Category: Statistics

Researchers.one: A souped-up Arxiv with pre- and post-publication review

Harry Crane and Ryan Martin write: I’m writing to call your attention to a new peer review and publication platform, called RESEARCHERS.ONE, that I have recently launched with Ryan Martin. The platform can be found at https://www.researchers.one. Given past discussions I’ve seen on your website, I think this new platform might interest you and your […]

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What if a big study is done and nobody reports it?

Paul Alper writes: Your blog often contains criticisms of articles which get too much publicity. Here is an instance of the obverse (inverse? reverse?) where a worthy publication dealing with a serious medical condition is virtually ignored. From Michael Joyce at the ever-reliable and informative Healthnewsreview.org: Prostate cancer screening: massive study gets minimal coverage. Why? […]

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“It’s Always Sunny in Correlationville: Stories in Science,” or, Science should not be a game of Botticelli

There often seems to be an attitude among scientists and journal editors that, if a research team has gone to the trouble of ensuring rigor in some part of their study (whether in the design, the data collection, or the analysis, but typically rigor is associated with “p less than .05” and some random assignment […]

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Bothered by non-monotonicity? Here’s ONE QUICK TRICK to make you happy.

We’re often modeling non-monotonic functions. For example, performance at just about any task increases with age (babies can’t do much!) and then eventually decreases (dead people can’t do much either!). Here’s an example from a few years ago: A function g(x) that increases and then decreases can be modeled by a quadratic, or some more […]

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“Dynamically Rescaled Hamiltonian Monte Carlo for Bayesian Hierarchical Models”

Aki points us to this paper by Tore Selland Kleppe, which begins: Dynamically rescaled Hamiltonian Monte Carlo (DRHMC) is introduced as a computationally fast and easily implemented method for performing full Bayesian analysis in hierarchical statistical models. The method relies on introducing a modified parameterisation so that the re-parameterised target distribution has close to constant […]

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The gaps between 1, 2, and 3 are just too large.

Someone who wishes to remain anonymous points to a new study of David Yeager et al. on educational mindset interventions (link from Alex Tabarrok) and asks: On the blog we talk a lot about bad practice and what not to do. Might this be an example of how *to do* things? Or did they just […]

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