First, second, and third order bias corrections (also, my ugly R code for the mortality-rate graphs!)

November 18, 2015
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First, second, and third order bias corrections (also, my ugly R code for the mortality-rate graphs!)

As an applied statistician, I don’t do a lot of heavy math. I did prove a true theorem once (with the help of some collaborators), but that was nearly twenty years ago. Most of the time I walk along pretty familiar paths, just hoping that other people will do the mathematical work necessary for me […] The post First, second, and third order bias corrections (also, my ugly R code…

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Pareto smoothed importance sampling and infinite variance (2nd ed)

November 18, 2015
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Pareto smoothed importance sampling and infinite variance (2nd ed)

This post is by Aki Last week Xi’an blogged about an arXiv paper by Chatterjee and Diaconis which considers the proper sample size in an importance sampling setting with infinite variance. I commented Xi’an’s posting and the end result was my guest blog posting in Xi’an’s og. I made an additional figure below to summarise […] The post Pareto smoothed importance sampling and infinite variance (2nd ed) appeared first on…

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Create a map with PROC SGPLOT

November 18, 2015
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Create a map with PROC SGPLOT

Did you know that you can use the POLYGON statement in PROC SGPLOT to draw a map? The graph at the left shows the 48 contiguous states of the US, overlaid with markers that indicate the locations of major cities. The plot was created by using the POLYGON statement, which […] The post Create a map with PROC SGPLOT appeared first on The DO Loop.

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Link: The NIPS Experiment

November 18, 2015
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Link: The NIPS Experiment

The conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS) has conducted a fascinating experiment: split the program committee into two and get 10% of submissions reviewed by both. The article I’m linking to above has a great analysis of what they found (and it’s not encouraging). This would be a great experiment to run at VIS. Anybody who has spent any … Continue reading Link: The NIPS Experiment

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Potato Chips and ANOVA, Part 2: Using Analysis of Variance to Improve Sample Preparation in Analytical Chemistry

Potato Chips and ANOVA, Part 2: Using Analysis of Variance to Improve Sample Preparation in Analytical Chemistry

In this second article of a 2-part series on the official JMP blog, I use analysis of variance (ANOVA) to assess a sample-preparation scheme for quantifying sodium in potato chips.  I illustrate the use of the “Fit Y by X” platform in JMP to implement ANOVA, and I propose an alternative sample-preparation scheme to obtain […]

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Given the history of medicine, why are randomized trials not used for social policy?

November 17, 2015
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Policy changes can have substantial societal effects. For example, clean water and  hygiene policies have saved millions, if not billions, of lives. But effects are not always positive. For example, prohibition, or the "noble experiment", boosted organized crime, slowed economic growth and increased deaths caused by tainted liquor. Good intentions do not guarantee desirable outcomes. The medical establishment is well

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Internet use and religion, part two

November 17, 2015
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Internet use and religion, part two

In the previous article, I posted a preliminary exploration of the relationship between Internet use and religious affiliation in Europe.  In this article I clean up some data issues and present results broken by country.Cleaning and resamplingHer...

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Internet use and religion, part two

November 17, 2015
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Internet use and religion, part two

In the previous article, I posted a preliminary exploration of the relationship between Internet use and religious affiliation in Europe.  In this article I clean up some data issues and present results broken by country.Cleaning and resamplingHer...

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“David Brooks And Jeremy Paxman To Judge The Golden Giraffes”

November 17, 2015
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“David Brooks And Jeremy Paxman To Judge The Golden Giraffes”

I don’t think I have much of a chance here, not because of the judging—I’d trust Brooks and Paxman to recognize good writing—but because the competition includes some heavy hitters, including Dan Davies with a meta-blog-post called The Verjus Manifesto, Sara Paretsky on The Detective As Speech, and Charles Pierce with . . . well, […] The post “David Brooks And Jeremy Paxman To Judge The Golden Giraffes” appeared first…

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Just Filling in the Bubbles

November 17, 2015
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Just Filling in the Bubbles

Collin Hitt writes: I study wrong answers, per your blog post today. My research focuses mostly on surveys of schoolchildren. I study the kids who appear to be just filling in the bubbles, who by accident actually reveal something of use for education researchers. Here’s his most recent paper, “Just Filling in the Bubbles: Using […] The post Just Filling in the Bubbles appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Climatology and Predictive Modeling

November 17, 2015
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A notice about this paper just arrived. Climate Engineering EconomicsGarth Heutel, Juan Moreno-Cruz, Katharine RickeNBER Working Paper No. 21711Issued in November 2015NBER Program(s):   EEE Very cool, I thought. So I clic...

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Comments Allowed Again

November 17, 2015
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They're back on. I moderate. No live links allowed in comments.

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Paret’oothed importance sampling and infinite variance [guest post]

November 16, 2015
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Paret’oothed importance sampling and infinite variance [guest post]

[Here are some comments sent to me by Aki Vehtari in the sequel of the previous posts.] The following is mostly based on our arXived paper with Andrew Gelman and the references mentioned  there. Koopman, Shephard, and Creal (2009) proposed to make a sample based estimate of the existence of the moments using generalized Pareto […]

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HOFs, closures, partial application and currying to solve the function environment problem in Scala

November 16, 2015
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HOFs, closures, partial application and currying to solve the function environment problem in Scala

Introduction Functional programming (FP) is a programming style that emphasises the use of referentially transparent pure functions and immutable data structures. Higher order functions (HOFs) tend to be used extensively to enable a clean functional programming style. A HOF is just a function that either takes a function as an argument or returns a function. … Continue reading HOFs, closures, partial application and currying to solve the function environment problem…

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Is 8+4 less than 3? 11% of respondents say Yes!

November 16, 2015
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Shane Frederick shares some observations regarding junk survey responses: Obviously, some people respond randomly. For open ended questions, it is pretty easy to determine the fraction who do so. In some research I did with online surveys, “asdf” was the most common and “your mama” was 9th. This fraction is small (maybe 1-2%). But the […] The post Is 8+4 less than 3? 11% of respondents say Yes! appeared first…

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So you are getting crushed on the internet? The new normal for academics.

November 16, 2015
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Roger and I were just talking about all the discussion around the Case and Deaton paper on death rates for middle class people. Andrew Gelman discussed it among many others. They noticed a potential bias in the analysis and did some re-analysis. Just yesterday an economist blogger wrote a piece about academics versus blogs and

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Internet use and religious affiliation in Europe

November 16, 2015
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Internet use and religious affiliation in Europe

A few years ago I wrote a paper about Internet use and religious affiliation using data from the General Social Survey (GSS).  After controlling for things like education, income, and religious upbringing, I found that people who use the Internet ...

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Label markers in graphs by using the values of several variables

November 16, 2015
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Label markers in graphs by using the values of several variables

In many procedures, the ID statement is used to identify observations by specifying an identifying variable, such as a name or a patient ID. In many regression procedures, you can specify multiple ID variables, and all variables are copied into output data sets that contain observation-wise statistics such as predicted […] The post Label markers in graphs by using the values of several variables appeared first on The DO Loop.

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Tapestry 2016 Open For Applications

November 16, 2015
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Tapestry 2016 Open For Applications

Tapestry 2016 will take place March 9 next year in a historic hotel near Denver, CO. We have put together another exciting line-up of keynote speakers and are looking for applications from people who want to attend or speak. The goal behind Tapestry is to connect people who are interested in storytelling with data. It’s a small … Continue reading Tapestry 2016 Open For Applications

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Asking the question is the most important step

November 16, 2015
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Asking the question is the most important step

In statistics, the glamour often comes to those who perform a challenging data analysis that extracts signal from noise, as in Aki Vehtari’s decomposition of the famous birthday data which led to the stunning graphs on the cover of BDA3. But, from a social-science point of view, the biggest credit has to go to whoever […] The post Asking the question is the most important step appeared first on Statistical…

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November Reading

November 15, 2015
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November Reading

Somewhat belatedly, here is some suggested reading for this month:Al-Sadoon, M. M., 2015. Testing subspace Granger causality. Barcelona GSE Working Paper Series, Working Paper nº 850.Droumaguet, M., A. Warne, & T. Wozniak, 2015. Granger causality ...

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Why is it so hard for them to acknowledge a correction?

November 15, 2015
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Why is it so hard for them to acknowledge a correction?

Anne Case (as quoted by Jesse Singal): We spent a year working on this paper, sweating out every number, sweating out over what we were doing, and then to see people blogging about it in real time — that’s not the way science really gets done. . . . And so it’s a little hard […] The post Why is it so hard for them to acknowledge a correction? appeared…

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“Should Prison Sentences Be Based On Crimes That Haven’t Been Committed Yet?”

November 15, 2015
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Andrea Panizza asks me what I think of this post by Anna Maria Barry-Jester, Ben Castleman, and Dana Goldstein, “Should Prison Sentences Be Based On Crimes That Haven’t Been Committed Yet?” The post begins as follows: Criminal sentencing has long been based on the present crime and, sometimes, the defendant’s past criminal record. In Pennsylvania, […] The post “Should Prison Sentences Be Based On Crimes That Haven’t Been Committed Yet?”…

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