Category: Statistics

What to do when your measured outcome doesn’t quite line up with what you’re interested in?

Matthew Poes writes: I’m writing a research memo discussing the importance of precisely aligning the outcome measures to the intervention activities. I’m making the point that an evaluation of the outcomes for a given intervention may net null results for many reasons, one of which could simply be that you are looking in the wrong […]

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Don’t get fooled by observational correlations

Gabriel Power writes: Here’s something a little different: clever classrooms, according to which physical characteristics of classrooms cause greater learning. And the effects are large! Moving from the worst to the best design implies a gain of 67% of one year’s worth of learning! Aside from the dubiously large effect size, it looks like the […]

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Columbia Data Science Institute art contest

This is a great idea! Unfortunately, only students at Columbia can submit. I encourage other institutions to do such contests too. We did something similar at Columbia, maybe 10 or 15 years ago? It went well, we just didn’t have the energy to do it again every year, as we’d initially planned. So I’m very […]

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Excursion 1 Tour I (3rd stop): The Current State of Play in Statistical Foundations: A View From a Hot-Air Balloon (1.3)

How can a discipline, central to science and to critical thinking, have two methodologies, two logics, two approaches that frequently give substantively different answers to the same problems? … Is complacency in the face of contradiction acceptable for a central discipline of science? (Donald Fraser 2011, p. 329) We [statisticians] are not blameless … we […]

High-profile statistical errors occur in the physical sciences too, it’s not just a problem in social science.

In an email with subject line, “Article full of forking paths,” John Williams writes: I thought you might be interested in this article by John Sabo et al., which was the cover article for the Dec. 8 issue of Science. The article is dumb in various ways, some of which are described in the technical […]

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Echo Chamber Incites Online Mob to Attack Math Profs

The story starts as follows: There’s evidence for greater variability in the distribution of men, compared to women, in various domains. Two math professors, Theodore Hill and Sergei Tabachnikov, wrote an article exploring a mathematical model for the evolution of this difference in variation, and send the article to the Mathematical Intelligencer, a magazine that […]

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N=1 survey tells me Cynthia Nixon will lose by a lot (no joke)

Yes, you can learn a lot from N=1, as long as you have some auxiliary information. The other day I was talking with a friend who’s planning to vote for Andrew Cuomo in the primary. What about Cynthia Nixon? My friend wasn’t even considering voting for her. Now, my friend is, I think, in the […]

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Discussion of effects of growth mindset: Let’s not demand unrealistic effect sizes.

Shreeharsh Kelkar writes: As a regular reader of your blog, I wanted to ask you if you had taken a look at the recent debate about growth mindset [see earlier discussions here and here] that happened on theconversation.com. Here’s the first salvo by Brooke McNamara, and then the response by Carol Dweck herself. The debate […]

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Against Arianism 2: Arianism Grande

“There’s the part you’ve braced yourself against, and then there’s the other part” – The Mountain Goats My favourite genre of movie is Nicole Kidman in a questionable wig. (Part of the sub-genre founded by Sarah Paulson, who is the patron saint of obvious wigs.) And last night I was in the same room* as […]

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Narcolepsy Could Be ‘Sleeper Effect’ in Trump and Brexit Campaigns

Kevin Lewis sent along this example of what in social science is called the “ecological fallacy”: UNDER EMBARGO UNTIL MARCH 8, 2018 AT 10 AM EST Media Contact: Public and Media Relations Manager Society for Personality and Social Psychology press@spsp.org Narcolepsy Could Be ‘Sleeper Effect’ in Trump and Brexit Campaigns Regions where voters have more […]

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