Statistics + Journalism = Data Journalism ?

October 27, 2013
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Statistics + Journalism = Data Journalism ?

Statistics+journalism=data journalism is not the full truth. The equation may make sense because statistics are the most important source for data …Continue reading →

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Statistics + Journalism = Data Journalism ?

October 27, 2013
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Statistics + Journalism = Data Journalism ?

Statistics+journalism=data journalism is not the full truth. The equation may make sense because statistics are the most important source for data …Continue reading →

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Montreal R User Group – Dr. Ramnath Vaidyanathan on his rCharts package

October 27, 2013
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Montreal R User Group –  Dr. Ramnath Vaidyanathan on his rCharts package

Monday, October 28, 2013. 6:00pm at Notman House 51 Sherbrooke W., Montreal, QC. We are very pleased to welcome back Dr. Ramnath Vaidyanathan for a talk on interactive documents as it relates to his excellent rCharts package. Bringing a laptop to follow along is highly encouraged. I would recommend installing rCharts prior to the workshop. library(devtools) pkgs <- c(‘rCharts’, ‘slidify’, ‘slidifyLibraries’) install_github(pkgs, ‘ramnathv’, ref […]

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Uncompressing the concept of compressed sensing

October 27, 2013
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I received the following email: These compressed sensing people link to Shannon’s advice. It’s refreshing when leaders of a field state that their stuff may not be a panacea. I replied: Scarily enough, I don’t know anything about this research area at all! My correspondent followed up: Meh. They proved L1 approximates L0 when design […]The post Uncompressing the concept of compressed sensing appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Symmetry in Williams designs

October 27, 2013
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Based on some comments I am looking at using symmetry to obtain Williams style designs. Symmetry allows reduction of the number of combinations examined hence faster calculation times. Two avenues are examined. Both work for a low number of treatments....

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Comedy hour at the Bayesian (epistemology) retreat: highly probable vs highly probed (vs what ?)

October 27, 2013
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Comedy hour at the Bayesian (epistemology) retreat: highly probable vs highly probed (vs what ?)

Our favorite high school student, Isaac, gets a better shot at showing his college readiness using one of the comparative measures of support or confirmation discussed last week. Their assessment thus seems more in sync with the severe tester, but they are not purporting that z is evidence for inferring (or even believing) an H […]

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Practical Data Science with R October 2013 update

October 26, 2013
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Practical Data Science with R October 2013 update

A quick status update on our upcoming book “Practical Data Science with R” by Nina Zumel and John Mount. We are really happy with how the book is coming out. We were able to cover most everything we hoped to. Part 1 (especially chapter 3) is already being used in courses, and has some very […] Related posts: Data science project planning Data Science, Machine Learning, and Statistics: what is…

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“The Bayesian approach to forensic evidence”

October 26, 2013
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“The Bayesian approach to forensic evidence”

Mike Zyphur sent along this paper by Corinna Kruse: This article draws attention to communication across professions as an important aspect of forensic evidence. Based on ethnographic fieldwork in the Swedish legal system, it shows how forensic scientists use a particular quantitative approach to evaluating forensic laboratory results, the Bayesian approach, as a means of […]The post “The Bayesian approach to forensic evidence” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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“We agree that everyone deserves a second chance. But we do prefer when those given a second chance acknowledge that they did something wrong.”

October 25, 2013
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Yup. The post “We agree that everyone deserves a second chance. But we do prefer when those given a second chance acknowledge that they did something wrong.” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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NBER/NSF Time-Series Conference: Retrospect and Prospect

October 25, 2013
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I recently reported here on the Barrigozzi-Brownlees paper, "Network Estimation for Time Series." I heard it presented a few weeks ago at the 2013 NBER/NSF Time Series Conference, hosted this year by the Federal Reserve Board in Washington (a...

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(Back to) The Future of Statistical Software #futureofstats

October 25, 2013
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In anticipation of the upcoming Unconference on the Future of Statistics next Wednesday at 12-1pm EDT, I thought I'd dig up what people in the past had said about the future so we can see how things turned out. In doing … Continue reading →

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Come hear my talk next Tuesday

October 25, 2013
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Come hear my talk next Tuesday

I will speak in the unCommon Salon series at NYU's Bobst Library, next Tuesday 6 pm. Registration link is here. You need to RSVP and get yourself on the guest list. Here is a clickable link.

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Pricing Reinsurance Contracts

October 25, 2013
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Pricing Reinsurance Contracts

In order to illustrate the next section of the non-life insurance course, consider the following example1, inspired from http://sciencepolicy.colorado.edu/…. This is the so-called “Normalized Hurricane Damages in the United States” dataset, for the period 1900-2005, from Pielke et al. (2008). The dataset is available in xls format, so we have to spend some time to import it, > library(gdata) > db=read.xls( + "http://sciencepolicy.colorado.edu/publications/special/public_data_may_2007.xls", + sheet=1) trying URL 'http://sciencepolicy.colorado.edu/publications/special/public_data_may_2007.xls' Content type 'application/vnd.ms-excel'…

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Pricing Reinsurance Contracts

October 25, 2013
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Pricing Reinsurance Contracts

In order to illustrate the next section of the non-life insurance course, consider the following example1, inspired from http://sciencepolicy.colorado.edu/…. This is the so-called “Normalized Hurricane Damages in the United States” dataset, for the period 1900-2005, from Pielke et al. (2008). The dataset is available in xls format, so we have to spend some time to import it, > library(gdata) > db=read.xls( + "http://sciencepolicy.colorado.edu/publications/special/public_data_may_2007.xls", + sheet=1) trying URL 'http://sciencepolicy.colorado.edu/publications/special/public_data_may_2007.xls' Content type 'application/vnd.ms-excel'…

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MCMSki IV, Jan. 6-8, 2014, Chamonix (news #11)

October 24, 2013
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MCMSki IV, Jan. 6-8, 2014, Chamonix (news #11)

Now that the important deadline of October 15 for MCMSki IV is over, First, thanks to the more that 160 participants who already registred! The audience is now larger than at any of the previous MCMSki meetings! (Obviously, from a statistical perspective, the comparison is somewhat unfair as running three parallel sessions instead of one single track session is […]

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Exoplanet Statistics

October 24, 2013
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Exoplanet Statistics

There are very special statistics where the survey instrument is a telescope and the data are far from our world. …Continue reading →

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Exoplanet Statistics

October 24, 2013
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Exoplanet Statistics

There are very special statistics where the survey instrument is a telescope and the data are far from our world. …Continue reading →

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Chasing the noise: W. Edwards Deming would be spinning in his grave

October 24, 2013
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Chasing the noise:  W. Edwards Deming would be spinning in his grave

Amy Cohen writes: A surgeon showed me the “report card” his hospital received about his surgical group. The figure below shows what the report card looks like. I am very curious to hear what you think about the “deciles of the odds ratio” approach to evaluate and rank hospitals used by the American College of […]The post Chasing the noise: W. Edwards Deming would be spinning in his grave appeared…

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Limiting scope paradoxically makes a problem harder

October 24, 2013
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I left a comment on one of Andrew Gelman's recent posts about Malcolm Gladwell (link). This post discusses briefly a review of Gladwell's recent book. A commenter ("Haile") made the following defense of Gladwell: My point is that many of these criticisms are based on Gladwell’s failure to present rigorous statistical evidence of arguments that are not statistical in nature in the first place. when (if) reading Gladwell, it’s time…

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Want to work with me? Count to 3.

October 24, 2013
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This stumps job applicants all the time (although probably not after this post). I flip a coin two times. Given that at least one of the flips is heads, what's the probability that both flips are heads. 50% you say? Sorry, but no. Don't feel bad...

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The joy of data analysis

October 24, 2013
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The joy of data analysis

Music and snow. Poke my eyes out Perhaps your immediate response is: “I’d rather poke my eyes out with a burning stick than do data analysis.” There’s a completely different reaction from a lot of people who have experienced data analysis. Music It’s not entirely clear why humans like music so much. Part of it […] The post The joy of data analysis appeared first on Burns Statistics.

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Update for Backtesting Asset Allocation Portfolios post

October 24, 2013
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Update for Backtesting Asset Allocation Portfolios post

It was over a year since my original post, Backtesting Asset Allocation portfolios. I have expanded the functionality of the Systematic Investor Toolbox both in terms of optimization functions and helper back-test functions during this period. Today, I want to update the Backtesting Asset Allocation portfolios post and showcase new functionality. I will use the […]

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PubMed Commons

October 23, 2013
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PubMed Commons

Don’t you wish there was a way to comment on papers? Now there is. Thanks to the efforts of Rob Tibshirani, Pat Brown, Mike Eisen, David Lipman and others there is now a system called PubMed Commons. PubMed is the central repository for biomedical research. PubMed Commons allows people to have active discussions of papers. […]

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