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Why the garden-of-forking-paths criticism of p-values is not like a famous Borscht Belt comedy bit

September 30, 2016
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Why the garden-of-forking-paths criticism of p-values is not like a famous Borscht Belt comedy bit

People point me to things on the internet that they’re sure I’ll hate. I read one of these awhile ago—unfortunately I can’t remember who wrote it or where it appeared, but it raised a criticism, not specifically of me, I believe, but more generally of skeptics such as Uri Simonsohn and myself who keep bringing […] The post Why the garden-of-forking-paths criticism of p-values is not like a famous Borscht…

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NPR’s gonna NPR

September 29, 2016
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NPR’s gonna NPR

I was gonna give this post the title, Stat Rage More Severe in the Presence of First-Class Journals, but then I thought I’d keep it simple. Chapter 1. Background OK, here’s what happened. A couple weeks ago someone pointed me to a low-quality paper that appeared in PPNAS (the prestigious Proceedings of the National Academy […] The post NPR’s gonna NPR appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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Don’t move Penn Station

September 29, 2016
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I agree 100% with Henry Grabar on this one. Ever since I heard many years ago about the plan to blog a few billion dollars moving NYC’s Penn Station to a prettier but less convenient location, I’ve grimaced. Big shots really love to spend our money on fancy architecture, don’t they? As I wrote a […] The post Don’t move Penn Station appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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He wants to get started on Bayes

September 29, 2016
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Mathew Mercuri writes: I am interested in learning how to work in a Bayesian world. I have training in a frequentist approach, specifically from an applied health scientist/epidemiologist approach. However, while i teach courses in applied statistics, I am not particularly savvy with heavy statistical mathematics, so I am a bit worried bout how to […] The post He wants to get started on Bayes appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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“Find the best algorithm (program) for your dataset.”

September 28, 2016
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Piero Foscari writes: Maybe you know about this already, but I found it amazingly brutal; while looking for some reproducible research resources I stumbled onto the following at mlcomp.org (which would be nice if done properly, at least as a standardization attempt): Find the best algorithm (program) for your dataset. Upload your dataset and run existing programs on it to […] The post “Find the best algorithm (program) for your dataset.” appeared first on Statistical…

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I refuse to blog about this one

September 27, 2016
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I refuse to blog about this one

Shravan points me to this article, Twitter Language Use Reflects Psychological Differences between Democrats and Republicans, which begins with the following self-parody of an abstract: Previous research has shown that political leanings correlate with various psychological factors. While surveys and experiments provide a rich source of information for political psychology, data from social networks can […] The post I refuse to blog about this one appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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Looking at the polls: Time to get down and dirty with the data

September 26, 2016
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Looking at the polls:  Time to get down and dirty with the data

Poll aggregation is great, but one thing that we’ve been saying a lot recently (see also here) is that we can also learn a lot by breaking open a survey and looking at the numbers crawling around inside. Here’s a new example. It comes from Alan Abramowitz, who writes: Very strange results of new ABC/WP […] The post Looking at the polls: Time to get down and dirty with the…

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No statistically significant differences for get up and go

September 26, 2016
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Anoop Balachandran writes: This is one of the abstracts of the paper i am about to publish: My question is can I really say both training program were effective for increasing power and function? Studies of similar duration employing sedentary control showed either negative or 1-2% changes. Also, I don’t think strength and function will […] The post No statistically significant differences for get up and go appeared first on…

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Politics and chance

September 25, 2016
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After the New Hampshire primary Nadia Hassan wrote: Some have noted how minor differences in how the candidates come out in these primaries can make a huge difference in the media coverage. For example, only a few thousand voters separate third and fifth and it really impacts how pundits talk about a candidate’s performance. Chance […] The post Politics and chance appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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Cracks in the thin blue line

September 24, 2016
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Cracks in the thin blue line

When people screw up or cheat in their research, what do their collaborators say? The simplest case is when coauthors admit their error, as Cexun Jeffrey Cai and I did when it turned out that we’d miscoded a key variable in an analysis, invalidating the empirical claims of our award-winning paper. On the other extreme, […] The post Cracks in the thin blue line appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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