Category: Stan

Several post-doc positions in probabilistic programming etc. in Finland

There are several open post-doc positions in Aalto and University of Helsinki in 1. probabilistic programming, 2. simulator-based inference, 3. data-efficient deep learning, 4. privacy preserving and secure methods, 5. interactive AI. All these research programs are connected and collaborating. I (Aki) am the coordinator for the project 1 and contributor in the others. Overall […]

Postdoctoral position in Vancouver! Using Stan! Working on wine! For reals.

Lizzie Wolkovich writes that she is hiring someone to help build Stan models for winegrapes. Here’s the ad: Postdoctoral Fellow in Winegrape Research—University of British Columbia The Temporal Ecology Lab is looking for a bright, motivated and collaborative researcher to join the lab and develop new winegrape models using Stan (mc-stan.org). The project combines decades […]

Claims about excess road deaths on “4/20” don’t add up

Sam Harper writes: Since you’ve written about similar papers (that recent NRA study in NEJM, the birthday analysis) before and we linked to a few of your posts, I thought you might be interested in this recent blog post we wrote about a similar kind of study claiming that fatal motor vehicle crashes increase by 12% after 4:20pm […]

State-space models in Stan

Michael Ziedalski writes: For the past few months I have been delving into Bayesian statistics and have (without hyperbole) finally found statistics intuitive and exciting. Recently I have gone into Bayesian time series methods; however, I have found no libraries to use that can implement those models. Happily, I found Stan because it seemed among […]

Active learning and decision making with varying treatment effects!

In a new paper, Iiris Sundin, Peter Schulam, Eero Siivola, Aki Vehtari, Suchi Saria, and Samuel Kaski write: Machine learning can help personalized decision support by learning models to predict individual treatment effects (ITE). This work studies the reliability of prediction-based decision-making in a task of deciding which action a to take for a target […]

StanCon 2019: 20–23 August, Cambridge, UK

It’s official. This year’s StanCon is in Cambridge. For details, see StanCon 2019 Home Page What can you expect? There will be two days of tutorials at all levels and two days of invited and submitted talks. The previous three StanCons (NYC 2017, Asilomar 2018, Helsinki 2018) were wonderful experiences for both their content and […]

Some Stan and Bayes short courses!

Robert Grant writes: I have a couple of events coming up that people might be interested in. They are all at bayescamp.com/courses Stan Taster Webinar is on 15 May, runs for one hour and is only £15. I’ll demo Stan through R (and maybe PyStan and CmdStan if the interest is there on the day), […]

Mister P for surveys in epidemiology — using Stan!

Jon Zelner points us to this new article in the American Journal of Epidemiology, “Multilevel Regression and Poststratification: A Modelling Approach to Estimating Population Quantities From Highly Selected Survey Samples,” by Marnie Downes, Lyle Gurrin, Dallas English, Jane Pirkis, Dianne Currier, Matthew Spittal, and John Carlin, which begins: Large-scale population health studies face increasing difficulties […]

stanc3: rewriting the Stan compiler

I’d like to introduce the stanc3 project, a complete rewrite of the Stan 2 compiler in OCaml. Join us! With this rewrite and migration to OCaml, there’s a great opportunity to join us on the ground floor of a new era. Your enthusiasm for or expertise in programming language theory and compiler development can help […]

revised empirical HMC

Following the informed and helpful comments from Matt Graham and Bob Carpenter on our eHMC paper [arXival] last month, we produced a revised and re-arXived version of the paper based on new experiments ran by Changye Wu and Julien Stoehr. Here are some quick replies to these comments, reproduced for convenience. (Warning: this is a […]

revised empirical HMC

Following the informed and helpful comments from Matt Graham and Bob Carpenter on our eHMC paper [arXival] last month, we produced a revised and re-arXived version of the paper based on new experiments ran by Changye Wu and Julien Stoehr. Here are some quick replies to these comments, reproduced for convenience. (Warning: this is a […]

HMC step size: How does it scale with dimension?

A bunch of us were arguing about how the Hamiltonian Monte Carlo step size should scale with dimension, and so Bob did the Bob thing and just ran an experiment on the computer to figure it out. Bob writes: This is for standard normal independent in all dimensions. Note the log scale on the x […]

call for sessions and labs at Bay2sC0mp²⁰

A call to all potential participants to the incoming BayesComp 2020 conference at the University of Florida in Gainesville, Florida, 7-10 January 2020, to submit proposals [to me] for contributed sessions on everything computational or training labs [to David Rossell] on a specific language or software. The deadline is April 1 and the sessions will […]

The Stan Core Roadmap

Here’s the plan for Stan core development that Bob presented at Stancon last week (that is, back at the end of August, 2018): Part I. Rear-View Mirror Stan 2.18 Released Multi-core Processing has Landed! Multi-Process Parallelism Map Function New Built-in Functions Manuals to HTML Improved Effective Sample Size Foreach Loops Data-qualified Arguments Bug Fixes and […]

Stan This Month

So much is going on with Stan that it can be hard to keep track, so we (the Stan project) are starting a monthly update and newsletter.  If you want to be included in the monthly mailing list, just type in your email here. Charles Margossian is the editor of Stan This Month and indeed […]

Computational Bayesian Statistics [book review]

This Cambridge University Press book by M. Antónia Amaral Turkman, Carlos Daniel Paulino, and Peter Müller is an enlarged translation of a set of lecture notes in Portuguese. (Warning: I have known Peter Müller from his PhD years in Purdue University and cannot pretend to perfect objectivity. For one thing, Peter once brought me frozen-solid […]