Statistics

Statistics Blogs

The Series of Unsurprising Results in Economics (SURE)

June 6, 2018
By
The Series of Unsurprising Results in Economics (SURE)

Andrea Menclover of the University of Canterbury (New Zealand) has recently founded the SURE Journal, whose aims and scope are as follows:'The Series of Unsurprising Results in Economics (SURE) is an e-journal of high-quality research with “unsurpris...

Read more »

rqdatatable: rquery Powered by data.table

June 3, 2018
By
rqdatatable: rquery Powered by data.table

rquery is an R package for specifying data transforms using piped Codd-style operators. It has already shown great performance on PostgreSQL and Apache Spark. rqdatatable is a new package that supplies a screaming fast implementation of the rquery system in-memory using the data.table package. rquery is already one of the fastest and most teachable (due … Continue reading rqdatatable: rquery Powered by data.table

Read more »

Monadic probabilistic programming in Scala with Rainier

June 1, 2018
By
Monadic probabilistic programming in Scala with Rainier

Introduction Rainier is an interesting new probabilistic programming library for Scala recently open-sourced by Stripe. Probabilistic programming languages provide a computational framework for building and fitting Bayesian models to data. There are many interesting probabilistic programming languages, and there is currently a lot of interesting innovation happening with probabilistic programming languages embedded in strongly typed … Continue reading Monadic probabilistic programming in Scala with Rainier

Read more »

Computing extreme normal tail probabilities

June 1, 2018
By
Computing extreme normal tail probabilities

Let me say up front that relying on the normal distribution as an accurate model of extreme events is foolish under most circumstances. The main reason to calculate the probability of, say, a 40 sigma event is to show how absurd it is to talk about 40 sigma events. See my previous post on six-sigma […]

Read more »

Talking about clinical significance

June 1, 2018
By

In statistical work in the age of big data we often get hung up on differences that are statistically significant (reliable enough to show up again and again in repeated measurements), but clinically insignificant (visible in aggregation, but too small to make any real difference to individuals). An example would be: a diet that changes … Continue reading Talking about clinical significance

Read more »

Suggested Reading for June

June 1, 2018
By
Suggested Reading for June

Colussi, T., 2018. Social ties in academia: A friend is a treasure. Review of Economics and Statistics, 100, 45-50.Dette, H., K. Möllenhoff, S. Volgushev, & F. Bretz, 2018. Equivalence of regression curves. Journal of the American Statistical Asso...

Read more »

Suggested Reading for June

June 1, 2018
By
Suggested Reading for June

Colussi, T., 2018. Social ties in academia: A friend is a treasure. Review of Economics and Statistics, 100, 45-50.Dette, H., K. Möllenhoff, S. Volgushev, & F. Bretz, 2018. Equivalence of regression curves. Journal of the American Statistical Asso...

Read more »

Six sigma events

May 31, 2018
By
Six sigma events

I saw on Twitter this afternoon a paraphrase of a quote from Nassim Taleb to the effect that if you see a six-sigma event, that’s evidence that it wasn’t really a six-sigma event. What does that mean? Six sigma means six standard deviations away from the mean of a probability distribution, sigma (σ) being the […]

Read more »

The Uniqueness of the Cointegrating Vector

May 31, 2018
By
The Uniqueness of the Cointegrating Vector

Suppose that we have (only) two non-stationary time-series, X1t and X2t (t = 1, 2, 3, .....). More specifically, suppose that both of these series are integrated of order one (i.e., I(1)). Then there are two possibilities - either X1 and X2 are co...

Read more »

The Uniqueness of the Cointegrating Vector

May 31, 2018
By
The Uniqueness of the Cointegrating Vector

Suppose that we have (only) two non-stationary time-series, X1t and X2t (t = 1, 2, 3, .....). More specifically, suppose that both of these series are integrated of order one (i.e., I(1)). Then there are two possibilities - either X1 and X2 are co...

Read more »


Subscribe

Email:

  Subscribe