Blog Archives

Friedrich Nietzsche (4) vs. Alan Bennett

February 28, 2015
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William Shakespeare had the most support yesterday; for example, from David: “I vote for Shakespeare just to see who actually shows up.” The best argument of the serious variety came from Babar, who wrote, “I would vote for WS. Very little is known about the man. I care very little about Marx’s mannerisms but I’d […] The post Friedrich Nietzsche (4) vs. Alan Bennett appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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Bertrand Russell goes to the IRB

February 28, 2015
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Jonathan Falk points me to this genius idea from Eric Crampton: Here’s a fun one for those of you still based at a university. All of you put together a Human Ethics Review proposal for a field experiment on Human Ethics Review proposals. Here is the proposal within my proposal. Each of you would propose […] The post Bertrand Russell goes to the IRB appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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William Shakespeare (1) vs. Karl Marx

February 27, 2015
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For yesterday‘s winner, I’ll follow the reasoning of Manuel in comments: Popper. We would learn more from falsifying the hypothesis that Popper’s talk is boring than what we would learn from falsifying the hypothesis that Richard Pryor’s talk is uninteresting. And today we have the consensus choice for greatest writer vs. the notorious political philosopher. […] The post William Shakespeare (1) vs. Karl Marx appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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“The harm done by tests of significance” (article from 1994 in the journal, “Accident Analysis and Prevention”)

February 27, 2015
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Ezra Hauer writes: In your January 2013 Commentary (Epidemiology) you say that “…misunderstanding persists even in high-stakes settings.” Attached is an older paper illustrating some such. “It is like trying to sink a battleship by...

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Richard Pryor (1) vs. Karl Popper

February 26, 2015
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Richard Pryor (1) vs. Karl Popper

The top-seeded comedian vs. an unseeded philosopher. Pryor would be much more entertaining, that’s for sure (“Arizona State Penitentiary population: 80 percent black people. But there are no black people in Arizona!”). But Karl Popper laid out the philosophy that is the foundation for modern science. His talk, even if it is dry, might ultimately […] The post Richard Pryor (1) vs. Karl Popper appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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Psych journal bans significance tests; stat blogger inundated with emails

February 26, 2015
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OK, it’s been a busy email day. From Brandon Nakawaki: I know your blog is perpetually backlogged by a few months, but I thought I’d forward this to you in case it hadn’t hit your inbox yet. A journal called Basic and Applied Social Psychology is banning null hypothesis significance testing in favor of descriptive […] The post Psych journal bans significance tests; stat blogger inundated with emails appeared first…

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Abraham (4) vs. Jane Austen

February 25, 2015
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Abraham (4) vs. Jane Austen

Yesterday’s is a super-tough call. I’d much rather hear Stewart Lee than Aristotle. I read one of Lee’s books, and he’s a fascinating explicator of performance. Lee gives off a charming David Owen vibe—Phil, you know what I’m saying here—he’s an everyman, nothing special, he’s just been thinking really hard lately and wants to share […] The post Abraham (4) vs. Jane Austen appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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The axes are labeled but I don’t know what the dots represent.

February 25, 2015
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The axes are labeled but I don’t know what the dots represent.

John Sukup writes: I came across a chart recently posted by Boston Consulting Group on LinkedIn and wondered what your take on it was. To me, it seems to fall into the “suspicious” category but thought you may have a different opinion. I replied that this one baffles me cos I don’t know what the […] The post The axes are labeled but I don’t know what the dots represent.…

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Aristotle (3) vs. Stewart Lee

February 24, 2015
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Yesterday‘s winner is a tough one. Really, these two guys could’ve met in the final. Some arguments in the comments in favor of Freud: From Huw, “he has the smirks, knowing looks, and barely missed sidelong glances.” And Seth points out the statistical connection: “Some people might say that theory is getting lost in the […] The post Aristotle (3) vs. Stewart Lee appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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“A small but growing collection of studies suggest X” . . . huh?

February 24, 2015
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Lee Beck writes: I’m curious if you have any thoughts on the statistical meaning of sentences like “a small but growing collection of studies suggest [X].” That exact wording comes from this piece in the New Yorker, but I think it’s the sort of expression you often see in science journalism (“small but mounting”, “small […] The post “A small but growing collection of studies suggest X” . . .…

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