Author: Andrew

“Fudged statistics on the Iraq War death toll are still circulating today”

Mike Spagat shares this story entitled, “Fudged statistics on the Iraq War death toll are still circulating today,” which discusses problems with a paper published in a scientific journal in 2006, and errors that a reporter inadvertently included in a recent news article. Spagat writes: The Lancet could argue that if [Washington Post reporter Philip] […]

The post “Fudged statistics on the Iraq War death toll are still circulating today” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

“Ivy League Football Saw Large Reduction in Concussions After New Kickoff Rules”

I noticed this article in the newspaper today: A simple rule change in Ivy League football games has led to a significant drop in concussions, a study released this week found. After the Ivy League changed its kickoff rules in 2016, adjusting the kickoff and touchback lines by just five yards, the rate of concussions […]

The post “Ivy League Football Saw Large Reduction in Concussions After New Kickoff Rules” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

Strategic choice of where to vote in November

Darcy Kelley sends along a link to this site, Make My Vote Matter, in which you can enter two different addresses where you might vote, and it will tell you in which (if any) of these addresses has elections that are predicted to be close. The site is aimed at students; according to the site, […]

The post Strategic choice of where to vote in November appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

“Six Signs of Scientism”: where I disagree with Haack

I came across this article, “Six Signs of Scientism,” by philosopher Susan Haack from 2009. I think I’m in general agreement with Haack’s views—science has made amazing progress over the centuries but “like all human enterprises, science is ineradicably is fallible and imperfect. At best its progress is ragged, uneven, and unpredictable; moreover, much scientific […]

The post “Six Signs of Scientism”: where I disagree with Haack appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

David Weakliem points out that both economic and cultural issues can be more or less “moralized.”

David Weakliem writes: Thomas Edsall has a piece in which he cites a variety of work saying that Democratic and Republican voters are increasingly divided by values. He’s particularly concerned with “authoritarianism,” which is an interesting issue, but one I’ll save for another post. What I want to talk about here is the idea that […]

The post David Weakliem points out that both economic and cultural issues can be more or less “moralized.” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

“Moral cowardice requires choice and action.”

Commenter Chris G pointed out this quote from Ta-Nehisi Coates: Moral cowardice requires choice and action. It demands that its adherents repeatedly look away, that they favor the fanciful over the plain, myth over history, the dream over the real. Coates was writing about the defenders of the Confederate flag. Coates points to this quotation […]

The post “Moral cowardice requires choice and action.” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

Cool postdoc position in Arizona on forestry forecasting using tree ring models!

Margaret Evans sends in this cool job ad: Two-Year Post Doctoral Fellowship in Forest Ecological Forecasting, Data Assimilation A post-doctoral fellowship is available in the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research (University of Arizona) to work on an NSF Macrosystems Biology-funded project assimilating together tree-ring and forest inventory data to analyze patterns and drivers of forest productivity […]

The post Cool postdoc position in Arizona on forestry forecasting using tree ring models! appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

My talk tomorrow (Tues) 4pm in the Biomedical Informatics department (at 168th St)

The talk is 4-5pm in Room 200 on the 20th floor of the Presbyterian Hospital Building, Columbia University Medical Center. I’m not sure what I’m gonna talk about. It’ll depend on what people are interested in discussing. Here are some possible topics: – The failure of null hypothesis significance testing when studying incremental changes, and […]

The post My talk tomorrow (Tues) 4pm in the Biomedical Informatics department (at 168th St) appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

Bob Erikson on the 2018 Midterms

A couple months ago I wrote about party balancing in the midterm elections and pointed to the work of Joe Bafumi, Bob Erikson, and Chris Wlezien. Erikson recently sent me this note on the upcoming midterm elections: Donald Trump’s tumultuous presidency has sparked far more than the usual interest in the next midterm elections as […]

The post Bob Erikson on the 2018 Midterms appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.