Lines, gridlines, reference lines, regression lines, the works

April 16, 2018
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Lines, gridlines, reference lines, regression lines, the works

Kaiser Fung, creator of Junk Charts and Principal Analytics Prep, continues to discuss the Google Newslab project showing racial and gender diversity in U.S. newsroom.

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The History of Forecasting Competitions

April 16, 2018
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Check out Rob Hyndman's "Brief History of Time Series Forecasting Competitions". I'm not certain whether the title's parallel to Hawking's Brief History of Time is intentional. At any rate, even if Hyndman's focus is rather more narrow than the origin ...

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Random permutations without duplicates

April 16, 2018
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Random permutations without duplicates

A colleague and I recently discussed how to generate random permutations without encountering duplicates. Given a set of n items, there are n! permutations My colleague wants to generate k unique permutations at random from among the total of n!. Said differently, he wants to sample without replacement from the [...] The post Random permutations without duplicates appeared first on The DO Loop.

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Generable: They’re building software for pharma, with Stan inside.

April 15, 2018
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Daniel Lee writes: We’ve just launched our new website. Generable is where precision medicine meets statistical machine learning. We are building a state-of-the-art platform to make individual, patient-level predictions for safety and efficacy of treatments. We’re able to do this by building Bayesian models with Stan. We currently have pilots with AstraZeneca, Sanofi, and University […] The post Generable: They’re building software for pharma, with Stan inside. appeared first on…

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Fixing the reproducibility crisis: Openness, Increasing sample size, and Preregistration ARE NOT ENUF!!!!

April 15, 2018
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In a generally reasonable and thoughtful post, “Yes, Your Field Does Need to Worry About Replicability,” Rich Lucas writes: One of the most exciting things to happen during the years-long debate about the replicability of psychological research is the shift in focus from providing evidence that there is a problem to developing concrete plans for […] The post Fixing the reproducibility crisis: Openness, Increasing sample size, and Preregistration ARE NOT…

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Categorical Data Analysis

April 14, 2018
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Categorical Data Analysis

Categorical data analysis could mean a couple different things. One is analyzing data that falls into unordered categories (e.g. red, green, and blue) rather than numerical values (e..g. height in centimeters). Another is using category theory to assist with the analysis of data. Here “category” means something more sophisticated than a list of items you […]

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“Bit by Bit: Social Research in the Digital Age”

April 14, 2018
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Our longtime collaborator Matt Salganik sent me a copy of his new textbook, “Bit by Bit: Social Research in the Digital Age.” I really like the division into Observing Behavior, Asking Questions, Running Experiments, and Mass Collaboration (I’d remove the word “Creating” from the title of that section). It seemed awkward for Ethics to be […] The post “Bit by Bit: Social Research in the Digital Age” appeared first on…

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Books to Read While the Algae Grow in Your Fur, February 2017

April 14, 2018
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Attention conservation notice: I have no taste. Ben Aaronovitch, The Hanging Tree Continues the long-running series, and went by pleasantly, but I don't think it really advanced the plot very much. (Previously.) Jen Williams, The Iron Ghost Seq...

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Books to Read While the Algae Grow in Your Fur, April 2017

April 14, 2018
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Attention conservation notice: I have no taste. Jean d'Ormesson, The Glory of the Empire: A Novel, a History (translated by Barbara Bray) This must be one of the strangest and most brilliant of alternate histories, covering thousands of years in th...

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Books to Read While the Algae Grow in Your Fur, June 2017

April 14, 2018
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Attention conservation notice: I have no taste. Peter Frase, Four Futures: Life After Capitalism An expansion of his essay of the same name. This short book is very much worth reading if you like my blog at all. (Unless you're only here because y...

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Books to Read While the Algae Grow in Your Fur, January 2018

April 14, 2018
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Attention conservation notice: I have no taste. Maria Konnikova, The Confidence Game: And Why We Fall for It... Every Time An engaging popular-science look at confidence games, their players and their marks. (Konnikova references a lot of the soci...

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An _Ad Hominid_ Argument for Animism

April 14, 2018
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Attention conservation notice: Note the date. A straight-forward argument from widely-accepted premises of evolutionary psychology shows that humans evolved in an environment featuring invisible beings with minds and the ability to affect the materia...

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forecast v8.3 now on CRAN

forecast v8.3 now on CRAN

The latest version of the forecast package for R is now on CRAN. This is the version used in the 2nd edition of my forecasting textbook with George Athanasopoulos. So readers should now be able to replicate all examples in the book using only CRAN pack...

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It’s all about Hurricane Andrew: Do patterns in post-disaster donations demonstrate egotism?

April 13, 2018
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Jim Windle points to this post discussing a paper by Jesse Chandler, Tiffany M. Griffin, and Nicholas Sorensen, “In the ‘I’ of the Storm: Shared Initials Increase Disaster Donations.” I took a quick look and didn’t notice anything clearly wrong with the paper, but there did seem to be some opportunities for forking paths, in […] The post It’s all about Hurricane Andrew: Do patterns in post-disaster donations demonstrate egotism?…

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Well-structured, interactive graphic about newsrooms

April 13, 2018
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Well-structured, interactive graphic about newsrooms

Kaiser Fung, creator of Junk Charts and Principal Analytics Prep, looks at the details of a collaboration between Google Newslab and Alberto Cairo, on newsroom staff diversity.

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Major depression, qu’est-ce que c’est?

April 13, 2018
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Attention conservation notice: 1100+ words on a speculative scientific paper, proposing yet another reformation of psychopathology. The post contains equations and amateur philosophy of science. Reading it will not make you feel better. — Lar...

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cdata Update

April 12, 2018
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cdata Update

The R package cdata now has version 0.7.0 available from CRAN. cdata is a data manipulation package that subsumes many higher order data manipulation operations including pivot/un-pivot, spread/gather, or cast/melt. The record to record transforms are specified by drawing a table that expresses the record structure (called the “control table” and also the link between … Continue reading cdata Update

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Tools for detecting junk science? Transparency is the key.

April 12, 2018
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Tools for detecting junk science?  Transparency is the key.

In an article to appear in the journal Child Development, “Distinguishing polemic from commentary in science,” physicist David Grimes and psychologist Dorothy Bishop write: Exposure to nonionizing radiation used in wireless communication remains a contentious topic in the public mind—while the overwhelming scientific evidence to date suggests that microwave and radio frequencies used in modern […] The post Tools for detecting junk science? Transparency is the key. appeared first on…

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Do Statistical Methods Have an Expiration Date? (my talk noon Mon 16 Apr at the University of Pennsylvania)

April 12, 2018
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Do Statistical Methods Have an Expiration Date? Andrew Gelman, Department of Statistics and Department of Political Science, Columbia University There is a statistical crisis in the human sciences: many celebrated findings have failed to replicate, and careful analysis has revealed that many celebrated research projects were dead on arrival in the sense of never having […] The post Do Statistical Methods Have an Expiration Date? (my talk noon Mon 16…

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Neglected R Super Functions

April 11, 2018
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Neglected R Super Functions

R has a lot of under-appreciated super powerful functions. I list a few of our favorites below. Atlas, carrying the sky. Royal Palace (Paleis op de Dam), Amsterdam. Photo: Dominik Bartsch, CC some rights reserved. stats::approx(): approximate a curve/function. base::cumsum(): cumulative ordered sum. stats::ecdf(): estimate the cumulative distribution function. base::findInterval(): assign values to bins. base::match(): … Continue reading Neglected R Super Functions

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Failure of failure to replicate

April 11, 2018
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Failure of failure to replicate

Dan Kahan tells this story: Too much here to digest probably, but the common theme is—what if people start saying their work “replicates” or “fails to replicate” when the studies in question are massively underpowered &/or have significantly different design (& sample) from target study? 1. Kahan after discovering that authors claim my study “failed […] The post Failure of failure to replicate appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Find the unique rows of a numeric matrix

April 11, 2018
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Find the unique rows of a numeric matrix

Sometimes it is important to ensure that a matrix has unique rows. When the data are all numeric, there is an easy way to detect (and delete!) duplicate rows in a matrix. The main idea is to subtract one row from another. Start with the first row and subtract it [...] The post Find the unique rows of a numeric matrix appeared first on The DO Loop.

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The Millennium Villages Project: a retrospective, observational, endline evaluation

April 11, 2018
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Shira Mitchell et al. write (preprint version here if that link doesn’t work): The Millennium Villages Project (MVP) was a 10 year, multisector, rural development project, initiated in 2005, operating across ten sites in ten sub-Saharan African countries to achieve the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). . . . In this endline evaluation of the MVP, […] The post The Millennium Villages Project: a retrospective, observational, endline evaluation appeared first on…

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