Category: Tutorials

WVPlots 1.1.2 on CRAN

I have put a new release of the WVPlots package up on CRAN. This release adds palette and/or color controls to most of the plotting functions in the package. WVPlots was originally a catch-all package of ggplot2 visualizations that we at Win-Vector tended to use repeatedly, and wanted to turn into “one-liners.” A consequence of … Continue reading WVPlots 1.1.2 on CRAN

New Getting Started with vtreat Documentation

Win Vector LLC‘s Dr. Nina Zumel has just released some new vtreat documentation. vtreat is a an all-in one step data preparation system that helps defend your machine learning algorithms from: Missing values Large cardinality categorical variables Novel levels from categorical variables I hoped she could get the Python vtreat documentation up to parity with … Continue reading New Getting Started with vtreat Documentation

Introducing data_algebra

This article introduces the data_algebra project: a data processing tool family available in R and Python. These tools are designed to transform data either in-memory or on remote databases. In particular we will discuss the Python implementation (also called data_algebra) and its relation to the mature R implementations (rquery and rqdatatable). Introduction Parts of the … Continue reading Introducing data_algebra

What is vtreat?

vtreat is a DataFrame processor/conditioner that prepares real-world data for supervised machine learning or predictive modeling in a statistically sound manner. vtreat takes an input DataFrame that has a specified column called “the outcome variable” (or “y”) that is the quantity to be predicted (and must not have missing values). Other input columns are possible … Continue reading What is vtreat?

Returning to Tides

Fred Viole shared a great “data only” R solution to the forecasting tides problem. The methodology comes from a finance perspective, and has some great associated notes and articles. This gives me a chance to comment on the odd relation between prediction and profit in finance. If there really was a trade-able item with low … Continue reading Returning to Tides

Lord Kelvin, Data Scientist

In 1876 A. Légé & Co., 20 Cross Street, Hatton Gardens, London completed the first “tide calculating machine” for William Thomson (later Lord Kelvin) (ref). Thomson’s (Lord Kelvin) First Tide Predicting Machine, 1876 The results were plotted on the paper cylinders, and one literally “turned the crank” to perform the calculations. The tide calculating machine … Continue reading Lord Kelvin, Data Scientist

My Favorite data.table Feature

My favorite R data.table feature is the “by” grouping notation when combined with the := notation.
Let’s take a look at this powerful notation.

First, let’s build an example data.frame.

d <- wrapr::build_frame(
"gr…

Free Video Lecture: Vectors for Programmers and Data Scientists

We have just released two new free video lectures on vectors from a programmer’s point of view. I am experimenting with what ideas do programmers find interesting about vectors, what concepts do they consider safe starting points, and how to condense and present the material. Please check the lectures out. Vectors for Programmers and Data … Continue reading Free Video Lecture: Vectors for Programmers and Data Scientists