The butterfly curve

October 7, 2015
By
The butterfly curve

Have you ever thought drawing your own butterfly? I came across the butterfly curve, which was discovered by Temple Fay. The butterfly curve is produced by a parametric equation where: x = sin(t) * (e^cos(t)-2cos(λt)-sin(t/12)^5) and y = cos(t) *...

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The butterfly curve

October 7, 2015
By
The butterfly curve

Have you ever thought drawing your own butterfly? I came across the butterfly curve, which was discovered by Temple Fay. The butterfly curve is produced by a parametric equation where: x = sin(t) * (e^cos(t)-2cos(λt)-sin(t/12)^5) and y = cos(t) *...

Read more »

The butterfly curve

October 7, 2015
By
The butterfly curve

Have you ever thought drawing your own butterfly? I came across the butterfly curve, which was discovered by Temple Fay. The butterfly curve is produced by a parametric equation where: x = sin(t) * (e^cos(t)-2cos(λt)-sin(t/12)^5) and y = cos(t) *...

Read more »

The butterfly curve

October 7, 2015
By
The butterfly curve

Have you ever thought drawing your own butterfly? I came across the butterfly curve, which was discovered by Temple Fay. The butterfly curve is produced by a parametric equation where: x = sin(t) * (e^cos(t)-2cos(λt)-sin(t/12)^5) and y = cos(t) *...

Read more »

The butterfly curve

October 7, 2015
By
The butterfly curve

Have you ever thought drawing your own butterfly? I came across the butterfly curve, which was discovered by Temple Fay. The butterfly curve is produced by a parametric equation where: x = sin(t) * (e^cos(t)-2cos(λt)-sin(t/12)^5) and y = cos(t) *...

Read more »

The butterfly curve

October 7, 2015
By
The butterfly curve

Have you ever thought drawing your own butterfly? I came across the butterfly curve, which was discovered by Temple Fay. The butterfly curve is produced by a parametric equation where: x = sin(t) * (e^cos(t)-2cos(λt)-sin(t/12)^5) and y = cos(t) *...

Read more »

PhDeidippides

October 6, 2015
By
PhDeidippides

Anthony (who's doing good work in his PhD project) also doubles as a runner and has written a nice post for the Significance website.Clearly (just look at the numbers!), for many people this is a serious issue $-$ the fact that you can't run officially...

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Anti-cheating robots

October 6, 2015
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Paul Alper writes: Surely you would like to comment on the amazing escalation in the anti-cheating tech world. I predict it will be followed by some clever software which makes it appear that the student enrolled is actually the one taking the exam. Reminiscent of the height of the cold war of counter weapons and […] The post Anti-cheating robots appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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After seeing this chart, my mouth needed a rinse

October 6, 2015
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After seeing this chart, my mouth needed a rinse

The credit for today's headline goes to Andrew Gelman, who said something like that when I presented the following chart at his Statistical Graphics class yesterday: With this chart (which appeared in a large ad in the NY Times), Fidelity...

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R in Insurance 2016

October 6, 2015
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R in Insurance 2016

Following the successful 3rd R in Insurance conference in Amsterdam this year, we will return to London next year. We will be back at Cass Business School, 11 July 2016.The event will focus again on the use of R in insurance, bringing together experts ...

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PMXStan: an R package to facilitate Bayesian PKPD modeling with Stan

October 6, 2015
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PMXStan: an R package to facilitate Bayesian PKPD modeling with Stan

From Yuan Xiong, David A James, Fei He, and Wenping Wang at Novartis. Full version of the poster here. The post PMXStan: an R package to facilitate Bayesian PKPD modeling with Stan appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social S...

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Using differential privacy to reuse training data

October 5, 2015
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Using differential privacy to reuse training data

Win-Vector LLC‘s Nina Zumel wrote a great article explaining differential privacy and demonstrating how to use it to enhance forward step-wise logistic regression (essentially reusing test data). This allowed her to reproduce results similar to the recent Science paper “The reusable holdout: Preserving validity in adaptive data analysis”. The technique essentially protects and reuses test … Continue reading Using differential privacy to reuse training data

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Undirected Graphs When the Causality Is Mutual

October 5, 2015
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Undirected Graphs When the Causality Is Mutual

Structural equation models impose causal order on a set of observations. We start with a measurement model: a list of theoretical constructs and a table assigning what is observed (manifest) to what is hidden (latent). Although it is possible to think ...

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Cognitive skills rising and falling

October 5, 2015
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Cognitive skills rising and falling

David Hogg writes: I thought this was either interesting or bunk—using online games to infer how various kinds of cognitive intelligence vary with age. I thought it might be interesting to you on a number of levels. For one: Are there really categories of intelligence and can these map onto online games? For another: How […] The post Cognitive skills rising and falling appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Statbusters: Simple computations mislead, from selfies to colleges

October 5, 2015
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In this week's Statbusters (link), we discuss two recent widely-shared articles, one on deaths while taking selfies, and the other on the gender gap in income among graduates of top-tier universities. The common element between these two pieces is a reductionist analysis that looks at the correlation between a single variable X and an outcome Y when the outcome Y is affected by a multitude of variables. For example, it…

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On deck this week

October 5, 2015
By

Mon: Cognitive skills rising and falling Tues: Anti-cheating robots Wed: Mindset interventions are a scalable treatment for academic underachievement — or not? Thurs: Most successful blog post ever Fri: Political advertising update Sat: Doomed to fail: A pre-registration site for parapsychology Sun: Mars Missions are a Scam Also, don’t forget what’s on deck for the […] The post On deck this week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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How to generate random integers in SAS

October 5, 2015
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How to generate random integers in SAS

I was recently talking with some SAS customers and someone started talking about generating random numbers. I was asked "Why can't SAS create an easy way to generate random numbers? Excel has a simple way to generate random numbers between 1 and 100, and I use it all the time." […] The post How to generate random integers in SAS appeared first on The DO Loop.

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Summarising with Box and Whisker plots

October 5, 2015
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Summarising with Box and Whisker plots

In the Northern Hemisphere, it is the start of the school year, and thousands of eager students are beginning their study of statistics. I know this because this is the time of year when lots of people watch my video, … Continue reading →

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Summarising with Box and Whisker plots

October 5, 2015
By
Summarising with Box and Whisker plots

In the Northern Hemisphere, it is the start of the school year, and thousands of eager students are beginning their study of statistics. I know this because this is the time of year when lots of people watch my video, … Continue reading →

Read more »

Whither Econometric Principal-Components Regressions?

October 4, 2015
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Principal-components regression (PCR) is routine in applied time-series econometrics.Why so much PCR, and so little ridge regression? Ridge and PCR are both shrinkage procedures involving PC's. The difference is that ridge effectively includes all...

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Cointegration & Granger Causality

October 4, 2015
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Cointegration & Granger Causality

Today, I had a query from a reader of this blog regarding cointegration and Granger causality. Essentially, the email said:"I tested two economic time-series and found them to be cointegrated. However, when I then tested for Granger  causalit...

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Flamebait: “Mathiness” in economics and political science

October 4, 2015
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Flamebait:  “Mathiness” in economics and political science

Political scientist Brian Silver points me to his post by economist Paul Romer, who writes: The style that I [Romer] am calling mathiness lets academic politics masquerade as science. Like mathematical theory, mathiness uses a mixture of words and symbols, but instead of making tight links, it leaves ample room for slippage between statements in […] The post Flamebait: “Mathiness” in economics and political science appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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Flamebait: “Mathiness” in economics and political science

October 4, 2015
By
Flamebait:  “Mathiness” in economics and political science

Political scientist Brian Silver points me to his post by economist Paul Romer, who writes: The style that I [Romer] am calling mathiness lets academic politics masquerade as science. Like mathematical theory, mathiness uses a mixture of words and symbols, but instead of making tight links, it leaves ample room for slippage between statements in […] The post Flamebait: “Mathiness” in economics and political science appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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