Blog Archives

Tali Sharot responds to my comments on a recent op-ed

May 27, 2018
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Yesterday I posted some comments on an op-ed by by Tali Sharot and Cass Sunstein. Sharot sent the following response: I wanted to correct a few inaccuracies, which two of your commenters were quick to catch (Jeff and Dale). It seems you have 3 objections 1. “Participants did not learn about others’ opinions. There were […] The post Tali Sharot responds to my comments on a recent op-ed appeared first…

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Three-warned is three-armed

May 27, 2018
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Simon Gates writes: Here is a paper just published in JAMA, on correction for multiple testing, and the clinical trial it refers to (also, I’ve just noticed, relevant to yesterday’s post [this one, I think. — AG]). This sort of sequential testing (and non-testing) is quite common, for example in three-armed trials (not saying I […] The post Three-warned is three-armed appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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Comment of the year

May 27, 2018
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From Jeff: “The decision to use mice for that study was terrible.” “Yeah, I know—and such small samples!” Sure, it’s only May. But I don’t think we’ll see anything better for awhile, so I’m happy to give out the a...

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X spotted in L’Aimant, par Lucas Harari

May 26, 2018
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I have a long post in preparation with lots of B.D. reviews, but in the meantime I wanted to flag this one right now because (a) the book was excellent, with a solid story and beautiful art and design, and (b) one of the characters looks just like Christian Robert, in an appropriate mountainous setting. […] The post X spotted in L’Aimant, par Lucas Harari appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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Click here to find out how these 2 top researchers hyped their work in a NYT op-ed!

May 26, 2018
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Gur Huberman pointed me to this NYT op-ed entitled “Would You Go to a Republican Doctor?”, written by two professors describing their own research, that begins as follows: Suppose you need to see a dermatologist. Your friend recommends a doctor, explaining that “she trained at the best hospital in the country and is regarded as […] The post Click here to find out how these 2 top researchers hyped their…

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Write your congressmember to require researchers to publicly post their code?

May 25, 2018
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Stephen Cranney writes: For the past couple of years I have had an ongoing question/concern . . . In my fields (sociology and demography) much if not most of the published research is based on publicly available datasets; consequently, replicability is literally a simple matter of sending or uploading a few kilobytes of code text. […] The post Write your congressmember to require researchers to publicly post their code? appeared…

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Stan on TV

May 24, 2018
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For reals. Billions, Season 3, Episode 9 35:10. The post Stan on TV appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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“I admire the authors for simply admitting they made an error and stating clearly and without equivocation that their original conclusions were not substantiated.”

May 24, 2018
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David Allison writes: I hope you will consider covering this in your blog. I admire the authors for simply admitting they made an error and stating clearly and without equivocation that their original conclusions were not substantiated. More attention to the confusing effects of regression to the mean are warranted as is more praise for […] The post “I admire the authors for simply admitting they made an error and…

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The anthropic principle in statistics

May 23, 2018
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The anthropic principle in physics states that we can derive certain properties of the world, or even the universe, based on the knowledge of our existence. The earth can’t be too hot or too cold, there needs to be oxygen and water, etc., which in turn implies certain things about our solar system, and so […] The post The anthropic principle in statistics appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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David Bellos’s book on translation

May 23, 2018
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Seeing as linguistics is on the agenda, I thought I’d mention this excellent book I just finished, “Is That a Fish in Your Ear,” by David Bellos. Bellos is a translator and scholar of French literature, and in his book he covers all sorts of topics. Nothing deep, but, as a non-expert on the topic, […] The post David Bellos’s book on translation appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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