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The Paradox of Replication, and the vindication of the P-value (but she can go deeper) 9/2/15 update (ii)

September 1, 2015
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The Paradox of Replication, and the vindication of the P-value (but she can go deeper) 9/2/15 update (ii)

The Paradox of Replication Critic 1: It’s much too easy to get small P-values. Critic 2: We find it very difficult to get small P-values; only 36 of 100 psychology experiments were found to yield small P-values in the recent Open Science collaboration on replication (in psychology). Is it easy or is it hard? You might say, […]

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3 YEARS AGO (AUGUST 2012): MEMORY LANE

August 24, 2015
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3 YEARS AGO (AUGUST 2012): MEMORY LANE

3 years ago… MONTHLY MEMORY LANE: 3 years ago: August 2012. I mark in red three posts that seem most apt for general background on key issues in this blog.[1] Posts that are part of a “unit” or a group of “U-Phils” count as one (there are 4 U-Phils on Wasserman this time). Monthly memory lanes began at the blog’s 3-year anniversary in Sept, […]

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How to avoid making mountains out of molehills, using power/severity

August 21, 2015
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How to avoid making mountains out of molehills, using power/severity

A classic fallacy of rejection is taking a statistically significant result as evidence of a discrepancy from a test (or null) hypothesis larger than is warranted. Standard tests do have resources to combat this fallacy, but you won’t see them in textbook formulations. It’s not new statistical method, but new (and correct) interpretations of existing methods, that are needed. One […]

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Statistics, the Spooky Science

August 19, 2015
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Statistics, the Spooky Science

I was reading this interview Of Erich Lehmann yesterday: “A Conversation with Erich L. Lehmann” Lehmann: …I read over and over again that hypothesis testing is dead as a door nail, that nobody does hypothesis testing. I talk to Julie and she says that in the behaviorial sciences, hypothesis testing is what they do the […]

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A. Spanos: Egon Pearson’s Neglected Contributions to Statistics

August 11, 2015
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A. Spanos: Egon Pearson’s Neglected Contributions to Statistics

Today is Egon Pearson’s birthday. I reblog a post by my colleague Aris Spanos from (8/18/12): “Egon Pearson’s Neglected Contributions to Statistics.”  Happy Birthday Egon Pearson!     Egon Pearson (11 August 1895 – 12 June 1980), is widely known today for his contribution in recasting of Fisher’s significance testing into the Neyman-Pearson (1933) theory of hypothesis testing. Occasionally, he […]

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Statistical Theater of the Absurd: “Stat on a Hot Tin Roof”

August 9, 2015
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Statistical Theater of the Absurd: “Stat on a Hot Tin Roof”

Memory lane: Did you ever consider how some of the colorful exchanges among better-known names in statistical foundations could be the basis for high literary drama in the form of one-act plays (even if appreciated by only 3-7 people in the world)? (Think of the expressionist exchange between Bohr and Heisenberg in Michael Frayn’s play […]

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Neyman: Distinguishing tests of statistical hypotheses and tests of significance might have been a lapse of someone’s pen

August 5, 2015
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Neyman: Distinguishing tests of statistical hypotheses and tests of significance might have been a lapse of someone’s pen

“Tests of Statistical Hypotheses and Their Use in Studies of Natural Phenomena” by Jerzy Neyman ABSTRACT. Contrary to ideas suggested by the title of the conference at which the present paper was presented, the author is not aware of a conceptual difference between a “test of a statistical hypothesis” and a “test of significance” and uses […]

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Telling What’s True About Power, if practicing within the error-statistical tribe

July 29, 2015
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Telling What’s True About Power, if practicing within the error-statistical tribe

Suppose you are reading about a statistically significant result x (at level α) from a one-sided test T+ of the mean of a Normal distribution with n iid samples, and (for simplicity) known σ:   H0: µ ≤  0 against H1: µ >  0.  I have heard some people say [0]: A. If the test’s power to detect alternative µ’ is very low, then […]

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Stephen Senn: Randomization, ratios and rationality: rescuing the randomized clinical trial from its critics

July 24, 2015
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Stephen Senn: Randomization, ratios and rationality: rescuing the randomized clinical trial from its critics

Stephen Senn Head of Competence Center for Methodology and Statistics (CCMS) Luxembourg Institute of Health This post first appeared here. An issue sometimes raised about randomized clinical trials is the problem of indefinitely many confounders. This, for example is what John Worrall has to say: Even if there is only a small probability that an individual factor is […]

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3 YEARS AGO (JULY 2012): MEMORY LANE

July 23, 2015
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3 YEARS AGO (JULY 2012): MEMORY LANE

3 years ago… MONTHLY MEMORY LANE: 3 years ago: July 2012. I mark in red three posts that seem most apt for general background on key issues in this blog.[1]  This new feature, appearing the last week of each month, began at the blog’s 3-year anniversary in Sept, 2014. (Once again it was tough to pick just 3; please check out others which might […]

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