Blog Archives

Question about the secret weapon

June 23, 2017
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Question about the secret weapon

Micah Wright writes: I first encountered your explanation of secret weapon plots while I was browsing your blog in grad school, and later in your 2007 book with Jennifer Hill. I found them immediately compelling and intuitive, but I have been met with a lot of confusion and some skepticism when I’ve tried to use […] The post Question about the secret weapon appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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“Developers Who Use Spaces Make More Money Than Those Who Use Tabs”

June 22, 2017
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“Developers Who Use Spaces Make More Money Than Those Who Use Tabs”

Rudy Malka writes: I think you’ll enjoy this nice piece of pop regression by David Robinson: developers who use spaces make more money than those who use tabs. I’d like to know your opinion about it. At the above link, Robinson discusses a survey that allows him to compare salaries of software developers who use […] The post “Developers Who Use Spaces Make More Money Than Those Who Use Tabs”…

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Time-sharing Experiments for the Social Sciences

June 22, 2017
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Jamie Druckman writes: Time-sharing Experiments for the Social Sciences (TESS) is an NSF-funded initiative. Investigators propose survey experiments to be fielded using a nationally representative Internet platform via NORC’s AmeriSpeak® Panel (see http:/tessexperiments.org for more information). In an effort to enable younger scholars to field larger-scale studies than what TESS normally conducts, we are pleased to announce a Special […] The post Time-sharing Experiments for the Social Sciences appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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After Peptidegate, a proposed new slogan for PPNAS. And, as a bonus, a fun little graphics project.

June 21, 2017
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After Peptidegate, a proposed new slogan for PPNAS.  And, as a bonus, a fun little graphics project.

Someone pointed me to this post by “Neuroskeptic”: A new paper in the prestigious journal PNAS contains a rather glaring blooper. . . . right there in the abstract, which states that “three neuropeptides (β-endorphin, oxytocin, and dopamine) play particularly important roles” in human sociality. But dopamine is not a neuropeptide. Neither are serotonin or […] The post After Peptidegate, a proposed new slogan for PPNAS. And, as a bonus,…

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On deck through the rest of the year (and a few to begin 2018)

June 20, 2017
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Here they are. I love seeing all the titles lined up in one place; it’s like a big beautiful poem about statistics: After Peptidegate, a proposed new slogan for PPNAS. And, as a bonus, a fun little graphics project. “Developers Who Use Spaces Make More Money Than Those Who Use Tabs” Question about the secret […] The post On deck through the rest of the year (and a few to…

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Not everyone’s aware of falsificationist Bayes

June 20, 2017
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Stephen Martin writes: Daniel Lakens recently blogged about philosophies of science and how they relate to statistical philosophies. I thought it may be of interest to you. In particular, this statement: From a scientific realism perspective, Bayes Factors or Bayesian posteriors do not provide an answer to the main question of interest, which is the […] The post Not everyone’s aware of falsificationist Bayes appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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Breaking the dataset into little pieces and putting it back together again

June 19, 2017
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Alex Konkel writes: I was a little surprised that your blog post with the three smaller studies versus one larger study question received so many comments, and also that so many people seemed to come down on the side of three smaller studies. I understand that Stephen’s framing led to some confusion as well as […] The post Breaking the dataset into little pieces and putting it back together again…

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Don’t say “improper prior.” Say “non-generative model.”

June 18, 2017
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[cat picture] In Bayesian Data Analysis, we write, “In general, we call a prior density p(θ) proper if it does not depend on data and integrates to 1.” This was a step forward from the usual understanding which is that a prior density is improper if an infinite integral. But I’m not so thrilled with […] The post Don’t say “improper prior.” Say “non-generative model.” appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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Where’d the $2500 come from?

June 17, 2017
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Brad Buchsbaum writes: Sometimes I read the New York Times “Well” articles on science and health. It’s a mixed bag, sometimes it’s quite good and sometimes not. I came across this yesterday: What’s the Value of Exercise? $2,500 For people still struggling to make time for exercise, a new study offers a strong incentive: You’ll […] The post Where’d the $2500 come from? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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SPEED: Parallelizing Stan using the Message Passing Interface (MPI)

June 16, 2017
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SPEED:  Parallelizing Stan using the Message Passing Interface (MPI)

Sebastian Weber writes: Bayesian inference has to overcome tough computational challenges and thanks to Stan we now have a scalable MCMC sampler available. For a Stan model running NUTS, the computational cost is dominated by gradient calculations of the model log-density as a function of the parameters. While NUTS is scalable to huge parameter spaces, […] The post SPEED: Parallelizing Stan using the Message Passing Interface (MPI) appeared first on…

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