Writing and Calling Functions (Introduction to Statistical Computing)

September 15, 2013
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Lecture 4: Just as data structures tie related values together into objects, functions tie related commands together into objects. Declaring functions. Arguments (inputs) and return values (outputs). Named arguments, defaults, and calling functions....

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Homework: Tweaking Resource-Allocation-by-Tweaking (Introduction to Statistical Computing)

September 15, 2013
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In which we make incremental improvements to our code for planning by incremental improvements. Assignment, code. Introduction to Statistical Computing

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Import.io Site Wrapping for the Masses?

September 15, 2013
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Import.io Site Wrapping for the Masses?

I recently came across a new startup product called import.io. The product provides a site wrapping tool which allows anyone to create wrappers for sites with repeated structured information and thereby access the data on the site. For example, one...

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“When Bayesian Inference Shatters” Owhadi, Scovel, and Sullivan (guest post)

September 15, 2013
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“When Bayesian Inference Shatters” Owhadi, Scovel, and Sullivan (guest post)

I’m extremely grateful to Drs. Owhadi, Scovel and Sullivan for replying to my request for “a plain Jane” explication of their interesting paper, “When Bayesian Inference Shatters”, and especially for permission to post it. If readers want to ponder the paper awhile and send me comments for guest posts or “U-PHILS*” (by OCT 15), let […]

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paste, paste0, and sprintf

September 15, 2013
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paste, paste0, and sprintf

I find myself pasting urls and lots of little pieces together lately. Now paste is a standard go to guy when you wanna glue some stuff together. But often I find myself pasting and getting stuff like this: Rather than … Continue reading →

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Mixed models; Random Coefficients, part 2

September 14, 2013
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Continuing from random coefficients part 1, it is time for the second part. To quote the SAS/STAT manual 'a random coefficients model with error terms that follow a nested structure'. The additional random variable is monthc, which is a factor con...

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On blogging

September 14, 2013
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From 1982: The necessary conceit of the essayist must be that in writing down what is obvious to him he is not wasting his reader’s time. The value of what he does will depend on the quality of his perception, not on the length of his manuscript. Too many dull books about literature would have […]The post On blogging appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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LaTeX: Paragraph, Spacing, and Indentation

September 14, 2013
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LaTeX: Paragraph, Spacing, and Indentation

Let us visit the history of Statistics (source here), and utilize this for demonstrations of paragraph, spacing, and indentation in $\mathrm{\LaTeX}$. Consider the following: Output 1Executing these, we will have Output 1. This is the simplest way we c...

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Monty Hall (oh no, not again)

September 14, 2013
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Monty Hall (oh no, not again)

Quite frequently, someone on the internet discovers the Monty Hall paradox, and become so enthusiastic that it becomes urgent to publish an article – or a post – about it. The latest example can be http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-24045598. I won’t blame them, I did the same a few years ago (see http://freakonometrics.hypotheses.org/776, or http://freakonometrics.hypotheses.org/775, in French). My point today is that the Monty Hall paradox raise an important question, about information. How comes…

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So you’re moving to Baltimore

September 13, 2013
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Editor's Note: This post was written by Brian Caffo, occasional Simply Statistics contributor and Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Biostatistics at Johns Hopkins. This was written primarily for incoming graduate students, but if you're planning on moving … Continue reading →

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You heard it here first: Intense exercise can suppress appetite

September 13, 2013
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This post is by Phil Price. The New York Times recently ran an article entitled “How Exercise Can Help Us Eat Less,” which begins with this: “Strenuous exercise seems to dull the urge to eat afterward better than gentler workouts, several new studies show, adding to a growing body of science suggesting that intense exercise […]The post You heard it here first: Intense exercise can suppress appetite appeared first on…

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BCEA in UseR!

September 13, 2013
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BCEA in UseR!

In a recent post, I had hinted at big news for BCEA $-$ I thought it was pretty much a done deal, but because it wasn't yet set in stone, I didn't want to jinx it...But now I've sorted all the details with Springer, who have asked me to write...

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Swiss Jonah Lehrer

September 13, 2013
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Psychology researcher Chris Chabris writes: Rolf Dobelli, a Swiss writer, published a book called The Art of Thinking Clearly earlier this year with HarperCollins in the U.S. The book’s original German edition was a #1 bestseller, and the book has sold over one million copies worldwide. In perusing Mr. Dobelli’s book, we noticed several familiar-sounding […]The post Swiss Jonah Lehrer appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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MCMSki IV, Jan. 6-8, 2014, Chamonix (news #8)

September 13, 2013
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MCMSki IV, Jan. 6-8, 2014, Chamonix (news #8)

A reposted item of news about MCMSki IV: as posted by Brad Carlin this afternoon to the Biometrics Section and Bayesian Statistical Science Section of the ASA, The fifth joint international meeting of the IMS (Institute of Mathematical Statistics) and ISBA (International Society for Bayesian Analysis), nicknamed “MCMSki IV”, will be held in Chamonix Mont-Blanc, […]

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The difference between frequencies and weights in regression analysis

September 13, 2013
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The difference between frequencies and weights in regression analysis

This week I read an interesting blog post that led to a discussion about specifying the frequencies of observations in a regression model. In SAS software, many of the analysis procedures contain a FREQ statement for specifying frequencies and a WEIGHT statement for specifying weights in a weighted regression. Theis [...]

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Samplers for Big Science: emcee and BAT

September 12, 2013
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Over the past few months, we’ve talked about modeling with particle physicists (Allen Caldwell), astrophysicists (David Hogg, who regularly comments here), and climate and energy usage modelers (Phil Price, who regularly posts here). Big Science Black Boxes We’ve gotten pretty much the same story from all of them: their models involve “big science” components that […]The post Samplers for Big Science: emcee and BAT appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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Do you ever have that I-just-fit-a-model feeling?

September 12, 2013
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Didier Ruedin writes: Here’s something I’ve been wondering for a while, and I thought your blog might be the right place to get the views from a wider group, too. How would you describe that feeling when—after going through the theory, collecting data, specifying the model, perhaps debugging the code—you hit enter and get the […]The post Do you ever have that I-just-fit-a-model feeling? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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Does Mayo’s “Error Statistics” fix classical statistics?

September 12, 2013
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Taking a break from Statistical Mechanics I noticed Corey Yanofsky, whom I respect a great deal, is starting a blog. Corey plans to explore Dr. Mayo’s Severity Principle, which he describes as the “strongest defense of frequentism I’ve ev...

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Visualization of Metropolis with rejected proposals

September 12, 2013
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Visualization of Metropolis with rejected proposals

In response to a previous post, Tinu Schneider has embellished the Metropolis visualization of Maxwell Joseph so it includes explicit plotting of rejected proposals (shown as grey segments). Here are the animated gif and R code. Many thanks to Tinu for...

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Help needed for establishing an ASA statistical genetics and genomics section

September 12, 2013
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To promote research and education in statistical genetics and genomics, some of us in the community would like to establish a statistical genetics and genomics section of the American Statistical Association (ASA). Having an ASA section gives us certain advantages, … Continue reading →

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Variables aléatoires discrètes

September 12, 2013
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Suite du cours ACT2121, de préparation pour l’examen P de la SOA (probability). Un nouveau jeu d’exercices, sur les thèmes 4-5 (tel que classifié dans le livre de Jacques Labelle, qui servira de référence pour ce cours) Formule de la probabilité totale, et formule de Bayes, #4, et lois discrètes #5 ACT2121-A2013-45.pdf On fera des exercices sur la loi de Poisson la semaine prochaine, et l’intra du 27 septembre portera sur les…

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Recently in the sister blog

September 12, 2013
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Don’t be so quick to place politicians’ views of “national interests” above the mood of the publicMore on those pollsters who apparently throw away completed survey responsesA theory of the importance of Very Serious People in the Democratic Pa...

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Numbersense Pros: Interview with Andrew Gelman

September 12, 2013
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Numbersense Pros: Interview with Andrew Gelman

Professor Andrew Gelman is a pioneer in statistics blogging. His blog is one of my regular reads, a mixture of theoretical pieces, applied work, psychological musing, rants about unethical academics, advocacy of statistical graphics, and commentary on literature. He's one of the few statisticians who gets opinion pieces published in the New York Times. His expertise is statistics in politics, but I also enjoy his work on the stop-and-frisk policies…

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