Category: ASA Guide to P-values

“The 2019 ASA Guide to P-values and Statistical Significance: Don’t Say What You Don’t Mean” (Some Recommendations)

Some have asked me why I haven’t blogged on the recent follow-up to the ASA Statement on P-Values and Statistical Significance (Wasserstein and Lazar 2016)–hereafter, ASA I. They’re referring to the editorial by Wasserstein, R., Schirm, A. and Lazar, N. (2019) –hereafter, ASA II–opening a special on-line issue of over 40 contributions responding to the […]

If you like Neyman’s confidence intervals then you like N-P tests

Neyman, confronted with unfortunate news would always say “too bad!” At the end of Jerzy Neyman’s birthday week, I cannot help imagining him saying “too bad!” as regards some twists and turns in the statistics wars. First, too bad Neyman-Pearson (N-P) tests aren’t in the ASA Statement (2016) on P-values: “To keep the statement reasonably […]

If you like Neyman’s confidence intervals then you like N-P tests

Neyman, confronted with unfortunate news would always say “too bad!” At the end of Jerzy Neyman’s birthday week, I cannot help imagining him saying “too bad!” as regards some twists and turns in the statistics wars. First, too bad Neyman-Pearson (N-P) tests aren’t in the ASA Statement (2016) on P-values: “To keep the statement reasonably […]

Diary For Statistical War Correspondents on the Latest Ban on Speech

When science writers, especially “statistical war correspondents”, contact you to weigh in on some article, they may talk to you until they get something spicy, and then they may or may not include the background context. So a few writers contacted me this past week regarding this article (“Retire Statistical Significance”)–a teaser, I now suppose, […]