Category: Zombies

Niall Ferguson and the perils of playing to your audience

History professor Niall Ferguson had another case of the sillies. Back in 2012, in response to Stephen Marche’s suggestion that Ferguson was serving up political hackery because “he has to please corporations and high-net-worth individuals, the people who can pay 50 to 75K to hear him talk,” I wrote: But I don’t think it’s just […]

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These 3 problems destroy many clinical trials (in context of some papers on problems with non-inferiority trials, or problems with clinical trials in general)

Paul Alper points to this news article in Health News Review, which says: A news release or story that proclaims a new treatment is “just as effective” or “comparable to” or “as good as” an existing therapy might spring from a non-inferiority trial. Technically speaking, these studies are designed to test whether an intervention is […]

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“Using numbers to replace judgment”

Julian Marewski and Lutz Bornmann write: In science and beyond, numbers are omnipresent when it comes to justifying different kinds of judgments. Which scientific author, hiring committee-member, or advisory board panelist has not been confronted with page-long “publication manuals”, “assessment reports”, “evaluation guidelines”, calling for p-values, citation rates, h-indices, or other statistics in order to […]

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Robustness checks are a joke

Someone pointed to this post from a couple years ago by Uri Simonsohn, who correctly wrote: Robustness checks involve reporting alternative specifications that test the same hypothesis. Because the problem is with the hypothesis, the problem is not addressed with robustness checks. Simonsohn followed up with an amusing story: To demonstrate the problem I [Simonsohn] […]

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Chocolate milk! Another stunning discovery from an experiment on 24 people!

Mike Hull writes: I was reading over this JAMA Brief Report and could not figure out what they were doing with the composite score. Here are the cliff notes: Study tested milk vs dark chocolate consumption on three eyesight performance parameters: (1) High-contrast visual acuity (2) Small-letter contrast sensitivity (3) Large-letter contrast sensitivity Only small-letter […]

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“Recapping the recent plagiarism scandal”

Benjamin Carlisle writes: A year ago, I received a message from Anna Powell-Smith about a research paper written by two doctors from Cambridge University that was a mirror image of a post I wrote on my personal blog roughly two years prior. The structure of the document was the same, as was the rationale, the […]

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The purported CSI effect and the retroactive precision fallacy

Regarding our recent post on the syllogism that ate science, someone points us to this article, “The CSI Effect: Popular Fiction About Forensic Science Affects Public Expectations About Real Forensic Science,” by N. J. Schweitzer and Michael J. Saks. We’ll get to the CSI Effect in a bit, but first I want to share the […]

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Cornell prof (but not the pizzagate guy!) has one quick trick to getting 1700 peer reviewed publications on your CV

From the university webpage: Robert J. Sternberg is Professor of Human Development in the College of Human Ecology at Cornell University. . . . Sternberg is the author of over 1700 refereed publications. . . . How did he compile over 1700 refereed publications? Nick Brown tells the story: I [Brown] was recently contacted by […]

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