3 YEARS AGO (AUGUST 2012): MEMORY LANE

August 24, 2015
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3 YEARS AGO (AUGUST 2012): MEMORY LANE

3 years ago… MONTHLY MEMORY LANE: 3 years ago: August 2012. I mark in red three posts that seem most apt for general background on key issues in this blog.[1] Posts that are part of a “unit” or a group of “U-Phils” count as one (there are 4 U-Phils on Wasserman this time). Monthly memory lanes began at the blog’s 3-year anniversary in Sept, […]

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Statbusters: To divide or not to divide by 365

August 24, 2015
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In the newest column for the Daily Beast, Andrew and I look at the media's fascination with expressing large numbers as daily numbers. (link) In short, you should divide by 365 only when the metric actually scales with time, and be careful if the metric is not evenly distributed across time. We discuss the following headlines: "Air pollution is China is killing 4,000 per day" and "Periscope users view 40…

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From Quantity to Quality

August 24, 2015
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From Quantity to Quality

Open Data is a much-debated topic and – since the Obama administration launched Data.gov on May 21, 2009 – an international competition, too. Nearly 400 Open-Data Portals emerged meanwhile. But very often there is more concern about the number of published data than about the content of these data. GODI This issue has been addressed by … Continue reading From Quantity to Quality

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From Quantity to Quality

August 24, 2015
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From Quantity to Quality

Open Data is a much-debated topic and – since the Obama administration launched Data.gov on May 21, 2009 – an international competition, too. Nearly 400 Open-Data Portals emerged meanwhile. But very often there is more concern about the number of published data than about the content of these data. GODI This issue has been addressed by … Continue reading From Quantity to Quality

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“The belief was so strong that it trumped the evidence before them.”

August 24, 2015
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I was reading Palko on the 5 cent cup of coffee and spotted this: We’ve previously talked about bloggers trying to live on a food stamp budget for a week (yeah, that’s a thing). One of the many odd recurring elements of these post is a litany of complaints about life without caffeine because… I had already understood […] The post “The belief was so strong that it trumped the evidence before them.”…

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The Next National Library of Medicine Director Can Help Define the Future of Data Science

August 24, 2015
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The main motivation for starting this blog was to share our enthusiasm about the increased importance of data and data analysis in science, industry, and society in general. Based on recent initiatives, such as BD2k, it is clear that the NIH is also enthusiastic and very much interested in supporting data science. For those that don't know,

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On deck this week

August 24, 2015
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Mon: “The belief was so strong that it trumped the evidence before them.” Tues: “Can you change your Bayesian prior?” Wed: How to analyze hierarchical survey data with post-stratification? Thurs: A political sociological course on statistics for high school students Fri: Questions about data transplanted in kidney study Sat: Performing design calculations (type M and […] The post On deck this week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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The Superiority of Economists

August 24, 2015
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The title of this post is the title of a newish paper by Marion Fourcade (Berkeley), Etienne Ollion (Strasbourg), and Yann Algan (Sciences Po, Paris) (FOA). Yes, I know FOA is already published, even insightfully...

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Video: Ten tips for simulating data with SAS

August 24, 2015
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Video: Ten tips for simulating data with SAS

One of my presentations at SAS Global Forum 2015 was titled "Ten Tips for Simulating Data with SAS". The paper was published in the conference proceedings several months ago, but I recently recorded a short video that gives an overview of the 10 tips: If your browser does not support […] The post Video: Ten tips for simulating data with SAS appeared first on The DO Loop.

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Ten tips for simulating data with SAS

August 24, 2015
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Ten tips for simulating data with SAS

One of my presentations at SAS Global Forum 2015 was titled "Ten Tips for Simulating Data with SAS". The paper was published in the conference proceedings several months ago, but I recently recorded a short video that gives an overview of the 10 tips: If your browser does not support […] The post Ten tips for simulating data with SAS appeared first on The DO Loop.

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Canberra Data Miners: Seminar on Text, Knowledge and Information Extraction, by Dr Lizhen Qu (NICTA), Canberra, 4:30-5:30pm, Tuesday 1 Sept

August 24, 2015
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Canberra Data Miners: Seminar on Text, Knowledge and Information Extraction, by Dr Lizhen Qu (NICTA), Canberra, 4:30-5:30pm, Tuesday 1 Sept

Topic: Text, Knowledge, and Information Extraction Speaker: Dr. Lizhen Qu, Researcher at NICTA Organizer: Canberra Data miners Meetup Group Date and time: 4:30-5:30pm, Tuesday 1 Sept Location: Teal Room of Inspire Centre, University of Canberra, Building 25, University of Canberra, … Continue reading →

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Predicting Titanic deaths on Kaggle IV: random forest revisited

August 23, 2015
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Predicting Titanic deaths on Kaggle IV: random forest revisited

On July 19th I used randomForest to predict the deaths on Titanic in the Kaggle competition. Subsequently I found that both bagging and boosting gave better predictions than randomForest. This I found somewhat unsatisfactory, hence I am now revisi...

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We provide a service

August 23, 2015
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A friend writes: I got the attached solicitation [see below], and Google found me your blog post on the topic. Thank you for quickly explaining what’s going on here! As far as I can see, they’ve removed the mention of payment from this first contact message – so they’re learning! But also they have enough […] The post We provide a service appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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Plaig! (non-Wegman edition)

August 22, 2015
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Mark Vallen writes (link from here): What initially disturbed me about the art of Shepard Fairey is that it displays none of the line, modeling and other idiosyncrasies that reveal an artist’s unique personal style. His imagery appears as though it’s xeroxed or run through some computer graphics program; that is to say, it is […] The post Plaig! (non-Wegman edition) appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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Data frames and tables in Scala

August 21, 2015
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Data frames and tables in Scala

Introduction To statisticians and data scientists used to working in R, the concept of a data frame is one of the most natural and basic starting points for statistical computing and data analysis. It always surprises me that data frames aren’t a core concept in most programming languages’ standard libraries, since they are essentially a … Continue reading Data frames and tables in Scala

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Data frames and tables in Scala

August 21, 2015
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Data frames and tables in Scala

Introduction To statisticians and data scientists used to working in R, the concept of a data frame is one of the most natural and basic starting points for statistical computing and data analysis. It always surprises me that data frames aren’t a core concept in most programming languages’ standard libraries, since they are essentially a … Continue reading Data frames and tables in Scala

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That was easy

August 21, 2015
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This came in the email from Tom Kertscher: Are you available this afternoon or Wednesday to talk about a fact-check article I’m doing on Gov. Scott Walker’s statement that Wisconsin is a “blue” state? I’m aware, of course, that Wisconsin has voted for the Democratic presidential nominee in each election since 1988. But I’d like […] The post That was easy appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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Interview with Sherri Rose and Laura Hatfield

August 21, 2015
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Interview with Sherri Rose and Laura Hatfield

  Rose/Hatfield © Savannah Bergquist Laura Hatfield and Sherri Rose are Assistant Professors specializing in biostatistics at Harvard Medical School in the Department of Health Care Policy. Laura received her PhD in Biostatistics from the University of Minnesota and Sherri completed her PhD in Biostatistics at UC Berkeley. They are developing novel statistical methods for

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Assistant Professor of Statistics at IUPUI

August 21, 2015
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Assistant Professor of Statistics at IUPUI

I graduated from MSU this summer and moved to Indianapolis as an assistant professor of Statistics at IUPUI. This is my first official job in life. Welcome to my Homepage: math.iupui.edu/~hlwang !

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Assistant Professor of Statistics at IUPUI

August 21, 2015
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Assistant Professor of Statistics at IUPUI

I graduated from MSU this summer and moved to Indianapolis as an assistant professor of Statistics at IUPUI. This is my first official job in life. Welcome to my Homepage: math.iupui.edu/~hlwang !

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Aahhhhh, young people!

August 21, 2015
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Amusingly statistically illiterate headline from Slate: “Apple Notices That Basically Half the Population Menstruates.” Ummmm, let’s do a quick calculation: 50 – 12 = 38. If you assume the average woman lives to be 80, then the proportion of the population who is menstruating is approximately .52*38/80 = .247. 25% is hardly “basically half”! But […] The post Aahhhhh, young people! appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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She wants to be an airborne ranger

August 21, 2015
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She wants to be an airborne ranger

I wanna be an airborne ranger, Live the life of guts and danger.* If you are an 80's movie buff, you might remember the scene in The Breakfast Club where Bender, the juvenile delinquent played by Judd Nelson, distracts the principal by running through the school singing this song. Recently, […] The post She wants to be an airborne ranger appeared first on The DO Loop.

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How to avoid making mountains out of molehills, using power/severity

August 21, 2015
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How to avoid making mountains out of molehills, using power/severity

A classic fallacy of rejection is taking a statistically significant result as evidence of a discrepancy from a test (or null) hypothesis larger than is warranted. Standard tests do have resources to combat this fallacy, but you won’t see them in textbook formulations. It’s not new statistical method, but new (and correct) interpretations of existing methods, that are needed. One […]

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