Blog Archives

Er, about those “other statistical approaches”: Hold off until a balanced critique is in?

April 1, 2016
By
Er, about those “other statistical approaches”: Hold off until a balanced critique is in?

I could have told them that the degree of accordance enabling the “6 principles” on p-values was unlikely to be replicated when it came to most of the “other approaches” with which some would supplement or replace significance tests– notably Bayesian updating, Bayes factors, or likelihood ratios (confidence intervals are dual to hypotheses tests). [My commentary […]

Read more »

A. Spanos: Talking back to the critics using error statistics

March 26, 2016
By
A. Spanos: Talking back to the critics using error statistics

Given all the recent attention given to kvetching about significance tests, it’s an apt time to reblog Aris Spanos’ overview of the error statistician talking back to the critics [1]. A related paper for your Saturday night reading is Mayo and Spanos (2011).[2] It mixes the error statistical philosophy of science with its philosophy of statistics, introduces severity, […]

Read more »

All She Wrote (so far): Error Statistics Philosophy: 4.5 years on

March 22, 2016
By
All She Wrote (so far): Error Statistics Philosophy: 4.5 years on

Error Statistics Philosophy: Blog Contents (4.5 years) By: D. G. Mayo [i] Dear Reader: It’s hard to believe I’ve been blogging for 4 and a half  years (since Sept. 3, 2011)! A big celebration is taking place at the Elbar Room as I type this. Please peruse the offerings below, and take advantage of some of the […]

Read more »

Your chance to continue the “due to chance” discussion in roomier quarters

March 19, 2016
By
Your chance to continue the “due to chance” discussion in roomier quarters

Comments get unwieldy after 100, so here’s a chance to continue the “due to chance” discussion in some roomier quarters. (There seems to be at least two distinct lanes being travelled.) Now one of the main reasons I run this blog is to discover potential clues to solving or making progress on thorny philosophical problems I’ve been wrangling with for a […]

Read more »

“A small p-value indicates it’s improbable that the results are due to chance alone” –fallacious or not? (more on the ASA p-value doc)

March 12, 2016
By
“A small p-value indicates it’s improbable that the results are due to chance alone” –fallacious or not? (more on the ASA p-value doc)

There’s something about “Principle 2” in the ASA document on p-values that I couldn’t address in my brief commentary, but is worth examining more closely. 2. P-values do not measure (a) the probability that the studied hypothesis is true , or (b) the probability that the data were produced  by random chance alone, (a) is true, […]

Read more »

Don’t throw out the error control baby with the bad statistics bathwater

March 7, 2016
By
Don’t throw out the error control baby with the bad statistics bathwater

My invited comments on the ASA Document on P-values* The American Statistical Association is to be credited with opening up a discussion into p-values; now an examination of the foundations of other key statistical concepts is needed. Statistical significance tests are a small part of a rich set of “techniques for systematically appraising and bounding […]

Read more »

Repligate Returns (or, the non-significance of non-significant results, are the new significant results)

March 4, 2016
By
Repligate Returns (or, the non-significance of non-significant results, are the new significant results)

Remember “Repligate”? [“Some Ironies in the Replication Crisis in Social Psychology“] and, more recently, the much publicized attempt to replicate 100 published psychology articles by the Open Science Collaboration (OSC) [“The Paradox of Replication“]? Well, some of the critics involved in Repligate have just come out with a criticism of the OSC results, claiming they’re […]

Read more »

Statistical Challenges in Assessing and Fostering the Reproducibility of Scientific Results

March 1, 2016
By
Statistical Challenges in Assessing and Fostering the Reproducibility of Scientific Results

Statistical Challenges in Assessing and Fostering the Reproducibility of Scientific Results I generally find National Academy of Science (NAS) manifestos highly informative. I only gave a quick reading to around 3/4 of this one. I thank Hilda Bastian for twittering the link. Before giving my impressions, I’m interested to hear what readers think, whenever you get around to having a […]

Read more »

3 YEARS AGO (FEBRUARY 2013): MEMORY LANE

February 27, 2016
By
3 YEARS AGO (FEBRUARY 2013): MEMORY LANE

MONTHLY MEMORY LANE: 3 years ago: February 2013. I mark in red three posts that seem most apt for general background on key issues in this blog [1]. Posts that are part of a “unit” or a group of “U-Phils”(you [readers] philosophize) count as one. Feb. 2013 reminds me how much the issue of the Likelihood Principle figured […]

Read more »

Deconstructing the Fisher-Neyman conflict wearing fiducial glasses (continued)

February 20, 2016
By
Deconstructing the Fisher-Neyman conflict wearing fiducial glasses (continued)

This continues my previous post: “Can’t take the fiducial out of Fisher…” in recognition of Fisher’s birthday, February 17. I supply a few more intriguing articles you may find enlightening to read and/or reread on a Saturday night Move up 20 years to the famous 1955/56 exchange between Fisher and Neyman. Fisher clearly connects Neyman’s adoption of […]

Read more »


Subscribe

Email:

  Subscribe