Posts Tagged ‘ ANOVA ’

Stop saying confidence intervals are "better" than p values

July 29, 2016
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Stop saying confidence intervals are "better" than p values

One of the common tropes one hears from advocates of confidence intervals is that they are superior, or should be preferred, to p values. In our paper "The Fallacy of Placing Confidence in Confidence Intervals", we outlined a number of interpretation p...

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Stop saying confidence intervals are "better" than p values

July 29, 2016
By
Stop saying confidence intervals are "better" than p values

One of the common tropes one hears from advocates of confidence intervals is that they are superior, or should be preferred, to p values. In our paper "The Fallacy of Placing Confidence in Confidence Intervals", we outlined a number of interpretation p...

Read more »

Asymmetric funnel plots without publication bias

January 9, 2016
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Asymmetric funnel plots without publication bias

In my last post about standardized effect sizes, I showed how averaging across trials before computing standardized effect sizes such as partial \(\eta^2\) and Cohen's d can produce arbitrary estimates of those quantities. This has drastic implications...

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Asymmetric funnel plots without publication bias

January 9, 2016
By
Asymmetric funnel plots without publication bias

In my last post about standardized effect sizes, I showed how averaging across trials before computing standardized effect sizes such as partial \(\eta^2\) and Cohen's d can produce arbitrary estimates of those quantities. This has drastic implications...

Read more »

Averaging can produce misleading standardized effect sizes

January 7, 2016
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Averaging can produce misleading standardized effect sizes

Recently, there have been many calls for a focus on effect sizes in psychological research. In this post, I discuss how naively using standardized effect sizes with averaged data can be misleading. This is particularly problematic for meta-analysis, where differences in number of trials across studies could lead to very misleading results.There are two main types of effect sizes in typical use: raw effect sizes and standardized effect sizes. Raw…

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Averaging can produce misleading standardized effect sizes

January 7, 2016
By
Averaging can produce misleading standardized effect sizes

Recently, there have been many calls for a focus on effect sizes in psychological research. In this post, I discuss how naively using standardized effect sizes with averaged data can be misleading. This is particularly problematic for meta-analysis, where differences in number of trials across studies could lead to very misleading results.There are two main types of effect sizes in typical use: raw effect sizes and standardized effect sizes. Raw…

Read more »

Potato Chips and ANOVA, Part 2: Using Analysis of Variance to Improve Sample Preparation in Analytical Chemistry

Potato Chips and ANOVA, Part 2: Using Analysis of Variance to Improve Sample Preparation in Analytical Chemistry

In this second article of a 2-part series on the official JMP blog, I use analysis of variance (ANOVA) to assess a sample-preparation scheme for quantifying sodium in potato chips.  I illustrate the use of the “Fit Y by X” platform in JMP to implement ANOVA, and I propose an alternative sample-preparation scheme to obtain […]

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Potato Chips and ANOVA in Analytical Chemistry – Part 1: Formatting Data in JMP

Potato Chips and ANOVA in Analytical Chemistry – Part 1: Formatting Data in JMP

I am very excited to write again for the official JMP blog as a guest blogger!  Today, the first article of a 2-part series has been published, and it is called “Potato Chips and ANOVA in Analytical Chemistry – Part 1: Formatting Data in JMP“.  This series of blog posts will talk about analysis of […]

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The fallacy of placing confidence in confidence intervals (version 2)

April 21, 2015
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I, with my coathors, have submitted a new draft of our paper "The fallacy of placing confidence in confidence intervals". This paper is substantially modified from its previous incarnation. Here is the main argument:"[C]onfidence intervals may not be u...

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Multiple Comparisons with BayesFactor, Part 2 – order restrictions

January 18, 2015
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Multiple Comparisons with BayesFactor, Part 2 – order restrictions

In my previous post, I described how to do multiple comparisons using the BayesFactor package. Part 1 concentrated on testing equality constraints among effects: for instance, that the the effects of two factor levels are equal, while leaving the third free to be different. In this second part, I will describe how to test order restrictions on factor level effects. This post will be a little more involved than the…

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