Category: Sociology

“Suppose that you work in a restaurant…”

In relation to yesterday’s post on Monty Hall, Josh Miller sends along this paper coauthored with the ubiquitous Adam Sanjurjo, “A Bridge from Monty Hall to the Hot Hand: The Principle of Restricted Choice,” which begins: Suppose that you work in a restaurant where two regular customers, Ann and Bob, are equally likely to come […]

“Statistical Inference Enables Bad Science; Statistical Thinking Enables Good Science”

As promised, let’s continue yesterday’s discussion of Christopher Tong’s article, “Statistical Inference Enables Bad Science; Statistical Thinking Enables Good Science.” First, the title, which makes an excellent point. It can be valuable to think about measurement, comparison, and variation, even if commonly-used statistical methods can mislead. This reminds me of the idea in decision analysis […]

Harking, Sharking, Tharking

Bert Gunter writes: You may already have seen this [“Harking, Sharking, and Tharking: Making the Case for Post Hoc Analysis of Scientific Data,” John Hollenbeck, Patrick Wright]. It discusses many of the same themes that you and others have highlighted in the special American Statistician issue and elsewhere, but does so from a slightly different […]

“Superior: The Return of Race Science,” by Angela Saini

“People so much wanted the story to be true . . . that they couldn’t look past it to more mundane explanations.” – Angela Saini, Superior. I happened to be reading this book around the same time as I attended the Metascience conference, which was motivated by the realization during the past decade or so […]

A world of Wansinks in medical research: “So I guess what I’m trying to get at is I wonder how common it is for clinicians to rely on med students to do their data analysis for them, and how often this work then gets published”

In the context of a conversation regarding sloppy research practices, Jordan Anaya writes: It reminds me of my friends in residency. Basically, while they were med students for some reason clinicians decided to get them to analyze data in their spare time. I’m not saying my friends are stupid, but they have no stats or […]

It’s not just p=0.048 vs. p=0.052

Peter Dorman points to this post on statistical significance and p-values by Timothy Taylor, editor of the Journal of Economic Perspectives, a highly influential publication of the American Economic Association. I have some problems with what Taylor writes, but for now I’ll just take it as representing a certain view, the perspective of a thoughtful […]

Is the effect they found too large to believe? (the effect of breakfast micronutrients on social decisions)

Someone who wishes to remain anonymous writes: Have you seen this paper? I [my correspondent] don’t see any obvious problems, but the results fall into the typical social psychology case “unbelievably large effects of small manipulations”. They even say so themselves: We provided converging evidence from two studies showing that a relatively small variation in […]

Amending Conquest’s Law to account for selection bias

Robert Conquest was a historian who published critical studies of the Soviet Union and whose famous “First Law” is, “Everybody is reactionary on subjects he knows about.” I did some searching on the internet, and the most authoritative source seems to be this quote from Conquest’s friend Kingsley Amis: Further search led to this elaboration […]

“Study finds ‘Growth Mindset’ intervention taking less than an hour raises grades for ninth graders”

I received this press release in the mail: Study finds ‘Growth Mindset’ intervention taking less than an hour raises grades for ninth graders Intervention is first to show national applicability, breaks new methodological ground – Study finds low-cost, online growth mindset program taking less than an hour can improve ninth graders’ academic achievement – The […]

Are supercentenarians mostly superfrauds?

Ethan Steinberg points to a new article by Saul Justin Newman with the wonderfully descriptive title, “Supercentenarians and the oldest-old are concentrated into regions with no birth certificates and short lifespans,” which begins: The observation of individuals attaining remarkable ages, and their concentration into geographic sub-regions or ‘blue zones’, has generated considerable scientific interest. Proposed […]

Pre-results review: Some results

Aleks Bogdanoski writes: I’m writing from the Berkeley Initiative for Transparency in the Social Sciences (BITSS) at UC Berkeley with news about pre-results review, a novel form of peer review where journals review (and accept) research papers based on their methods and theory — before any results are known. Pre-results review is motivated by growing […]

Update on keeping Mechanical Turk responses trustworthy

This topic has come up before . . . Now there’s a new paper by Douglas Ahler, Carolyn Roush, and Gaurav Sood, who write: Amazon’s Mechanical Turk has rejuvenated the social sciences, dramatically reducing the cost and inconvenience of collecting original data. Recently, however, researchers have raised concerns about the presence of “non-respondents” (bots) or […]