Blog Archives

A menagerie of messed up data analyses and how to avoid them

February 1, 2016
By
A menagerie of messed up data analyses and how to avoid them

Update: I realize this may seem like I'm picking on people. I really don't mean to, I have for sure made all of these mistakes and many more. I can give many examples, but the one I always remember is the time Rafa saved me from "I got a big one here" when I made

Read more »

On research parasites and internet mobs – let’s try to solve the real problem.

January 25, 2016
By

A couple of days ago one of the editors of the New England Journal of Medicine posted an editorial showing some moderate level of support for data sharing but also introducing the term "research parasite": A second concern held by some is that a new class of research person will emerge — people who had nothing

Read more »

A non-comprehensive list of awesome things other people did in 2015

December 21, 2015
By

Editor's Note: This is the third year I'm making a list of awesome things other people did this year. Just like the lists for 2013 and 2014 I am doing this off the top of my head.   I have avoided talking about stuff I worked on or that people here at Hopkins are doing

Read more »

Instead of research on reproducibility, just do reproducible research

December 11, 2015
By

Right now reproducibility, replicability, false positive rates, biases in methods, and other problems with science are the hot topic. As I mentioned in a previous post pointing out a flaw with a scientific study is way easier to do correctly than generating a new scientific study. Some folks have noticed that right now there is

Read more »

A thanksgiving dplyr Rubik’s cube puzzle for you

November 25, 2015
By

Nick Carchedi is back visiting from DataCamp and for fun we came up with a dplyr Rubik's cube puzzle. Here is how it works. To solve the puzzle you have to make a 4 x 3 data frame that spells Thanksgiving like this: View the code on Gist. To solve the puzzle you need to pipe this

Read more »

So you are getting crushed on the internet? The new normal for academics.

November 16, 2015
By

Roger and I were just talking about all the discussion around the Case and Deaton paper on death rates for middle class people. Andrew Gelman discussed it among many others. They noticed a potential bias in the analysis and did some re-analysis. Just yesterday an economist blogger wrote a piece about academics versus blogs and

Read more »

How I decide when to trust an R package

November 6, 2015
By
How I decide when to trust an R package

One thing that I've given a lot of thought to recently is the process that I use to decide whether I trust an R package or not. Kasper Hansen took a break from trolling me on Twitter to talk about how he trusts packages on Github less than packages that are on CRAN and particularly Bioconductor.

Read more »

Faculty/postdoc job opportunities in genomics across Johns Hopkins

October 30, 2015
By

It's pretty exciting to be in genomics at Hopkins right now with three new Bloomberg professors in genomics areas, a ton of stellar junior faculty, and a really fun group of students/postdocs. If you want to get in on the action here is a non-comprehensive list of great opportunities. Faculty Jobs Job: Multiple tenure track faculty positions in

Read more »

The statistics identity crisis: am I really a data scientist?

October 29, 2015
By
The statistics identity crisis: am I really a data scientist?

        Tl;dr: We will host a Google Hangout of our popular JSM session October 30th 2-4 PM EST.    I organized a session at JSM 2015 called "The statistics identity crisis: am I really a data scientist?" The session turned out to be pretty popular: Packed room of statisticians with identity crises

Read more »

A glass half full interpretation of the replicability of psychological science

October 1, 2015
By
A glass half full interpretation of the replicability of psychological science

tl;dr: 77% of replication effects from the psychology replication study were in (or above) the 95% prediction interval based on the original effect size. This isn't perfect and suggests (a) there is still room for improvement, (b) the scientists who did the replication study are pretty awesome at replicating, (c) we need a better definition of

Read more »


Subscribe

Email:

  Subscribe