Ternary plots in politics

August 4, 2015
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Ternary plots in politics

When we study elections with this geometric figure, each point of the triangle intuitively represents 3 coordinates.

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Ternary plots in politics

August 4, 2015
By
Ternary plots in politics

When we study elections with this geometric figure, each point of the triangle intuitively represents 3 coordinates, parties, or candidates. This week, I skin a post by Nicholas Hamilton about ternary plots that made me think, how this geometric d...

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Ternary plots in politics

August 4, 2015
By
Ternary plots in politics

When we study elections with this geometric figure, each point of the triangle intuitively represents 3 coordinates, parties, or candidates. This week, I skin a post by Nicholas Hamilton about ternary plots that made me think, how this geometric d...

Read more »

Ternary plots in politics

August 4, 2015
By
Ternary plots in politics

When we study elections with this geometric figure, each point of the triangle intuitively represents 3 coordinates, parties, or candidates. This week, I skin a post by Nicholas Hamilton about ternary plots that made me think, how this geometric d...

Read more »

Ternary plots in politics

August 4, 2015
By
Ternary plots in politics

When we study elections with this geometric figure, each point of the triangle intuitively represents 3 coordinates, parties, or candidates. This week, I skin a post by Nicholas Hamilton about ternary plots that made me think, how this geometric d...

Read more »

Ternary plots in politics

August 4, 2015
By
Ternary plots in politics

When we study elections with this geometric figure, each point of the triangle intuitively represents 3 coordinates, parties, or candidates. This week, I skin a post by Nicholas Hamilton about ternary plots that made me think, how this geometric d...

Read more »

Ternary plots in politics

August 4, 2015
By
Ternary plots in politics

When we study elections with this geometric figure, each point of the triangle intuitively represents 3 coordinates, parties, or candidates. This week, I skin a post by Nicholas Hamilton about ternary plots that made me think, how this geometric d...

Read more »

Ternary plots in politics

August 4, 2015
By
Ternary plots in politics

When we study elections with this geometric figure, each point of the triangle intuitively represents 3 coordinates, parties, or candidates. This week, I skin a post by Nicholas Hamilton about ternary plots that made me think, how this geometric d...

Read more »

Sensemaking in R: A Plenitude of Models Makes for Good Storytelling

August 3, 2015
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Sensemaking in R: A Plenitude of Models Makes for Good Storytelling

"Sensemaking is a motivated, continuous effort to understand connections (which can be among people, places, and events) in order to anticipate their trajectories and act effectively."- Gary Klein, Brian Moon & Robert HoffmanMaking Sense of Sensema...

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Bayesian meta-analysis provides high-precision estimate of cosmic impact event at ~12,800 years before 1950

August 3, 2015
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Bayesian meta-analysis provides high-precision estimate of cosmic impact event at ~12,800 years before 1950

A recently published article in PNAS reports a Bayesian meta-analysis of data from 354 samples from 23 geological sites on 4 continents, yielding a 95% credible interval from 12,835 to 12,735 years before 1950 for the cosmic impact event that formed th...

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I was wrong about statistics

August 3, 2015
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I was wrong about statistics

I’ll admit it: I have been wrong about statistics. However, that isn’t what this article is about. This article is less about some of the statistical mistakes I have made, as a mere working data scientist, and more of a rant about the hectoring tone of corrections from some statisticians (both when I have been … Continue reading I was wrong about statistics

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The plagiarist next door strikes back: Different standards of plagiarism in different communities

August 3, 2015
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The plagiarist next door strikes back:  Different standards of plagiarism in different communities

Commenters on this blog sometimes tell me not to waste so much time talking about plagiarism. And in the grand scheme of things, what could be more trivial than plagiarism in an obscure German book of chess anecdotes? Yet this is what I have come to talk with you about today. As usual, I will […] The post The plagiarist next door strikes back: Different standards of plagiarism in different…

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On deck this week

August 3, 2015
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Mon: The plagiarist next door strikes back: Different standards of plagiarism in different communities Tues: Pro Publica’s new Surgeon Scorecards Wed: How Hamiltonian Monte Carlo works Thurs: When does Bayes do the job? Fri: Here’s a theor...

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Where did it come from? Adding the source of each observation to a SAS data set

August 3, 2015
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Where did it come from? Adding the source of each observation to a SAS data set

Imagine the following scenario. You have many data sets from various sources, such as individual stores or hospitals. You use the SAS DATA step to concatenate the many data sets into a single large data set. You give the big data set to a colleague who will analyze it. Later […] The post Where did it come from? Adding the source of each observation to a SAS data set appeared…

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The bias-variance decomposition

August 3, 2015
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The bias-variance decomposition

This week, I am teaching my Business Analytics class about the bias-variance trade-off. For some reason, the proof is not contained in either ESL or ISL, even though it is quite simple. I also discovered that the proof currently provided on Wikipedia makes little sense in places. So I wrote my own for the class. […]

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More than just Numbers

August 3, 2015
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More than just Numbers

The historical research uses statistics since ever.  And Official Statistics are a favourite source for quantitative historiography and digital humanities. ‘Statistics are more than just numbers’ Statistics New Zealand depicts the history of the capital Wellington with a popular format – an infographic. ‘In 1865, following a period of heated debate, an independent tribunal of … Continue reading More than just Numbers

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More than just Numbers

August 3, 2015
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More than just Numbers

The historical research uses statistics since ever.  And Official Statistics are a favourite source for quantitative historiography and digital humanities. ‘Statistics are more than just numbers’ Statistics New Zealand depicts the history of the capital Wellington with a popular format – an infographic. ‘In 1865, following a period of heated debate, an independent tribunal of … Continue reading More than just Numbers

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Using and Producing a Control Chart in R for Statistical Process Control – An Application in Analytical Chemistry

Using and Producing a Control Chart in R for Statistical Process Control – An Application in Analytical Chemistry

Update on Wednesday, August 5, 2015: I am considering retracting this blog post based on my disagreement with Daniel Harris’ approach to building the warning and action lines in a control chart.  Please see my replies to Jake Yeager and Lee Kennedy in the comments section for my thoughts.  Your patience is appreciated; please stay […]

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Spam!

August 2, 2015
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The following bit of irrelevance appeared on the stan-users mailing list: On Jun 11, 2015, at 11:29 AM, Joanna Caldwell wrote: Webinar: Tips & Tricks to Improve Your Logistic Regression . . . Registration Link: . . . Abstract: Logistic regression is a commonly used tool to analyze binary classification problems. However, logistic regression still […] The post Spam! appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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Statistical/methodological prep for a career in neuroscience research?

August 2, 2015
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Shea Levy writes: I’m currently a software developer, but I’m trying to transition to the neuroscience research world. Do you have any general advice or recommended resources to prepare me to perform sound and useful experimental design and analyses? I have a very basic stats background from undergrad plus eclectic bits and pieces I’ve picked […] The post Statistical/methodological prep for a career in neuroscience research? appeared first on Statistical…

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On the Great Financial Panic of 2007

August 1, 2015
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(a) I've always felt that the "Great Financial Panic of 2007" was a good old-fashioned banking panic, even if the modern version at first looks quite different from those of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Gary Gorton's wonderful book, bu...

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If you leave your datasets sitting out on the counter, they get moldy

August 1, 2015
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I received the following in the email: I had a look at the dataset on speed dating you put online, and I found some big inconsistencies. Since a lot of people are using it, I hope this can help to fix them (or hopefully I did a mistake in interpreting the dataset). Here are the […] The post If you leave your datasets sitting out on the counter, they get…

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This sentence by Thomas Mallon would make Barry N. Malzberg spin in his grave, except that he’s still alive so it would just make him spin in his retirement

July 31, 2015
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This sentence by Thomas Mallon would make Barry N. Malzberg spin in his grave, except that he’s still alive so it would just make him spin in his retirement

Don’t get me wrong, I think Thomas Mallon is great. But what was he thinking when he wrote this: I know the New Yorker doesn’t do fact-checking anymore, but still. The funny thing is, Malzberg has similarities with Mailer both in style and subject matter. I’m guessing that in his statement Mallon is trying to […] The post This sentence by Thomas Mallon would make Barry N. Malzberg spin in…

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