Posts Tagged ‘ Significance ’

Is data privacy a fundamental right?

July 4, 2015
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This piece is part of the StatBusters column written jointly with Andrew Gelman. Hope they fix the labeling soon. In it, we talk about two recent studies on data privacy, which leads to contradictory conclusions. How should the media report such surveys? Is the brand name of the organization enough? In addition, we debunk the notion that consumers will definitely get something valuable out of sharing their data.

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Some statistics about nutrition statistics

May 26, 2015
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I only read nutrition studies in the service of this blog but otherwise, I don't trust them or care. Nevertheless, the health beat of most media outlets is obsessed with printing the latest research on coffee or eggs or fats or alcohol or what have you. Now, the estimable John Ioannidis has published an editorial in BMJ titled "Implausible Results in Human Nutrition Research". John previously told us about the…

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Story time, known unknowns and the endowment effect in an HBR article on customer data

May 6, 2015
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Story time, known unknowns and the endowment effect in an HBR article on customer data

Harvard Business Review devotes a long article to customer data privacy in the May issue (link). The article raises important issues, such as the low degree of knowledge about what data are being collected and traded, the value people place on their data privacy, and so on. In a separate post, I will discuss why I don't think the recommendations issued by the authors will resolve the issues they raised.…

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Gelman speed read

April 23, 2015
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For those who have found it tough to keep up with Andrew Gelman's prolificacy, here are some brief summaries of several recent posts: On people obsessed with proving the statistical significance of tiny effects: "they are trying to use a bathroom scale to weigh a feather—and the feather is resting loosely in the pouch of a kangaroo that is vigorously jumping up and down." (link) [I left a comment. In…

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Yet another popular nutrition headline doesn’t stand up to scrutiny

April 1, 2015
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Yet another popular nutrition headline doesn’t stand up to scrutiny

Are science journalists required to take one good statistics course? That is the question in my head when I read this Science Times article, titled "One Cup of Coffee Could Offset Three Drinks a Day" (link). We are used to seeing rather tenuous conclusions such as "Four Cups of Coffee Reduces Your Risk of X". This headline takes it up another notch. A result is claimed about the substitution effect…

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One place not to use the Sharpe ratio

March 23, 2015
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One place not to use the Sharpe ratio

Having worked in finance I am a public fan of the Sharpe ratio. I have written about this here and here. One thing I have often forgotten (driving some bad analyses) is: the Sharpe ratio isn’t appropriate for models of repeated events that already have linked mean and variance (such as Poisson or Binomial models) … Continue reading One place not to use the Sharpe ratio → Related posts: A…

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Optimizely Stats Engine 2: what about advanced users?

February 9, 2015
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Optimizely Stats Engine 2: what about advanced users?

In Part 1, I covered the logic behind recent changes to the statistical analysis used in standard reports by Optimizely. In Part 2, I ponder what this change means for more sophisticated customers--those who are following the proper protocols for classical design of experiments, such as running tests of predetermined sample sizes, adjusting for multiple comparisons, and constructing and analyzing multivariate tests using regression with interactions. For this segment, the…

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Deflate-gate, Part 2: not average != extreme, and Sunday talk shows

February 2, 2015
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Last week, I pointed out the futility of using data as proof or disproof in Deflate-gate. Emphatically, a case of "N=All" does not make things better. I later edited the post for HBR (link). In this post, I want to address a couple of more subtle technical issues related to the Sharp analysis, which can be summarized as follows: 1. New England is an outlier in the plays per fumbles…

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How Optimizely will kill your winning percentage, and why that is a great thing for you (Part 1)

January 23, 2015
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In my HBR article about A/B testing (link), I described one of the key managerial problems related to A/B testing--the surplus of “positive” results that don’t quite seem to add up. In particular, I mentioned this issue: When managers are reading hour-by-hour results, they will sometimes find large gaps between Groups A and B, and demand prompt reaction. Almost all such fluctuations result from temporary imbalance between the two groups,…

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Figuring out what data supports the argument, and what is just window-dressing

January 8, 2015
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Figuring out what data supports the argument, and what is just window-dressing

That is the question in my head when I read an article like USA Today's "Jobless Claims Fall, Suggests Strong Hiring". (link) The headline makes the connection between newly-released jobless claims data and the conclusion of "strong hiring". But it turns out the new data is merely window-dressing, and the conclusion is based on longer-term trends. Here is the new data, as reported by the USA Today reporter: applications for…

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