HTML Widgets for Non-HTML Output Formats

Not surprisingly, HTML widgets were designed for HTML output formats (e.g., rmarkdown::html_document and rmarkdown::ioslides_presentation). Their interactivity relies on JavaScript. In general, you should not expect JavaScript to work in LaTeX/PDF or Word or PowerPoint. In January 2015, I gave an introductory talk on HTML widgets in the LA R User Group. I joked in the talk that “If you ask me how to use HTML widgets in Word or LaTeX,…

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Books to Read While the Algae Grow in Your Fur, December 2016

June 18, 2018
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Attention conservation notice: I have no taste. Laila Lalami, The Moor's Account Historical fiction, in which the Narvaez expedition across what's now the American South and Southwest in the early 1500s is told from the view-point of the Moorish ...

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Power analysis and NIH-style statistical practice: What’s the implicit model?

June 18, 2018
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Power analysis and NIH-style statistical practice:  What’s the implicit model?

So. Following up on our discussion of “the 80% power lie,” I was thinking about the implicit model underlying NIH’s 80% power rule. Several commenters pointed out that, to have your study design approved by NSF, it’s not required that you demonstrate that you have 80% power for real; what’s needed is to show 80% […] The post Power analysis and NIH-style statistical practice: What’s the implicit model? appeared first…

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The BOOTSTRAP statement for t tests in SAS

June 18, 2018
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The BOOTSTRAP statement for t tests in SAS

Bootstrap resampling is a powerful way to estimate the standard error for a statistic without making any parametric assumptions about its sampling distribution. The bootstrap method is often implemented by using a sequence of calls to resample from the data, compute a statistic on each sample, and analyze the bootstrap [...] The post The BOOTSTRAP statement for t tests in SAS appeared first on The DO Loop.

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10th ECB Workshop on Forecasting Techniques, Frankfurt

June 18, 2018
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Starts now, program here. Looks like a great lineup. Most of the papers are posted, and the organizers also plan to post presentation slides following the conference. Presumably in future weeks I'll blog on some of the presentations.

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The Role of Resources in Data Analysis

June 18, 2018
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When learning about data analysis in school, you don’t hear much about the role that resources—time, money, and technology—play in the development of analysis. This is a conversation that is often had “in the hallway” when talking t...

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One Little Thing: knitr::combine_words()

One Little Thing: knitr::combine_words()

When you want to output a character vector for humans to read, you probably don’t want something like [1] a b c, which is the normal way to print a vector in R. Instead, you may want a character string "a, b, and c" (Oxford comma FTW!). In 2014, I gave a guest lecture in a course at Iowa State. I prepared an example in which I wanted to output…

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Bayesians are frequentists

June 17, 2018
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Bayesians are frequentists. What I mean is, the Bayesian prior distribution corresponds to the frequentist sample space: it’s the set of problems for which a particular statistical model or procedure will be applied. I was thinking about this in the context of this question from Vlad Malik: I noticed this comment on Twitter in reference […] The post Bayesians are frequentists appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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Chasing the noise in industrial A/B testing: what to do when all the low-hanging fruit have been picked?

June 16, 2018
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Commenting on this post on the “80% power” lie, Roger Bohn writes: The low power problem bugged me so much in the semiconductor industry that I wrote 2 papers about around 1995. Variability estimates come naturally from routine manufacturing statistics, which in semicon were tracked carefully because they are economically important. The sample size is […] The post Chasing the noise in industrial A/B testing: what to do when all…

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One Little Thing: Touch a Source File in a blogdown Website

One Little Thing: Touch a Source File in a blogdown Website

Motivated by a blogdown issue raised by Liang Zhang, I added an RStudio addin named “Touch File” in blogdown last month to update the modification time of the current file in RStudio. Most blogdown users should already know the LiveReload feature, which means if you edit a source file and save it, your website will be automatically rebuilt and refreshed in the RStudio viewer once you have used the “Serve…

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One Little Thing: Quote a Poem with blogdown

One of the most frequent topics on which I blog in recent years is Chinese literature (of course, only in my Chinese blog). In particular, I often quote poems in my posts. To quote a poem in Markdown, you have to add two trailing spaces after every line of the poem. Two trailing spaces means a hard line break in Markdown. A line break in the Markdown source does not…

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Stan goes to the World Cup

June 15, 2018
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Stan goes to the World Cup

Leo Egidi shares his 2018 World Cup model, which he’s fitting in Stan. But I don’t like this: First, something’s missing. Where’s the U.S.?? More seriously, what’s with that “16.74%” thing? So bogus. You might as well say you’re 66.31 inches tall. Anyway, as is often the case with Bayesian models, the point here is […] The post Stan goes to the World Cup appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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One good and one bad response to statistics’ diversity problem

June 15, 2018
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(This is Dan) As conference season rolls into gear, I thought I’d write a short post contrasting some responses by statistical societies to the conversation that the community has been having about harassment of women and minorities at workshops and conferences. ISI: Do what I say, not what I do Let’s look at a different diversity […] The post One good and one bad response to statistics’ diversity problem appeared first…

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About that quasi-retracted study on the Mediterranean diet . . .

June 15, 2018
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Some people asked me what I thought about this story. A reporter wrote to me about it last week, asking if it looked like fraud. Here’s my reply: Based on the description, there does not seem to be the implication of fraud. The editor’s report mentioned “protocol deviations, including the enrollment of participants who were […] The post About that quasi-retracted study on the Mediterranean diet . . . appeared…

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Video: New random number generators in SAS

June 15, 2018
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Video: New random number generators in SAS

My 2018 SAS Global Forum paper was about "how to use the random-number generators (RNGs) in SAS." You can read the paper for details, but I recently recorded a short video that summarizes the main ideas in the paper. In particular, the video gives an overview of the new RNGs [...] The post Video: New random number generators in SAS appeared first on The DO Loop.

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People vs. Institutions in Data Analysis

June 15, 2018
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In my post about relationships in data analysis I got a little push back regarding whether human relationships would ever not be important in data analysis and whether that has anything to do with the “maturity” of the field. I believe hu...

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Stan Workshop on Pharmacometrics—Paris, 24 July 2018

June 14, 2018
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What: A one-day event organized by France Mentre (IAME, INSERM, Univ SPC, Univ Paris 7, Univ Paris 13) and Julie Bertrand (INSERM) and sponsored by the International Society of Pharmacometrics (ISoP). When: Tuesday 24 July 2018 Where: Faculté Bichat, 16 rue Henri Huchard, 75018 Paris Free Registration: Registration is being handled by ISoP; please click […] The post Stan Workshop on Pharmacometrics—Paris, 24 July 2018 appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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Do women want more children than they end up having?

June 14, 2018
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Abigail Haddad writes: In The post Do women want more children than they end up having? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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Books to Read While the Algae Grow in Your Fur, January 2017

June 14, 2018
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Attention conservation notice: I have no taste. David Wong, This Book Is Full of Spiders: Seriously, Dude, Don't Touch It Mind candy horror and juvenile humor (informed by reading about actual social solidarity during disasters); loosely a sequel ...

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A Comparative Review of the Deducer GUI for R

June 14, 2018
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A Comparative Review of the Deducer GUI for R

Introduction Deducer is a free and open source Graphical User Interface for the R software, one that provides beginners a way to point-and-click their way through analyses. It also integrates into an environment designed to help programmers be more productive. … Continue reading →

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Build Binary R Packages for the Homebrew Version of R?

Build Binary R Packages for the Homebrew Version of R?

One of the open source projects is not like the others. The project is called Homebrew. In my eyes, it is the most successful open source project in history in several aspects. I saw an interesting graph on Twitter a few days ago, which perfectly characterized the amazing community nature of Homebrew: Personally I don’t really care about if a project is “sticky”, and I believe being magnetic is a…

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Digital revolution in China: two visual takes

June 13, 2018
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Digital revolution in China: two visual takes

Kaiser Fung, founder of JunkCharts and Principal Analytics Prep, discusses a map in the Economist about the digital silk road in China. What's the story?

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Can somebody please untangle this one for us? Are centrists more, or less, supportive of democracy, compared to political extremists?

June 13, 2018
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Can somebody please untangle this one for us?  Are centrists more, or less, supportive of democracy, compared to political extremists?

OK, this is a nice juicy problem for a political science student . . . Act 1: “Centrists Are the Most Hostile to Democracy, Not Extremists” David Adler writes in the New York Times: My research suggests that across Europe and North America, centrists are the least supportive of democracy, the least committed to its […] The post Can somebody please untangle this one for us? Are centrists more, or…

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