Posts Tagged ‘ Travel ’

A promising infographic about motorcycle helmets

April 3, 2014
By
A promising infographic about motorcycle helmets

The New York Times graphics team shows us how to do infographics poster the right way. They recently put up a feature showing how the repeal of helmet laws is linked to increasing vehicle fatalities. The graphic is here. One...

Read more »

Approximate Bayesian model choice

March 16, 2014
By
Approximate Bayesian model choice

The above is the running head of the arXived paper with full title “Implications of  uniformly distributed, empirically informed priors for phylogeographical model selection: A reply to Hickerson et al.” by Oaks, Linkem and Sukuraman. That I (again) read in the plane to Montréal (third one in this series!, and last because I also watched […]

Read more »

where did the normalising constants go?! [part 2]

March 11, 2014
By
where did the normalising constants go?! [part 2]

Coming (swiftly and smoothly) back home after this wonderful and intense week in Banff, I hugged my loved ones,  quickly unpacked, ran a washing machine, and  then sat down to check where and how my reasoning was wrong. To start with, I experimented with a toy example in R: and (of course!) it produced the […]

Read more »

where did the normalising constants go?! [part 1]

March 10, 2014
By
where did the normalising constants go?! [part 1]

When listening this week to several talks in Banff handling large datasets or complex likelihoods by parallelisation, splitting the posterior as and handling each term of this product on a separate processor or thread as proportional to a probability density, then producing simulations from the mi‘s and attempting at deriving simulations from the original product, […]

Read more »

Oldie but goodie

February 3, 2014
By
Oldie but goodie

Back in 2007, the New York Times graphics team produced a fabulous chart explaining the rise in prices at the pump (link). Let's start with the tab labeled "Regional Price" which contains a well-executed map of the average gas prices...

Read more »

MCMSki IV [mistakes and regrets]

January 12, 2014
By
MCMSki IV [mistakes and regrets]

Now that the conference and the Bayesian non-parametric satellite workshop (thanks to Judith!) are over, with (almost) everyone back home, and that the post-partum conference blues settles in (!), I can reflect on how things ran for those meetings and what I could have done to improve them… (Not yet considering to propose a second […]

Read more »

MCMSki IV [day 3]

January 8, 2014
By
MCMSki IV [day 3]

Already on the final day..! And still this frustration in being unable to attend three sessions at once… Andrew Gelman started the day with a non-computational talk that broached on themes that are familiar to readers of his blog, on the misuse of significance tests and on recommendations for better practice. I then picked the […]

Read more »

MCMSki IV [day 1.5]

January 7, 2014
By
MCMSki IV [day 1.5]

The afternoon sessions I attended were “Computational and Methodological Challenges in evidence synthesis and multi-step” organised by Nicky Best and Sylvia Richardson and “Approximate inference” put together by Dan Simpson. Since both Nicky and Sylvia were alas unable to attend MCMSki, I chaired their session, which I found most interesting as connected to a recurrent […]

Read more »

Visualizing movements of people

January 6, 2014
By
Visualizing movements of people

Long-time reader Daniel L. sends in this chart illustrating a large data set of intra-state migration flows in the U.S. The original chart is at Vizynary by way of Daily Kos. *** There is no denying that this chart is...

Read more »

Unusual timing shows how random mass murder can be (or even less)

November 29, 2013
By
Unusual timing shows how random mass murder can be (or even less)

This post follows the original one on the headline of the USA Today I read during my flight to Toronto last month. I remind you that the unusual pattern was about observing four U.S. mass murders happening within four days, “for the first time in at least seven years”. Which means that the difference between […]

Read more »


Subscribe

Email:

  Subscribe