The evolution of pace in popular movies

James Cutting writes: Movies have changed dramatically over the last 100 years. Several of these changes in popular English-language filmmaking practice are reflected in patterns of film style as distributed over the length of movies. In particular, arrangements of shot durations, motion, and luminance have altered and come to reflect aspects of the narrative form. […]

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Stephen Senn: On the level. Why block structure matters and its relevance to Lord’s paradox (Guest Post)

Stephen Senn Consultant Statistician Edinburgh Introduction In a previous post I considered Lord’s paradox from the perspective of the ‘Rothamsted School’ and its approach to the analysis of experiments. I now illustrate this in some detail giving an example. What I shall do I have simulated data from an experiment in which two diets have […]

“She also observed that results from smaller studies conducted by NGOs – often pilot studies – would often look promising. But when governments tried to implement scaled-up versions of those programs, their performance would drop considerably.”

Robert Wiblin writes: If we have a study on the impact of a social program in a particular place and time, how confident can we be that we’ll get a similar result if we study the same program again somewhere else? Dr Eva Vivalt . . . compiled a huge database of impact evaluations in […]

The post “She also observed that results from smaller studies conducted by NGOs – often pilot studies – would often look promising. But when governments tried to implement scaled-up versions of those programs, their performance would drop considerably.” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

A Bayesian take on ballot order effects

Dale Lehman sends along a paper, “The ballot order effect is huge: Evidence from Texas,” by Darren Grant, which begins: Texas primary and runoff elections provide an ideal test of the ballot order hypothesis, because ballot order is randomized within each county and there are many counties and contests to analyze. Doing so for all […]

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SIST* Posts: Excerpts & Mementos (to Nov 17, 2018)

SIST* BLOG POSTS (up to Nov 17, 2018) Excerpts 05/19: The Meaning of My Title: Statistical Inference as Severe Testing: How to Get Beyond the Statistics Wars 09/08: Excursion 1 Tour I: Beyond Probabilism and Performance: Severity Requirement (1.1) 09/11: Excursion 1 Tour I (2nd stop): Probabilism, Performance, and Probativeness (1.2) 09/15: Excursion 1 Tour I (3rd stop): […]