Blog Archives

Hideout

March 30, 2017
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Hideout

I got this email from a journalist: This seems . . . irresponsible to me. Particularly: For the first 100 years that meteorologists kept weather records at Central Park, from 1869 through 1996, they recorded just two snowstorms that dumped 20 inches or more. But since 1996, counting this week’s storm, there have been six. […] The post Hideout appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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Easier-to-download graphs of age-adjusted mortality trends by sex, ethnicity, and age group

March 29, 2017
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Easier-to-download graphs of age-adjusted mortality trends by sex, ethnicity, and age group

Jonathan Auerbach and I recently created graphs of smoothed age-adjusted mortality trends from 1999-2014 for: – 50 states – men and women – non-hispanic whites, blacks, and hispanics – age categories 0-1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84. We posted about this on the blog and also wrote an article for Slate […] The post Easier-to-download graphs of age-adjusted mortality trends by sex, ethnicity, and age group…

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Crack Shot

March 29, 2017
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Crack Shot

Raghu Parthasarathy writes: You might find this interesting, an article (and related essay) on the steadily declining percentage of NIH awards going to mid-career scientists and the steadily increasing percentage going to older researchers. The key figure is below. The part that may be of particular interest to you, since you’ve written about age-adjustment in demographic work: does […] The post Crack Shot appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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The Association for Psychological Pseudoscience presents . . .

March 28, 2017
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The Association for Psychological Pseudoscience presents . . .

Hey! The organization that publishes all those Psychological Science-style papers has scheduled their featured presentations for their next meeting. Included are: – That person who slaps the label “terrorists” on people who have the nerve to question their statistical errors. – One of the people who claimed that women were 20 percentage points were likely […] The post The Association for Psychological Pseudoscience presents . . . appeared first on…

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The Las Vegas Odds

March 27, 2017
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Kevin Lewis suggests the above name for pro football’s newest team, after hearing that “The NFL is letting the Oakland Raiders move to Las Vegas, a move once nearly unthinkable due to its opposition to sports gambling.” Is there anyone good at graphic design who’d like to design a logo? I’m not sure what images […] The post The Las Vegas Odds appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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2 Stan job postings at Columbia (links fixed)

March 27, 2017
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1. Stan programmer. This is the “Stan programmers” position described here. 2. Stan project development. This is the Stan business developer/grants manager described here. To apply, click on the first link for each position above (the academicjobs.columbia.edu site) and follow the instructions. P.S. In first version of this post I messed up the links. They’re […] The post 2 Stan job postings at Columbia (links fixed) appeared first on Statistical…

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Probability and Statistics in the Study of Voting and Public Opinion (my talk at the Columbia Applied Probability and Risk seminar, 30 Mar at 1pm)

March 27, 2017
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Probability and Statistics in the Study of Voting and Public Opinion Elections have both uncertainty and variation and hence represent a natural application of probability theory. In addition, opinion polling is a classic statistics problem and is featured in just about every course on the topic. But many common intuitions about probability, statistics, and voting […] The post Probability and Statistics in the Study of Voting and Public Opinion (my…

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Dead Wire

March 26, 2017
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Kevin Lewis pointed me to this quote from a forthcoming article: Daniele Fanelli and colleagues examined more than 3,000 meta-analyses covering 22 scientific disciplines for multiple commonly discussed bias patterns. Studies reporting large effect sizes were associated with large standard errors and large numbers of citations to the study, and were more likely to be […] The post Dead Wire appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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Let’s accept the idea that treatment effects vary—not as something special but just as a matter of course

March 25, 2017
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Let’s accept the idea that treatment effects vary—not as something special but just as a matter of course

Tyler Cowen writes: Does knowing the price lower your enjoyment of goods and services? I [Cowen] don’t quite agree with this as stated, as the experience of enjoying a bargain can make it more pleasurable, or at least I have seen this for many people. Some in fact enjoy the bargain only, not the actual […] The post Let’s accept the idea that treatment effects vary—not as something special but…

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No-op: The case of Case and Deaton

March 24, 2017
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In responding to some recent blog comments I noticed an overlap among our two most recent posts: 1. Mortality rate trends by age, ethnicity, sex, and state 2. When does research have active opposition? The first post was all about the fascinating patterns you can find by analyzing and graphing data from the CDC Wonder […] The post No-op: The case of Case and Deaton appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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