Posts Tagged ‘ Public Health ’

Freelance orphans: “33 comparisons, 4 are statistically significant: much more than the 1.65 that would be expected by chance alone, so what’s the problem??”

October 16, 2017
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From someone who would prefer to remain anonymous: As you may know, the relatively recent “orphan drug” laws allow (basically) companies that can prove an off-patent drug treats an otherwise untreatable illness, to obtain intellectual property protection for otherwise generic or dead drugs. This has led to a new business of trying large numbers of […] The post Freelance orphans: “33 comparisons, 4 are statistically significant: much more than the…

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Does racquetball save lives?

October 12, 2017
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Asher Meir points to this news report and writes: 8e5 people in study, about half reported exercising, about half not. About 10% died overall. So overall death rate difference of 28% is pretty remarkable. It means about 3500 deaths instead of 4500 for a similar sample size. But when you compare the rate of heart […] The post Does racquetball save lives? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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Apply for the Earth Institute Postdoc at Columbia and work with us!

September 30, 2017
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The Earth Institute at Columbia brings in several postdocs each year—it’s a two-year gig—and some of them have been statisticians (recently, Kenny Shirley, Leontine Alkema, Shira Mitchell, and Milad Kharratzadeh). We’re particularly interested in statisticians who have research interests in development and public health. It’s fine—not just fine, but ideal—if you are interested in statistical […] The post Apply for the Earth Institute Postdoc at Columbia and work with us!…

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For mortality rate junkies

September 30, 2017
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Paul Ginsparg and I were discussing that mortality rate adjustment example. I pointed him to this old tutorial that laid out the age adjustment step by step, and he sent along this: For mortality rate junkies, here’s another example [by Steven Martin and Laudan Aron] of bundled stats lending to misinterpretation, in this case not […] The post For mortality rate junkies appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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Type M errors studied in the wild

September 15, 2017
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Brendan Nyhan points to this article, “Very large treatment effects in randomised trials as an empirical marker to indicate whether subsequent trials are necessary: meta-epidemiological assessment,” by Myura Nagendran, Tiago Pereira, Grace Kiew, Douglas Altman, Mahiben Maruthappu, John Ioannidis, and Peter McCulloch. From the abstract: Objective To examine whether a very large effect (VLE; defined […] The post Type M errors studied in the wild appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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Causal inference using data from a non-representative sample

September 14, 2017
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Dan Gibbons writes: I have been looking at using synthetic control estimates for estimating the effects of healthcare policies, particularly because for say county-level data the nontreated comparison units one would use in say a difference-in-differences estimator or quantile DID estimator (if one didn’t want to use the mean) are not especially clear. However, given […] The post Causal inference using data from a non-representative sample appeared first on Statistical…

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We were unfair to traditional pollsters

September 8, 2017
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A couple days ago, Slate ran an article by David Rothschild and myself, “We Need to Move Beyond Election-Focused Polling,” in which we wrote about various aspects of the future of opinion surveys. One aspect of this article was misleading. We wrote: And instead of zeroing in on elections, we should think of polling and […] The post We were unfair to traditional pollsters appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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Rosenbaum (1999): Choice as an Alternative to Control in Observational Studies

September 4, 2017
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Winston Lin wrote in a blog comment earlier this year: Paul Rosenbaum’s 1999 paper “Choice as an Alternative to Control in Observational Studies” is really thoughtful and well-written. The comments and rejoinder include an interesting exchange between Manski and Rosenbaum on external validity and the role of theories. And here it is. Rosenbaum begins: In […] The post Rosenbaum (1999): Choice as an Alternative to Control in Observational Studies appeared…

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All cause and breast cancer specific mortality, by assignment to mammography or control

September 2, 2017
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All cause and breast cancer specific mortality, by assignment to mammography or control

Paul Alper writes: You might be interested in the robocall my wife received today from our Medicare Advantage organization (UCARE Minnesota). The robocall informed us that mammograms saved lives and was available free of charge as part of her health insurance. No mention of recent studies criticizing mammography regarding false positives, harms of biopsies, etc. […] The post All cause and breast cancer specific mortality, by assignment to mammography or…

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What are best practices for observational studies?

August 30, 2017
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Mark Samuel Tuttle writes: Just returned from the annual meeting of the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA); in attendance were many from Columbia. One subtext of conversations I had with the powers that be in the field is the LACK of Best Practices for Observational Studies. They all agree that however difficult they are that […] The post What are best practices for observational studies? appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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