

February 1, 2016
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When does peer review make no damn sense?

Disclaimer: This post is not peer reviewed in the traditional sense of being vetted for publication by three people with backgrounds similar to mine. Instead, thousands of commenters, many of whom are not my peers—in the useful sense that, not being my peers, your perspectives are different from mine, and you might catch big conceptual […] The post When does peer review make no damn sense? appeared first on Statistical…

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On deck this week

February 1, 2016
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Mon: When does peer review make no damn sense? Tues: Stunning breakthrough: Using Stan to map cancer screening! Wed: Where the fat people at? Thurs: The Notorious N.H.S.T. presents: Mo P-values Mo Problems Fri: What’s the difference between randomness and uncertainty? Sat: You’ll never guess what I say when I have nothing to say Sun: […] The post On deck this week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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As First Lady, Popularity of Babies Named "Hillary" Dropped by an Unprecedented 90%

February 1, 2016
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As First Lady, Popularity of Babies Named "Hillary" Dropped by an Unprecedented 90%

In this article I examine the dramatic drop in the popularity of naming babies "Hillary" beginning at the start of President Bill Clinton's term. In order to understand the context of that drop, I look at the popularity of the first names of other Firs...

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Reproducible randomized controlled trials

February 1, 2016
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Reproducible randomized controlled trials

“Reproducible” and “randomized” don’t seem to go together. If something was unpredictable the first time, shouldn’t it be unpredictable if you start over and run it again? As is often the case, we want incompatible things. But the combination of reproducible and random can be reconciled. Why would we want a randomized controlled trial (RCT) to […]

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Group processing in SAS: The NOTSORTED option

February 1, 2016
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Group processing in SAS: The NOTSORTED option

Novice SAS programmers quickly learn the advantages of using PROC SORT to sort data, followed by a BY-group analysis of the sorted data. A typical example is to analyze demographic data by state or by ZIP code. A BY statement enables you to produce multiple analyses from a single procedure […] The post Group processing in SAS: The NOTSORTED option appeared first on The DO Loop.

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Ted Cruz angling for a position in the Stanford poli sci department

January 31, 2016
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Ted Cruz angling for a position in the Stanford poli sci department

In an amusing alignment of political and academic scandals, presidential candidate Ted Cruz was blasted for sending prospective voters in the Iowa Caucus this misleading mailer: Which reminds me of the uproar two years ago when a couple of Stanford political science professors sent prospective Montana voters this misleading mailer: I don’t know which is […] The post Ted Cruz angling for a position in the Stanford poli sci department…

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Postdoc opportunity with Sophia Rabe-Hesketh and me in Berkeley!

January 31, 2016
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Sophia writes: Mark Wilson, Zach Pardos and I are looking for a postdoc to work with us on a range of projects related to educational assessment and statistical modeling, such as Bayesian modeling in Stan (joint with Andrew Gelman). See here for more details. We will accept applications until February 26. The position is for […] The post Postdoc opportunity with Sophia Rabe-Hesketh and me in Berkeley! appeared first on…

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Shrinking VAR’s Toward Theory: Supplanting the Minnesota Prior?

January 31, 2016
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A recent post, On Bayesian DSGE Modeling with Hard and Soft Restrictions, ended with: "A related issue is whether 'theory priors' will supplant others, like the 'Minnesota prior'. I'll save that for a later post." This is that later post. Its title ref...

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