Blog Archives

Cloak and dagger

February 22, 2017
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Cloak and dagger

Elan B. writes: I saw this JAMA Pediatrics article [by Julia Raifman, Ellen Moscoe, and S. Bryn Austin] getting a lot of press for claiming that LGBT suicide attempts went down 14% after gay marriage was legalized. The heart of the study is comparing suicide attempt rates (in last 12 months) before and after exposure — gay marriage legalization […] The post Cloak and dagger appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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Cloak and dagger

February 22, 2017
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Cloak and dagger

Elan B. writes: I saw this JAMA Pediatrics article [by Julia Raifman, Ellen Moscoe, and S. Bryn Austin] getting a lot of press for claiming that LGBT suicide attempts went down 14% after gay marriage was legalized. The heart of the study is comparing suicide attempt rates (in last 12 months) before and after exposure — gay marriage legalization […] The post Cloak and dagger appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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Clay pigeon

February 22, 2017
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Sam Harper writes: Not that you are collecting these kinds of things, but I wanted to point to (yet) another benefit of the American Economic Association’s requirement of including replication datasets (unless there are confidentiality constraints) and code in order to publish in most of their journals—certainly for the top-tier ones like Am Econ Review: […] The post Clay pigeon appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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Looking for rigor in all the wrong places (my talk this Thursday in the Columbia economics department)

February 21, 2017
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Looking for rigor in all the wrong places (my talk this Thursday in the Columbia economics department)

Looking for Rigor in All the Wrong Places What do the following ideas and practices have in common: unbiased estimation, statistical significance, insistence on random sampling, and avoidance of prior information? All have been embraced as ways of enforcing rigor but all have backfired and led to sloppy analyses and erroneous inferences. We discuss these […] The post Looking for rigor in all the wrong places (my talk this Thursday…

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Unethical behavior vs. being a bad guy

February 21, 2017
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Unethical behavior vs. being a bad guy

I happened to come across this article and it reminded me of the general point that it’s possible to behave unethically without being a “bad guy.” The story in question involves some scientists who did some experiments about thirty years ago on the biological effects of low-frequency magnetic fields. They published their results in a […] The post Unethical behavior vs. being a bad guy appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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Should the Problems with Polls Make Us Worry about the Quality of Health Surveys? (my talk at CDC tomorrow)

February 20, 2017
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My talk this Thursday at CDC, Tuesday, February 21, 2017, 12:00 noon, 2400 Century Center, Room 1015C: Should the Problems with Polls Make Us Worry about the Quality of Health Surveys? Response rates in public opinion polls have been steadily declining for more than half a century and are currently heading toward the 0% mark. […] The post Should the Problems with Polls Make Us Worry about the Quality of…

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Blind Spot

February 20, 2017
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Blind Spot

X pointed me to this news article reporting an increase in death rate among young adults in the United States: Selon une enquête publiée le 26 janvier par la revue scientifique The Lancet, le taux de mortalité des jeunes Américains âgés de 25 à 35 ans a connu une progression entre 1999 et 2014, alors […] The post Blind Spot appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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Accessing the contents of a stanfit object

February 20, 2017
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I was just needing this. Then, lo and behold, I found it on the web. It’s credited to Stan Development Team but I assume it was written by Ben and Jonah. Good to have this all in one place. The post Accessing the contents of a stanfit object a...

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ComSciCon: Science Communication Workshop for Graduate Students

February 19, 2017
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Nathan Sanders writes: A few years ago, you were kind enough to post a notice on your blog about our science communication conference by grad students, for grad students (ComSciCon). I thought I’d let you know that our program has been going strong and growing, and we’re excited to have opened our application for the […] The post ComSciCon: Science Communication Workshop for Graduate Students appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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“Luckily, medicine is a practice that ignores the requirements of science in favor of patient care.”

February 19, 2017
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“Luckily, medicine is a practice that ignores the requirements of science in favor of patient care.”

Javier Benitez writes: This is a paragraph from Kathryn Montgomery’s book, How Doctors Think: If medicine were practiced as if it were a science, even a probabilistic science, my daughter’s breast cancer might never have been diagnosed in time. At 28, she was quite literally off the charts, far too young, an unlikely patient who […] The post “Luckily, medicine is a practice that ignores the requirements of science in…

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