Posts Tagged ‘ art ’

Planet of the hominids? We wanna see this exposition.

November 6, 2017
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It would be interesting if someone were to make an exhibit for a museum showing the timeline of humans and hominids, and under that showing children’s toys and literature, showing how these guys were represented in popular media. It probably already exists, right? P.S. I feel kinda bad that this bumped Dan’s more important, statistically-related […] The post Planet of the hominids? We wanna see this exposition. appeared first on…

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The fractal zealots

August 1, 2017
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Paul Alper points to this news report by Ian Sample, which goes: Psychologists believe they can identify progressive changes in work of artists who went on to develop Alzheimer’s disease The first subtle hints of cognitive decline may reveal themselves in an artist’s brush strokes many years before dementia is diagnosed, researchers believe. . . […] The post The fractal zealots appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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The art of contaminating data

June 5, 2017
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The art of contaminating data

Kaiser Fung, founder of Junk Charts and Principal Analytics Prep, looks at how art can contaminate data in a data visualization.

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Applying statistics in science will likely remain unreasonably difficult in my life time: but I have no intention of changing careers.

March 8, 2017
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Applying statistics in science will likely remain unreasonably difficult in my life time: but I have no intention of changing careers.

This post is by Keith.   (Image from deviantart.com) There are a couple posts I have been struggling to put together, one is on what science is or should be (drawing on Charles Peirce). The other is on why a posterior is not a posterior is not a posterior: even if mathematically equivalent – they are […] The post Applying statistics in science will likely remain unreasonably difficult in my life…

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Light entertainment: Making art by making data

February 23, 2017
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Light entertainment: Making art by making data

Chris P. sent in this link to a Wired feature on "infographics." The first entry is by Giorgia Lupi and Stefanie Posavec. These are fun images and I enjoy looking at it as hand-drawn art. But it's a stretch to...

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What’s powdery and comes out of a metallic-green cardboard can?

December 18, 2016
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What’s powdery and comes out of a metallic-green cardboard can?

This (by Jason Torchinsky, from Stay Free magazine, around 1998?) is just hilarious. We used to have both those shake-out-the-powder cans, Comet and that parmesan cheese, in our house when I was growing up. The post What’s powdery and comes out...

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I’m only adding new posts when they’re important . . . and this one’s really important.

November 23, 2016
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I’m only adding new posts when they’re important . . . and this one’s really important.

Durf Humphries writes: I’m a fact-checker and digital researcher in Atlanta. Your blog has been quite useful to me this week. Your statistics and explanations are impressive, but the decision to ornament your articles with such handsome cats? That’s divine genius and it’s apparent that these are not random cats, but carefully curated critters that […] The post I’m only adding new posts when they’re important . . . and…

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Mapping the two Americas

November 17, 2016
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Mapping the two Americas

If you type "two Americas map" into Google image search, you get the following top results: Designers overwhelmingly pick the choropleth map as the way to depitct the two nations. Now, look at these maps from the New York Times...

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It’s not about the snobbery, it’s all about reality: At last, I finally understand hatred of “middlebrow”

October 3, 2016
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I remember reading Dwight Macdonald and others slamming “middlebrows” and thinking, what’s the point? The classic argument from the 1940s onward was to say that true art (James Joyce etc) was ok, and true mass culture (Mickey Mouse and detective stories) were cool, but anything in the middle (John Marquand, say) was middlebrow and deserved […] The post It’s not about the snobbery, it’s all about reality: At last, I…

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Hokey mas, indeed

September 9, 2016
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Hokey mas, indeed

Paul Alper writes: The pictures which often accompany your blog are really “inside baseball” and I frequently fail to see the connection to the accompanying text. For example, when I click on today’s picture, I get: This happens to interest me because our granddaughter, who is now two years old and attends a Spanish-speaking daycare, […] The post Hokey mas, indeed appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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