Calling R from Scala sbt projects

January 24, 2015
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Calling R from Scala sbt projects

Overview In previous posts I’ve shown how the jvmr CRAN R package can be used to call Scala sbt projects from R and inline Scala Breeze code in R. In this post I will show how to call to R from a Scala sbt project. This requires that R and the jvmr CRAN R package […]

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“What then should we teach about hypothesis testing?”

January 24, 2015
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Someone who wishes to remain anonymous writes in: Last week, I was looking forward to a blog post titled “Why continue to teach and use hypothesis testing?” I presume that this scheduled post merely became preempted by more timely posts. But I am still interested in reading the exchange that will follow. My feeling is […] The post “What then should we teach about hypothesis testing?” appeared first on Statistical…

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RSS feeds for statistics and related journals

January 23, 2015
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RSS feeds for statistics and related journals

I’ve now resurrected the collection of research journals that I follow, and set it up as a shared collection in feedly. So anyone can easily subscribe to all of the same journals, or select a subset of them, to follow on feedly. There are about 90 journals on the list, mostly in statistics, but some from machine […]

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Assertive R programming in dplyr/magrittr pipelines

January 23, 2015
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Assertive R programming in dplyr/magrittr pipelines

A lot of my job–and side projects, for that matter–involve running R scripts on updates of open government data. While I’m infinitely grateful to have access to any interesting open datasets in the first place, I can’t ignore that dealing… Continue reading →

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How Optimizely will kill your winning percentage, and why that is a great thing for you (Part 1)

January 23, 2015
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In my HBR article about A/B testing (link), I described one of the key managerial problems related to A/B testing--the surplus of “positive” results that don’t quite seem to add up. In particular, I mentioned this issue: When managers are reading hour-by-hour results, they will sometimes find large gaps between Groups A and B, and demand prompt reaction. Almost all such fluctuations result from temporary imbalance between the two groups,…

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What’s the point of the margin of error?

January 23, 2015
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So . . . the scheduled debate on using margin of error with non-probability panels never happened. We got it started but there was some problem with the webinar software and nobody put the participants could hear anything. The 5 minutes of conversation we did have was pretty good, though. I was impressed. The webinar […] The post What’s the point of the margin of error? appeared first on Statistical…

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Link: Data Stories Podcast 2014 Review

January 22, 2015
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Episode 46 of the Data Stories podcast features Andy Kirk and yours truly in an epic battle for podcast dominance a review of the year 2014. This complements well my State of Information Visualization posting, and of course there is a bit of overlap (I wrote that posting after we recorded the episode – Moritz and Enrico are so slow). … Continue reading Link: Data Stories Podcast 2014 Review

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Patience and research

January 22, 2015
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I’m going to follow up on a recent post of Thomas Basbøll and argue that patience is an important, and I think under-appreciated, practice in research. This is an odd post for me to write because I’m usually not a patient person. In some ways, though, and surprising as it may sound, blogging is a […] The post Patience and research appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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Sequential Monte Carlo 2015 workshop

January 22, 2015
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Sequential Monte Carlo 2015 workshop

An announcement for the SMC 2015 workshop: Sequential Monte Carlo methods (also known as particle filters) have revolutionized the on-line and off-line analysis of data in fields as diverse as target tracking, computer vision, financial modelling, brain imagery, or population ecology. Their popularity stems from the fact that they have made possible to solve numerically many […]

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About replication bullies and scientific progress …

January 22, 2015
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These days psychology really is exciting, and I do not mean the Förster case … In May 2014 a special issue full of replication attempts has been released – all open access, all raw data released! This is great work, powered by the open sci...

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What is an empty matrix?

January 22, 2015
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What is an empty matrix?

At the beginning of my book Statistical Programming with SAS/IML Software I give the following programming tip (p. 25): Do not confuse an empty matrix with a matrix that contains missing values or with a zero matrix. An empty matrix has no rows and no columns. A matrix that contains […]

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Some statistical dirty laundry

January 22, 2015
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Some statistical dirty laundry

It’s an apt time to reblog the “statistical dirty laundry” post from 2013 here. I hope we can take up the recommendations from Simmons, Nelson and Simonsohn at the end (Note [5]), which we didn’t last time around. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ I finally had a chance to fully read the 2012 Tilberg Report* on “Flawed Science” last night. Here are […]

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Debate on using margin of error with non-probability panels

January 22, 2015
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Debate on using margin of error with non-probability panels

Tomorrow (Thurs 22 Jan) at 2pm, I’m participating (along with Jane Tang, John Bremer, Nancy Brigham, and Steve Mossup) on an online discussion, moderated by Annie Pettit, on the above topic. Here’s the description: Most marketing researchers know that using Margin of Error with convenience samples, non-probability samples, and online research panels is inappropriate. However, […] The post Debate on using margin of error with non-probability panels appeared first on…

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Data as an antidote to aggressive overconfidence

January 21, 2015
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A recent NY Times op-ed reminded us of the many biases faced by women at work. A followup op-ed  gave specific recommendations for how to conduct ourselves in meetings. In general, I found these very insightful, but don't necessarily agree with the recommendations that women should "Practice Assertive Body Language".  Instead, we should make an effort to judge

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Link: Data Viz Done Right

January 21, 2015
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Andy Kriebel’s Data Viz Done Right is a remarkable little website. He collects good examples of data visualization and talks about what works and what doesn’t. He does have bits of criticism sometimes, but he always has more positive than...

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High risk, low return

January 21, 2015
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This one is just too good not to share. I came across it via a link from Retraction Watch. Director of Paris journalism school suspended for plagiarism: Executive director of journalism school at Sciences-Po university suspended while the university investigates accusations she was plagiarising other people’s articles for columns in the Huffington Post . . […] The post High risk, low return appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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Boxes or lines: showing the trend in US adoptions

January 21, 2015
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Boxes or lines: showing the trend in US adoptions

Time used a pair of area charts (a form of treemap) to illustrate the trend in Americans adopting babies of foreign origin. The data consist of the number of babies labeled by country of birth in 1999 and in 2013....

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Plans for reboot of Statistical Communication class

January 21, 2015
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Plans for reboot of Statistical Communication class

At the end of my course on Statistical Communication and Graphics last semester, I enlisted some of the students to help plan for the new version of the course (which starts next week). I took a bunch of notes on the blackboard and then a student took pictures for me. I had the idea that […] The post Plans for reboot of Statistical Communication class appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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Github cheat sheet

January 21, 2015
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Mike Betancourt pointed us to this page. Maybe it will be useful to you too. The post Github cheat sheet appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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A bunch of papers

January 20, 2015
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A bunch of papers

The beginning of the new year has been particularly busy, as I'm working on several interesting projects. On the bright side, some of these are starting to give their fruits and, coincidentally, in the last few days we've had a few papers finalise...

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Microbiome Digest Blog

January 20, 2015
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Microbiome Digest Blog

I have a noteworthy blogs tag on this blog that I sort of forgot about, and haven't used in years. But I started reading one recently that's definitely qualified for the distinction.The Microbiome Digest is written by Elisabeth Bik, a scienti...

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Another benefit of bloglag

January 20, 2015
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In the classic Philip K. Dick novel, The World Jones Made, the main character has the ability to see the future, in particular he knows what will happen a year in the future, with this window moving forward relative to present time. Sounds cool, huh? But that’s not the character’s perception; instead: It’s not so […] The post Another benefit of bloglag appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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Gorging ourselves on "free" health care: Harvard’s dilemma

January 20, 2015
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Gorging ourselves on "free" health care: Harvard’s dilemma

Editor's note: This is a guest post by Laura Hatfield. Laura is an Assistant Professor of Health Care Policy at Harvard Medical School, with a specialty in Biostatistics. Her work focuses on understanding trade-offs and relationships among health outcomes. Dr. Hatfield received her BS in genetics from Iowa State University and her PhD in biostatistics from the University

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