Graphical forms impose assumptions on the data

April 2, 2015
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Graphical forms impose assumptions on the data

In a comment to my previous post, reader Chris P. pointed me to the following set of maps, also from the New York Times crew, on the legalization of gay marriage in the U.S. (link) (For those who did not...

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Books to Read While the Algae Grow in Your Fur, August 2014

April 2, 2015
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George Scialabba, What Are Intellectuals Good For? Essays and Reviews and The Modern Predicament When I was trying to teach myself how to be a critic (or at least how to write criticism), one of my models was this "George Scialabba" character, who ke...

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Books to Read While the Algae Grow in Your Fur, January 2015

April 2, 2015
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Attention conservation notice: I have no taste. Jin Feng and Thomas G. Kurtz, Large Deviations for Stochastic Processes \[ \newcommand{\Expect}[1]{\mathbb{E}\left[ #1 \right]} \newcommand{\Prob}[1]{\mathbb{P}\left( #1 \right)} \] Kurtz is best known for work in the 1970s and 1980s on how sequences of Markov processes converge on a limiting Markov process, especially on how they converge on a limiting deterministic dynamical system. This book is an extension of those ideas, and best…

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The Game Continues!

April 2, 2015
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The Game Continues!

I'm pleased to be able to report on the events of the second day of The Econometric Game, 2015. Thanks, once again, to Nikki for providing the information for this post.The end of Day 2 of the "Econometrics World Championships", today, saw the announce...

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April Reading

April 1, 2015
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April Reading

April 1 already - time to update your reading list. Here are some suggestions:Baek, Y. I., J. S. Cho, and P. C. B. Phillips, 2015. Testing linearity using power transforms of regressors. 2015-RWP79, Economic Research Institute, Yonsei University.Gol, A...

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Link: Dear Data

April 1, 2015
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Giorgia Lupi and Stefanie Posavec are collaborating on a clever and beautiful new project they call Dear Data (Twitter account). Every week, they are sending post cards to each other with hand-drawn visualizations of data they have gathered: public transportation, ways they communicate, etc. Giorgia and Stefanie are two of the most interesting people working in data visualization/design/art right … Continue reading Link: Dear Data

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Enough with the replication police

April 1, 2015
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Enough with the replication police

Can’t those shameless little bullies just let scientists do their research in peace? If a hypothesis test is statistically significant and a result is published in a real journal, that should be enough for any self-styled skeptic. Can you imagine what might happen if any published result could be questioned—by anybody? You’d have serious psychology […] The post Enough with the replication police appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Yet another popular nutrition headline doesn’t stand up to scrutiny

April 1, 2015
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Yet another popular nutrition headline doesn’t stand up to scrutiny

Are science journalists required to take one good statistics course? That is the question in my head when I read this Science Times article, titled "One Cup of Coffee Could Offset Three Drinks a Day" (link). We are used to seeing rather tenuous conclusions such as "Four Cups of Coffee Reduces Your Risk of X". This headline takes it up another notch. A result is claimed about the substitution effect…

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Simulate the Monty Hall Problem in SAS

April 1, 2015
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Simulate the Monty Hall Problem in SAS

The Monty Hall Problem is one of the most famous problems in elementary probability. It is famous because the correct solution is counter-intuitive and because it caused an uproar when it appeared in the "Ask Marilyn" column in Parade magazine in 1990. Discussing the problem has been known to create […]

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Are scientists really ready for ‘retraction offsets’ to advance ‘aggregate reproducibility’? (let alone ‘precautionary withdrawals’)

April 1, 2015
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Are scientists really ready for ‘retraction offsets’ to advance ‘aggregate reproducibility’? (let alone ‘precautionary withdrawals’)

Given recent evidence of the irreproducibility of a surprising number of published scientific findings, the White House’s Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) sought ideas for “leveraging its role as a significant funder of scientific research to most effectively address the problem”, and announced funding for projects to “reset the self-corrective process of scientific […]

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A new open source data set for detecting time series outliers

April 1, 2015
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A new open source data set for detecting time series outliers

Yahoo Labs has just released an interesting new data set useful for research on detecting anomalies (or outliers) in time series data. There are many contexts in which anomaly detection is important. For Yahoo, the main use case is in detecting unusual traffic on Yahoo servers. The data set comprises real traffic to Yahoo services, along […]

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Le Monde puzzle [#905]

March 31, 2015
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Le Monde puzzle [#905]

A recursive programming  Le Monde mathematical puzzle: Given n tokens with 10≤n≤25, Alice and Bob play the following game: the first player draws an integer1≤m≤6 at random. This player can then take 1≤r≤min(2m,n) tokens. The next player is then free to take 1≤s≤min(2r,n-r) tokens. The player taking the last tokens is the winner. There is […]

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Learning to teach statistics, in a MOOC

March 31, 2015
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Learning to teach statistics, in a MOOC

I am participating in a MOOC, Teaching statistics through data investigations. A MOOC is a fancy name for an online, free, correspondence course.  The letters stand for Massive Open Online Course. I decided to enrol for several reasons. First I … Continue reading →

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Learning to teach statistics, in a MOOC

March 31, 2015
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Learning to teach statistics, in a MOOC

I am participating in a MOOC, Teaching statistics through data investigations. A MOOC is a fancy name for an online, free, correspondence course.  The letters stand for Massive Open Online Course. I decided to enrol for several reasons. First I … Continue reading →

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Econometric Game 2015: Day 1

March 31, 2015
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Econometric Game 2015: Day 1

The Econometric Game, 2015, is underway!Nikki Wesslius, a member of the organizing committee, has reported to me about the opening day of The Game, saying that it was a really hectic day. Apparently, all of the participants are really enthusiastic...

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The round of 8 begins: Mark Twain (4) vs. Miguel de Cervantes (2); Carlin advances

March 31, 2015
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For yesterday‘s contest I really really really wanted to pick John Waters. For one thing, of all the 64 people in the bracket, he’s the one I think I’d like to hear the most. For another, he’s still alive and just might conceivably be amused enough by this whole contest to come up from Baltimore […] The post The round of 8 begins: Mark Twain (4) vs. Miguel de Cervantes…

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House of stats

March 31, 2015
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House of stats

[This is a rather long joint post with Roberto Cerina and compounds our paper in the April 2015 issue of Significance]1. Prelude (kind-of unrelated to what follows). Last week, Marta and I finished watching the last series of House of Cards, the N...

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Time-release pedagogy??

March 31, 2015
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Time-release pedagogy??

Mark Palko points to this report and writes: Putting aside my concerns with the “additional years of learning” metric (and I have a lot of them), I have the feeling that there’s something strange here or i’m missing something obvious. That jump from 3-year impact to 4-year seems excessive. The press release links to a […] The post Time-release pedagogy?? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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To map or not to map

March 31, 2015
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To map or not to map

The New York Times shows the following set of maps to illustrate State policies relating to illegal immigrants. (link to article) This is a great classroom exercise. The question is: to map or not to map. What are other possible...

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Bayes factors vs p-values

March 31, 2015
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Bayes factors vs p-values

Bayesian analysis and Frequentist analysis often lead to the same conclusions by different routes. But sometimes the two forms of analysis lead to starkly different conclusions. The following illustration of this difference comes from a talk by Luis Pericci last week. He attributes the example to “Bernardo (2010)” though I have not been able to find the exact […]

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Interactive pivot tables with R

March 31, 2015
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Interactive pivot tables with R

I love interactive pivot tables. That is the number one reason why I keep using spreadsheet software. The ability to look at data quickly in lots of different ways, without a single line of code helps me to get an understanding of the data really fast...

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MCMskv, Lenzerheide, Jan. 5-7, 2016

March 30, 2015
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MCMskv, Lenzerheide, Jan. 5-7, 2016

Following the highly successful [authorised opinion!, from objective sources] MCMski IV, in Chamonix last year, the BayesComp section of ISBA has decided in favour of a two-year period, which means the great item of news that next year we will meet again for MCMski V [or MCMskv for short], this time on the snowy slopes […]

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Fastest Growing Software for Scholarly Analytics: Python, R, KNIME…

March 30, 2015
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Fastest Growing Software for Scholarly Analytics: Python, R, KNIME…

In my ongoing quest to “analyze the world of analytics”, I’ve added the following section below to The Popularity of Data Analysis Software: It would be useful to have growth trend graphs for each of the analytics packages I track, … Continue reading →

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