“extremely damaging and slanderous blog article”

Yesterday was a first for the ‘Og in that my university legal department received a complaint from a company about one of the posts, that among other things was considered as an “offending” and “extremely damaging and slanderous commentary” on the services proposed by this company, including posting the unsolicited marketing email it has sent […]

Several reviews of Deborah Mayo’s new book, Statistical Inference as Severe Testing: How to Get Beyond the Statistics Wars

A few months ago I sent the following message to some people: Dear philosophically-inclined colleagues: I’d like to organize an online discussion of Deborah Mayo’s new book. The table of contents and some of the book are here at Google books, also in the attached pdf and in this post by Mayo. I think that […]

Active learning and decision making with varying treatment effects!

In a new paper, Iiris Sundin, Peter Schulam, Eero Siivola, Aki Vehtari, Suchi Saria, and Samuel Kaski write: Machine learning can help personalized decision support by learning models to predict individual treatment effects (ITE). This work studies the reliability of prediction-based decision-making in a task of deciding which action a to take for a target […]

dynamic nested sampling for stars

In the sequel of earlier nested sampling packages, like MultiNest, Joshua Speagle has written a new package called dynesty that manages dynamic nested sampling, primarily intended for astronomical applications. Which is the field where nested sampling is the most popular. One of the first remarks in the paper is that nested sampling can be more […]

Maybe you should’t script it after all

Programmers have an easier time scaling up than scaling down. You could call this foresight or over-engineering, depending on how things work out. Scaling is a matter of placing bets. Experienced programmers are rightfully suspicious of claims that something only needs to be done once, or that quick-and-dirty will be OK [*]. They’ve been burned […]

What sort of identification do you get from panel data if effects are long-term? Air pollution and cognition example.

Don MacLeod writes: Perhaps you know this study which is being taken at face value in all the secondary reports: “Air pollution causes ‘huge’ reduction in intelligence, study reveals.” It’s surely alarming, but the reported effect of air pollution seems implausibly large, so it’s hard to be convinced of it by a correlational study alone, […]

Gibbs clashes with importance sampling

In an X validated question, an interesting proposal was made: at each (component-wise) step of a Gibbs sampler, replace simulation from the exact full conditional with simulation from an alternate density and weight the resulting simulation with a term made of a product of (a) the previous weight (b) the ratio of the true conditional […]

What is the most important real-world data processing tip you’d like to share with others?

This question was in today’s jitts for our communication class. Here are some responses: Invest the time to learn data manipulation tools well (e.g. tidyverse). Increased familiarity with these tools often leads to greater time savings and less frustration in future. Hmm it’s never one tip.. I never ever found it useful to begin writing […]

Prestigious journal publishes sexy selfie study

Stephen Oliver writes: Not really worth blogging about and a likely candidate for multiverse analysis, but the beginning of the first sentence in the 2nd paragraph made me laugh: In the study – published in prestigious journal PNAS . . . The researchers get extra points for this quote from the press release: The researchers […]

aftermaths of retiring significance

Beyond mentions in the general press of the retire significance paper, as in Retraction Watch, Bloomberg, The Guardian, Vox, and NPR, not to mention the large number of comments on Andrew’s blog, and Deborah Mayo’s tribune on a ban on free speech (!), Nature of “the week after” contained three letters from Ioannidis, calling for […]

“How Sloppy Science Creates Worthless Cures, Crushes Hope, and Wastes Billions” . . . and still stays around even after it’s been retracted

Chuck Jackson points to two items of possible interest: Rigor Mortis: How Sloppy Science Creates Worthless Cures, Crushes Hope, and Wastes Billions, by Richard Harris. Review here by Leonard Freedman. Retractions do not work very well, by Ken Cor and Gaurav Sood. This post by Tyler Cowen brought this paper to my attention. Here’s a […]

deep and embarrassingly parallel MCMC

Diego Mesquita, Paul Blomstedt, and Samuel Kaski (from Helsinki, like the above picture) just arXived a paper on embarrassingly parallel MCMC. Following a series of papers discussed on this ‘og in the past. They use a deep learning approach of Dinh et al. (2017) to the computation of the probability density of a convoluted and […]

Taking the derivative of a muscle car

I’ve been getting a lot of spam lately saying my web site does not rank well on “certain keywords.” This is of course true: no web site ranks well for every keyword. I was joking about this on Twitter, saying that my site does not rank well for women’s shoes, muscle cars, or snails because […]

Safe Harbor and the calendar rollover problem

Data privacy is subtle and difficult to regulate. The lawmakers who wrote the HIPAA privacy regulations took a stab at what would protect privacy when they crafted the “Safe Harbor” list. The list is neither necessary or sufficient, depending on context, but it’s a start. Extreme values of any measurement are more likely to lead […]

Practical Data Science with R Book Update

A good friend shared with us a great picture of Practical Data Science with R, 1st Edition hanging out in Cambridge at the MIT Press Bookstore. This is as good an excuse as any to share a book update. Nina Zumel and I (John Mount) are busy revising chapters 10 and 11 of Practical Data … Continue reading Practical Data Science with R Book Update

Emile Bravo and agency

I was reading Tome 4 of the adventures of Jules (see the last item here), and it struck me how much agency the characters had. They seemed to be making their own decisions, saying what they wanted to say, etc. Just as a contrast, I’m also reading an old John Le Carre book, and here […]