Blog Archives

Interview with COPSS award Winner John Storey

August 25, 2015
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Interview with COPSS award Winner John Storey

  Editor's Note: We are again pleased to interview the COPSS President's award winner. The COPSS Award is one of the most prestigious in statistics, sometimes called the Nobel Prize in statistics. This year the award went to John Storey who also won the Mortimer Spiegelman award for his outstanding contribution to public health statistics.  This interview is

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Interview with Sherri Rose and Laura Hatfield

August 21, 2015
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Interview with Sherri Rose and Laura Hatfield

  Rose/Hatfield © Savannah Bergquist Laura Hatfield and Sherri Rose are Assistant Professors specializing in biostatistics at Harvard Medical School in the Department of Health Care Policy. Laura received her PhD in Biostatistics from the University of Minnesota and Sherri completed her PhD in Biostatistics at UC Berkeley. They are developing novel statistical methods for

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If you ask different questions you get different answers – one more way science isn’t broken it is just really hard

August 20, 2015
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If you ask different questions you get different answers – one more way science isn’t broken it is just really hard

If you haven't already read the amazing piece by Christie Aschwanden on why Science isn't Broken you should do so immediately. It does an amazing job of capturing the nuance of statistics as applied to real data sets and how that can be misconstrued as science being "broken" without falling for the easy "everything is wrong"

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P > 0.05? I can make any p-value statistically significant with adaptive FDR procedures

August 19, 2015
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P > 0.05? I can make any p-value statistically significant with adaptive FDR procedures

Everyone knows now that you have to correct for multiple testing when you calculate many p-values otherwise this can happen:   One of the most popular ways to correct for multiple testing is to estimate or control the false discovery rate. The false discovery rate attempts to quantify the fraction of made discoveries that are

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Interested in analyzing images of brains? Get started with open access data.

August 10, 2015
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Editor’s note: This is a guest post by Ani Eloyan. She is an Assistant Professor of Biostatistics at Brown University. Dr. Eloyan’s work focuses on semi-parametric likelihood based methods for matrix decompositions, statistical analyses of brain images, and the integration of various types of complex data structures for analyzing health care data. She received her

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Autonomous killing machines won’t look like the Terminator…and that is why they are so scary

July 30, 2015
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Autonomous killing machines won’t look like the Terminator…and that is why they are so scary

Just a few days ago many of the most incredible minds in science and technology urged governments to avoid using artificial intelligence to create autonomous killing machines. One thing that always happens when such a warning is put into place is you see the inevitable Terminator picture:     The reality is that robots that

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The statistics department Moneyball opportunity

July 17, 2015
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The statistics department Moneyball opportunity

Moneyball is a book and a movie about Billy Bean. It makes statisticians look awesome and I loved the movie. I loved it so much I’m putting the movie trailer right here: The basic idea behind Moneyball was that the Oakland Athletics were able to build a very successful baseball team on a tight budget by valuing

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Johns Hopkins Data Science Specialization Captsone 2 Top Performers

June 10, 2015
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Johns Hopkins Data Science Specialization Captsone 2 Top Performers

The second capstone session of the Johns Hopkins Data Science Specialization concluded recently. This time, we had 1,040 learners sign up to participate in the session, which again featured a project developed in collaboration with the amazingly innovative folks at SwiftKey.  We've identified the learners listed below as the top performers in this capstone session.

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I’m a data scientist – mind if I do surgery on your heart?

June 8, 2015
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There has been a lot of recent interest from scientific journals and from other folks in creating checklists for data science and data analysis. The idea is that the checklist will help prevent results that won't reproduce or replicate from the literature. One analogy that I'm frequently hearing is the analogy with checklists for surgeons that can

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Interview with Chris Wiggins, chief data scientist at the New York Times

June 1, 2015
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Editor's note: We are trying something a little new here and doing an interview with Google Hangouts on Air. The interview will be live at 11:30am EST. I have some questions lined up for Chris, but if you have others you'd like to ask, you can tweet them @simplystats and I'll see if I can

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