Blog Archives

What do you do to visualize uncertainty?

September 17, 2014
By

Howard Wainer writes: What do you do to visualize uncertainty? Do you only use static methods (e.g. error bounds)? Or do you also make use of dynamic means (e.g. have the display vary over time proportional to the error, so you don’t know exactly where the top of the bar is, since it moves while […] The post What do you do to visualize uncertainty? appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

Read more »

They know my email but they don’t know me

September 16, 2014
By

This came (unsolicited) in the inbox today (actually, two months ago; we’re on a delay, as you’re probably aware), subject line “From PWC – animations of CEO opinions for 2014″: Good afternoon, I wanted to see if the data my colleague David sent to you was of any interest. I have attached here additional animated […] The post They know my email but they don’t know me appeared first on…

Read more »

More bad news for the buggy-whip manufacturers

September 15, 2014
By
More bad news for the buggy-whip manufacturers

In a news article regarding difficulties in using panel surveys to measure the unemployment rate, David Leonhardt writes: The main factor is technology. It’s a major cause of today’s response-rate problems – but it’s also the solution. For decades, survey research has revolved around the telephone, and it’s worked very well. But Americans’ relationship with […] The post More bad news for the buggy-whip manufacturers appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

Read more »

On deck this week

September 15, 2014
By

Mon: More bad news for the buggy-whip manufacturers Tues: They know my email but they don’t know me Wed: What do you do to visualize uncertainty? Thurs: Sokal: “science is not merely a bag of clever tricks . . . Rather, the natural sciences are nothing more or less than one particular application — albeit […] The post On deck this week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

Read more »

Six quotes from Kaiser Fung

September 14, 2014
By

You may think you have all of the data. You don’t. One of the biggest myth of Big Data is that data alone produce complete answers. Their “data” have done no arguing; it is the humans who are making this claim. Before getting into the methodological issues, one needs to ask the most basic question. […] The post Six quotes from Kaiser Fung appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

Read more »

He just ordered a translation from Diederik Stapel

September 13, 2014
By
He just ordered a translation from Diederik Stapel

Fernando Martel Garcia writes: So I am applying for a DC driver’s license and needed a translation of my Spanish license to show to the DMV. I go to http://www.onehourtranslation.com/ and as I prepare to pay I see a familiar face in the bottom banner: It appears Stapel is one of their “over 15,000 dedicated […] The post He just ordered a translation from Diederik Stapel appeared first on Statistical…

Read more »

What is the purpose of a poem?

September 12, 2014
By

OK, let’s take a break from blogging about economics. OK, I haven’t actually been blogging so much about econ lately, but it just happens that I’m writing this on 19 July, a day after poking a stick into the hornet’s nest by posting “Differences between econometrics and statistics: From varying treatment effects to utilities, economists […] The post What is the purpose of a poem? appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

Read more »

One-tailed or two-tailed

September 11, 2014
By
One-tailed or two-tailed

This image of a two-tailed lizard (from here, I can’t find the name of the person who took the picture) never fails to amuse me. But let us get to the question at hand . . . Richard Rasiej writes: I’m currently teaching a summer session course in Elementary Statistics. The text that I was […] The post One-tailed or two-tailed appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

Read more »

“It’s as if you went into a bathroom in a bar and saw a guy pissing on his shoes, and instead of thinking he has some problem with his aim, you suppose he has a positive utility for getting his shoes wet”

September 10, 2014
By
“It’s as if you went into a bathroom in a bar and saw a guy pissing on his shoes, and instead of thinking he has some problem with his aim, you suppose he has a positive utility for getting his shoes wet”

The notion of a geocentric universe has come under criticism from Copernican astronomy. . . . A couple months ago in a discussion of differences between econometrics and statistics, I alluded to the well-known fact that everyday uncertainty aversion can’t be explained by a declining marginal utility of money. What really bothers me—it’s been bothering […] The post “It’s as if you went into a bathroom in a bar and…

Read more »

Suspiciously vague graph purporting to show “percentage of slaves or serfs in the world”

September 9, 2014
By
Suspiciously vague graph purporting to show “percentage of slaves or serfs in the world”

Phillip Middleton sent this along, it’s from Peter Diamandis, who is best known for his X Prize, the “global leader in the creation of incentivized prize competitions.” Diamandis wrote: Phillip Middleton, Is technology making you work harder? Or giving you more time off? Seriously, it feels like it’s enabling me to work around the clock! […] The post Suspiciously vague graph purporting to show “percentage of slaves or serfs in…

Read more »


Subscribe

Email:

  Subscribe