Blog Archives

One of the worst infographics ever, but people don’t care?

August 28, 2014
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One of the worst infographics ever, but people don’t care?

This post is by Phil Price. Perhaps prompted by the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, this infographic has been making the rounds: I think this is one of the worst I have ever seen. I don’t know where it came from, so I can’t give credit/blame where it’s due. Let’s put aside the numbers themselves – […] The post One of the worst infographics ever, but people don’t care? appeared first…

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As if we needed another example of lying with statistics and not issuing a correction: bike-share injuries

June 17, 2014
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This post is by Phil Price A Washington Post article says “In the first study of its kind, researchers from Washington State University and elsewhere found  a 14 percent greater risk of head injuries to cyclists associated with cities that have bike share programs. In fact, when they compared raw head injury data for cyclists […] The post As if we needed another example of lying with statistics and not…

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If you have a 45% chance of winning, is it “yours to lose”?

June 11, 2014
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Nate Silver gives Brazil a 45% chance of winning the World Cup, with only Argentina and Germany having more than a 10% chance. My gut feeling is that that’s a bit high, but I’m no expert. What I find striking, though, is that the headline says it’s “Brazil’s to lose.” Huh? If we take Silver’s […] The post If you have a 45% chance of winning, is it “yours to…

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plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose

May 20, 2014
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This post is by Phil, and I’m writing about the slow pace of change in 21st-century America. [Note added later: at the time that I wrote this, I was unaware that a year-and-a-half ago Andrew had written a similar post on the theme. I suspect I, and perhaps most of this blog's readers, missed it […] The post plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose appeared first on Statistical…

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Everything I need to know about Bayesian statistics, I learned in eight schools.

January 21, 2014
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This post is by Phil. I’m aware that there are some people who use a Bayesian approach largely because it allows them to provide a highly informative prior distribution based subjective judgment, but that is not the appeal of Bayesian methods for a lot of us practitioners. It’s disappointing and surprising, twenty years after my initial experiences, […]The post Everything I need to know about Bayesian statistics, I learned in eight schools.…

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You heard it here first: Intense exercise can suppress appetite

September 13, 2013
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This post is by Phil Price. The New York Times recently ran an article entitled “How Exercise Can Help Us Eat Less,” which begins with this: “Strenuous exercise seems to dull the urge to eat afterward better than gentler workouts, several new studies show, adding to a growing body of science suggesting that intense exercise […]The post You heard it here first: Intense exercise can suppress appetite appeared first on…

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There are no fat sprinters

June 18, 2013
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This post is by Phil. A little over three years ago I wrote a post about exercise and weight loss in which I described losing a fair amount of weight due to (I believe) an exercise regime, with no effort to change my diet; this contradicted the prediction of studies that had recently been released. [...]The post There are no fat sprinters appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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The Great Race

April 29, 2013
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This post is by Phil. Last summer my wife and I took a 3.5-month vacation that included a wide range of activities. When I got back, people would ask “what were the highlights or your trip?”, and I was somewhat at a loss: we had done so many things that were so different, many of [...]The post The Great Race appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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Data problems, coding errors…what can be done?

April 17, 2013
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This post is by Phil A recent post on this blog discusses a prominent case of an Excel error leading to substantially wrong results from a statistical analysis. Excel is notorious for this because it is easy to add a row or column of data (or intermediate results) but forget to update equations so that [...]The post Data problems, coding errors…what can be done? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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Subsidized driving

January 25, 2013
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This post is by Phil. This DC Streets Blog post gives a concise summary of a report by “The Tax Foundation”. The money shot is here, a table that shows what fraction spending on roads in each state in the U.S. is covered by local, state, and federal gas taxes, tolls, registration fees, etc. (Click [...]

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