Blog Archives

PPNAS: How does it happen? And happen? And happen? And happen?

May 4, 2016
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PPNAS:  How does it happen?  And happen?  And happen?  And happen?

In the comment thread to today’s post on journalists who take PPNAS papers at face value, Mark asked, in response to various flaws pointed out in one of these papers: How can the authors (and the reviewers and the editor) not be aware of something so elementary? My reply: Regarding the authors, see here. Statistics […] The post PPNAS: How does it happen? And happen? And happen? And happen? appeared…

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Journalists are suckers for anything that looks like science. And selection bias makes it even worse. But I was unfair to NPR.

May 3, 2016
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Journalists are suckers for anything that looks like science.  And selection bias makes it even worse.  But I was unfair to NPR.

Journalists are suckers. Marks. Vics. Boobs. Rubes. You get the picture. Where are the classically street-trained reporters, the descendants of Ring Lardner and Joe Liebling, the hard-bitten journos who would laugh in the face of a press release? Today, nowhere in evidence. I’m speaking, of course, about the reaction in the press to the latest […] The post Journalists are suckers for anything that looks like science. And selection bias…

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Ahhhh, PPNAS!

May 3, 2016
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Ahhhh, PPNAS!

To busy readers: Skip to the tl;dr summary at the end of this post. A psychology researcher sent me an email with subject line, “There’s a hell of a paper coming out in PPNAS today.” He sent me a copy of the paper, “Physical and situational inequality on airplanes predicts air rage,” by Katherine DeCelles […] The post Ahhhh, PPNAS! appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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Macassar

May 3, 2016
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Some of the discussion of yesterday’s post reminded me of a wonderful bit from Life on the Mississippi: When I was a boy, there was but one permanent ambition among my comrades in our village on the west bank of the Mississippi River. That was, to be a steamboatman. We had transient ambitions of other […] The post Macassar appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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Are you pro or anti-biotics?

May 2, 2016
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Are you pro or anti-biotics?

Paul Alper points to this news article by Susan Perry: Probiotics have been overhyped and rely on ‘shaky’ science, reporter finds Although some of these studies’ results may be promising, they aren’t strong enough to support the long list of claims currently being made by the manufacturers of probiotic products. . . . Perry links […] The post Are you pro or anti-biotics? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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On deck this week

May 2, 2016
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Mon: Are you pro or anti-biotics? Tues: “Null hypothesis” = “A specific random number generator” Wed: No guarantee Thurs: The Puzzle of Paul Meehl: An intellectual history of research criticism in psychology Fri: Redemption Sat: Doing dat...

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No Retractions, Only Corrections: A manifesto.

May 1, 2016
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Under the heading, “Why that Evolution paper should never have been retracted: A reviewer speaks out,” biologist Ben Ashby writes: The problems of post-publication peer review have already been highlighted elsewhere, and it certainly isn’t rare for a paper to be retracted due to an honest mistake (although most retractions are due to misconduct). Moreover, […] The post No Retractions, Only Corrections: A manifesto. appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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Controlling for variation in the weather in a regression analysis: Joe and Uri should learn about multilevel models and then they could give even better advice

May 1, 2016
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Joe Simmons and Uri Simonsohn have an interesting post here. Unfortunately their blog doesn’t have a comment section so I’m commenting here. They write this at the end of their post: Another is to use daily dummies. This option can easily be worse. It can lower statistical power by throwing away data. First, one can […] The post Controlling for variation in the weather in a regression analysis: Joe and…

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Some folks like to get away, take a holiday from the neighborhood

April 30, 2016
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Saw a couple of plays, both excellent. Fun Home. Compared to what I remembered of the book (which I also thought was excellent), the play seemed to be more about her family and less about Bechdel herself. But that worked for me. Bechdel’s story won’t be shared by everybody, but we all have families. The […] The post Some folks like to get away, take a holiday from the neighborhood…

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Gary Venter’s age-period-cohort decomposition of US male mortality trends

April 29, 2016
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Gary Venter’s age-period-cohort decomposition of US male mortality trends

Following up on yesterday’s post on mortality trends, I wanted to share with you a research note by actuary Gary Venter, “A Quick Look at Cohort Effects in US Male Mortality.” Venter produces this graph: And he writes: Cohort effects in mortality tend to be difficult to explain. Often strings of coincidences are invoked – […] The post Gary Venter’s age-period-cohort decomposition of US male mortality trends appeared first on…

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