Open Data – Stack Exchange

March 13, 2015
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Open Data – Stack Exchange

As a fan of Stack Exchange I am very excited about the new exchange being made available. This exchange is called 'Open Data' and allows users to post questions on where to find publicly available data on a topic and other users will respond with one o...

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Observing Rosling’s Current Visual Style

March 12, 2015
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Observing Rosling’s Current Visual Style

On the sister blog, I wrote about Hans Rosling’s recent presentation in New York (link). I noted that Rosling has apparently simplified his visual palette. Rosling is best known as the developer of the Gapminder tool, used to visualize global...

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Analyzing the first 10 million digits of pi: Randomness within structure

March 12, 2015
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Analyzing the first 10 million digits of pi: Randomness within structure

Saturday, March 14, 2015, is Pi Day, and this year is a super-special Pi Day! This is your once-in-a-lifetime chance to celebrate the first 10 digits of pi (π) by doing something special on 3/14/15 at 9:26:53. Apologies to my European friends, but Pi Day requires that you represent dates […] The post Analyzing the first 10 million digits of pi: Randomness within structure appeared first on The DO Loop.

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Ed Wood (3) vs. Alan Turing (2); Levi-Strauss advances

March 12, 2015
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I was going to call yesterday‘s match for Leonardo, based on Tom’s comment: I’ve been wondering how often a weak player / team gets to a final because they mostly come across weaker opposition and get a bit of luck. I think that Leonardo is the type of guy who could invent a remarkable device […] The post Ed Wood (3) vs. Alan Turing (2); Levi-Strauss advances appeared first on…

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Stock-and-flow and other concepts that are important in statistical modeling but typically don’t get taught to statisticians

March 12, 2015
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Bill Harris writes: You’ve written about causality somewhat often, and you, along with perhaps everyone who has done anything with statistics, have written that “correlation is not causation.” When you say that correlation is not causation, you seem to be pointing out cases where correlation exists but causality does not. While that’s important, there’s another […] The post Stock-and-flow and other concepts that are important in statistical modeling but typically…

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All She Wrote (so far): Error Statistics Philosophy: 3.5 years on

March 12, 2015
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All She Wrote (so far): Error Statistics Philosophy: 3.5 years on

  Error Statistics Philosophy: Blog Contents (3.5 years) By: D. G. Mayo [i] September 2011 (9/3) Frequentists in Exile: The Purpose of this Blog (9/3) Overheard at the comedy hour at the Bayesian retreat (9/4) Drilling Rule #1 (9/9) Kuru (9/13) In Exile, Clinging to Old Ideas? (9/15) SF conferences & E. Lehmann (9/16) Getting It Right But for the Wrong Reason (9/20) A Highly Anomalous Event […]

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I barely graduated college, and that’s okay

March 12, 2015
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I barely graduated college, and that’s okay

I didn’t do very well in high school. My grade point average was around a 2.5 out of 4. I did well in some subjects that I was interested in, like math, computer science, and history, but everything else was a wash. The less homework a class requi...

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Common reasons for rejection

March 12, 2015
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Common reasons for rejection

Every week I reject some papers submitted to the International Journal of Forecasting, without sending the papers off to associate editors or reviewers. Here are five of the most common reasons for rejection. 1. Wrong Journal Submissions to the IJF should be about forecasting, obviously. But we often get papers on econometrics, or time series […]

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Edmond Malinvaud (1923-2015)

March 12, 2015
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Edmond Malinvaud (1923-2015)

By now, many of you will be aware that the highly influential French economist, Edmond Malinvaud, passed away on 7 March at the age of 91.This is a huge loss for the profession.Malinvaud made many seminal contributions to microeconomics, macroeconomics...

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The Win-Vector R data science value pack

March 11, 2015
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The Win-Vector R data science value pack

Win-Vector LLC is proud to announce the R data science value pack. 50% off our video course Introduction to Data Science (available at Udemy) and 30% off Practical Data Science with R (from Manning). Pick any combination of video, e-book, and/or print-book you want. Instructions below. Please share and Tweet! For 50% off the video … Continue reading The Win-Vector R data science value pack → Related posts: How does…

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Leonardo da Vinci (1) vs. Claude Levi-Strauss; Camus advances

March 11, 2015
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I was really rooting for Kinkade in yesterday‘s contest, but you didn’t oblige me. We didn’t have much in the way of comments yesterday, but the best we had was by Zbicyclist: Kinkade seemed to advance through round 1 because it would be interesting to have him explain the contradictions between his personal life and […] The post Leonardo da Vinci (1) vs. Claude Levi-Strauss; Camus advances appeared first on…

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Transformative experiences: a discussion with L. A. Paul and Paul Bloom

March 11, 2015
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A couple years ago we had a discussion of philosopher L. A. Paul’s argument that the decision to have a child cannot be made rationally. Paul recently published her ideas as a book, “Transformative Experience,” which she recently discussed online with psychology researcher Paul Bloom. (I’ll refer to the two people involved as L.A. and […] The post Transformative experiences: a discussion with L. A. Paul and Paul Bloom appeared…

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Tricky boy William

March 11, 2015
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Tricky boy William

Last week, I was quite bothered by this chart I produced using the Baby Name Voyager tool. According to this chart, William has drastically declined in popularity over time. The name was 7 times more popular back in the 1880s...

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Matrix multiplication with missing values in SAS

March 11, 2015
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Matrix multiplication with missing values in SAS

Sometimes I get contacted by SAS/IML programmers who discover that the SAS/IML language does not provide built-in support for multiplication of matrices that have missing values. (SAS/IML does support elementwise operations with missing values.) I usually respond by asking what they are trying to accomplish, because mathematically matrix multiplication with […] The post Matrix multiplication with missing values in SAS appeared first on The DO Loop.

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Notes from the Kölner R meeting, 6 March 2015

March 10, 2015
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Notes from the Kölner R meeting, 6 March 2015

At last Friday's Cologne R user group meeting we welcomed two Northerners from the left and right (or 'right' and 'wrong') side of the Rhine.Using R in Excel via R.NETGünter Faes and Matthias SpixDownload slidesGünter and Michael presented examples o...

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“Voices from everywhere saying gently: This we praise. This we don’t.”

March 10, 2015
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One of America’s leading political columnists, David Brooks, has just come out with a column called “The Cost of Relativism” about the growing chasm between college-educated America and those who write for major newspapers. It’s got a definitive collection of data about this divide. Just kidding about the “definitive collection of data.” Anyway, to continue: […] The post “Voices from everywhere saying gently: This we praise. This we don’t.” appeared…

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Thomas Kinkade vs. Albert Camus (1); Cervantes advances

March 10, 2015
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Yesterday‘s winner is Cervantes, for the simple reason that nobody gave any good reasons to invite Thoreau. Ooooh, today’s contest is a toughie. House on fire or existential struggle? Either one would have a lot to say, but only one of them has a “TM” after his name. Give it your best shot. P.S. As […] The post Thomas Kinkade vs. Albert Camus (1); Cervantes advances appeared first on Statistical…

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The illusion of the illusion of control

March 10, 2015
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The illusion of the illusion of control

Yesterday we discussed the sad and disturbing career of psychology researcher Ellen Langer, who was was famous (to me) for her 1975 article on the illusion of control, “defined as an expectancy of a personal success probability inappropriately higher than the objective probability would warrant.” And then, in her own research, she herself became subject […] The post The illusion of the illusion of control appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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The frequentist case against the significance test, part 2

March 9, 2015
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The frequentist case against the significance test, part 2

The significance test is perhaps the most used statistical procedure in the world, though has never been without its detractors. This is the second of two posts exploring Neyman's frequentist arguments against the significance test; if you have not read Part 1, you should do so before continuing (“The frequentist case against the significance test, part 1”).Neyman offered two major arguments against the significance test:The significance test fails as an…

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Miguel de Cervantes (2) vs. Henry David Thoreau (3); Eddy advances

March 9, 2015
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Yesterday’s best argument came from Zbicyclist: I suspect the actual Mohammad would be regarded as a heretic by at least some branches is Islam. . . . I’d rather be in an audience with a bunch of radical Christian Scientists than a bunch of radical Islamists. Good point. Controversy’s ok, but I don’t think I […] The post Miguel de Cervantes (2) vs. Henry David Thoreau (3); Eddy advances appeared…

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Ellen Langer: expert on, and victim of, the illusion of control

March 9, 2015
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Ellen Langer:  expert on, and victim of, the illusion of control

It all started when Lee Sechrest pointed me to this post by James Coyne. Sechrest wrote: I know you have enough to do, and if you do not get to this…well, no problems. It is a blog by Jim Coyne taking apart a “classic” study in social psychology, originally published in the early ’70s. Implausible […] The post Ellen Langer: expert on, and victim of, the illusion of control appeared…

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The frequentist case against the significance test, part 1

March 9, 2015
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It is unfortunate that today, we tend to think about statistical theory in terms of Bayesianism vs frequentism. Modern practice is a blend of Fisher's and Neyman's ideas, with the characteristics of the blend driven by convenience rather than principle. Significance tests are lumped in as a “frequentist” technique by Bayesians in an unfortunate rhetorical shorthand.In recent years, the significance test has been critiqued on several grounds, but often these…

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Writing data in chunks: Does the chunk size matter?

March 9, 2015
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Writing data in chunks: Does the chunk size matter?

I often blog about the usefulness of vectorization in the SAS/IML language. A one-sentence summary of vectorization is "execute a small number of statements that each analyze a lot of data." In general, for matrix languages (SAS/IML, MATLAB, R, ...) vectorization is more efficient than the alternative, which is to […] The post Writing data in chunks: Does the chunk size matter? appeared first on The DO Loop.

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