Blog Archives

“Statistical Concepts in Their Relation to Reality” by E.S. Pearson

April 24, 2015
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“Statistical Concepts in Their Relation to Reality” by E.S. Pearson

To complete the last post, here’s Pearson’s portion of the “triad”  “Statistical Concepts in Their Relation to Reality” by E.S. PEARSON (1955) SUMMARY: This paper contains a reply to some criticisms made by Sir Ronald Fisher in his recent article on “Scientific Methods and Scientific Induction”. Controversies in the field of mathematical statistics seem largely […]

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NEYMAN: “Note on an Article by Sir Ronald Fisher” (3 uses for power, Fisher’s fiducial argument)

April 22, 2015
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NEYMAN: “Note on an Article by Sir Ronald Fisher” (3 uses for power, Fisher’s fiducial argument)

Note on an Article by Sir Ronald Fisher By Jerzy Neyman (1956) Summary (1) FISHER’S allegation that, contrary to some passages in the introduction and on the cover of the book by Wald, this book does not really deal with experimental design is unfounded. In actual fact, the book is permeated with problems of experimentation.  […]

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Neyman: Distinguishing tests of statistical hypotheses and tests of significance might have been a lapse of someone’s pen

April 18, 2015
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Neyman: Distinguishing tests of statistical hypotheses and tests of significance might have been a lapse of someone’s pen

“Tests of Statistical Hypotheses and Their Use in Studies of Natural Phenomena” by Jerzy Neyman ABSTRACT. Contrary to ideas suggested by the title of the conference at which the present paper was presented, the author is not aware of a conceptual difference between a “test of a statistical hypothesis” and a “test of significance” and uses […]

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A. Spanos: Jerzy Neyman and his Enduring Legacy

April 16, 2015
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A. Spanos: Jerzy Neyman and his Enduring Legacy

A Statistical Model as a Chance Mechanism Aris Spanos  Today is the birthday of Jerzy Neyman (April 16, 1894 – August 5, 1981). Neyman was a Polish/American statistician[i] who spent most of his professional career at the University of California, Berkeley. Neyman is best known in statistics for his pioneering contributions in framing the Neyman-Pearson (N-P) […]

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Philosophy of Statistics Comes to the Big Apple! APS 2015 Annual Convention — NYC

April 14, 2015
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Philosophy of Statistics Comes to the Big Apple! APS 2015 Annual Convention — NYC

Start Spreading the News…..  The Philosophy of Statistics: Bayesianism, Frequentism and the Nature of Inference, 2015 APS Annual Convention Saturday, May 23  2:00 PM- 3:50 PM in Wilder (Marriott Marquis 1535 B’way)     Andrew Gelman Professor of Statistics & Political Science Columbia University Stephen Senn Head of Competence Center for Methodology and Statistics (CCMS) […]

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Heads I win, tails you lose? Meehl and many Popperians get this wrong (about severe tests)!

April 9, 2015
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Heads I win, tails you lose? Meehl and many Popperians get this wrong (about severe tests)!

[T]he impressive thing about the 1919 tests of Einstein ‘s theory of gravity] is the risk involved in a prediction of this kind. If observation shows that the predicted effect is definitely absent, then the theory is simply refuted. The theory is incompatible with certain possible results of observation—in fact with results which everybody before […]

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Joan Clarke, Turing, I.J. Good, and “that after-dinner comedy hour…”

April 5, 2015
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Joan Clarke, Turing, I.J. Good, and “that after-dinner comedy hour…”

I finally saw The Imitation Game about Alan Turing and code-breaking at Bletchley Park during WWII. This short clip of Joan Clarke, who was engaged to Turing, includes my late colleague I.J. Good at the end (he’s not second as the clip lists him). Good used to talk a great deal about Bletchley Park and […]

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Are scientists really ready for ‘retraction offsets’ to advance ‘aggregate reproducibility’? (let alone ‘precautionary withdrawals’)

April 1, 2015
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Are scientists really ready for ‘retraction offsets’ to advance ‘aggregate reproducibility’? (let alone ‘precautionary withdrawals’)

Given recent evidence of the irreproducibility of a surprising number of published scientific findings, the White House’s Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) sought ideas for “leveraging its role as a significant funder of scientific research to most effectively address the problem”, and announced funding for projects to “reset the self-corrective process of scientific […]

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Your (very own) personalized genomic prediction varies depending on who else was around?

March 29, 2015
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Your (very own) personalized genomic prediction varies depending on who else was around?

As if I wasn’t skeptical enough about personalized predictions based on genomic signatures, Jeff Leek recently had a surprising post about a “A surprisingly tricky issue when using genomic signatures for personalized medicine“.  Leek (on his blog Simply Statistics) writes: My student Prasad Patil has a really nice paper that just came out in Bioinformatics (preprint in case paywalled). […]

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Objectivity in Statistics: “Arguments From Discretion and 3 Reactions”

March 21, 2015
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Objectivity in Statistics:  “Arguments From Discretion and 3 Reactions”

We constantly hear that procedures of inference are inescapably subjective because of the latitude of human judgment as it bears on the collection, modeling, and interpretation of data. But this is seriously equivocal: Being the product of a human subject is hardly the same as being subjective, at least not in the sense we are […]

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