Tag: Error Statistics

Neyman: Distinguishing tests of statistical hypotheses and tests of significance might have been a lapse of someone’s pen

I’ll continue to post Neyman-related items this week in honor of his birthday. This isn’t the only paper in which Neyman makes it clear he denies a distinction between a test of  statistical hypotheses and significance tests. He and E. Pearson also discredit the myth that the former is only allowed to report pre-data, fixed error probabilities, and are […]

Neyman vs the ‘Inferential’ Probabilists

We celebrated Jerzy Neyman’s Birthday (April 16, 1894) last night in our seminar: here’s a pic of the cake.  My entry today is a brief excerpt and a link to a paper of his that we haven’t discussed much on this blog: Neyman, J. (1962), ‘Two Breakthroughs in the Theory of Statistical Decision Making‘ [i] […]

Little Bit of Logic (5 mini problems for the reader)

Little bit of logic (5 little problems for you)[i] Deductively valid arguments can readily have false conclusions! Yes, deductively valid arguments allow drawing their conclusions with 100% reliability but only if all their premises are true. For an argument to be deductively valid means simply that if the premises of the argument are all true, […]

You Should Be Binge Reading the (Strong) Likelihood Principle

  An essential component of inference based on familiar frequentist notions p-values, significance and confidence levels, is the relevant sampling distribution (hence the term sampling theory, or my preferred error statistics, as we get error probabilities from the sampling distribution). This feature results in violations of a principle known as the strong likelihood principle (SLP). […]

Stephen Senn: Rothamsted Statistics meets Lord’s Paradox (Guest Post)

Stephen Senn Consultant Statistician Edinburgh The Rothamsted School I never worked at Rothamsted but during the eight years I was at University College London (1995-2003) I frequently shared a train journey to London from Harpenden (the village in which Rothamsted is situated) with John Nelder, as a result of which we became friends and I […]

severe testing or severe sabotage? Christian Roberts and the book slasher.

severe testing or severe sabotage? [not a book review]   I came across this anomaly on Christian Roberts’s blog.  Last week, I received this new book of Deborah Mayo, which I was looking forward reading and annotating!, but thrice alas, the book had been sabotaged: except for the preface and acknowledgements, the entire book is printed upside down [a […]

RSS 2018 – Significance Tests: Rethinking the Controversy

Day 2, Wednesday 05/09/2018 11:20 – 13:20 Keynote 4 – Significance Tests: Rethinking the Controversy Assembly Room Speakers: Sir David Cox, Nuffield College, Oxford Deborah Mayo, Virginia Tech Richard Morey, Cardiff University Aris Spanos, Virginia Tech Intermingled in today’s statistical controversies are some long-standing, but unresolved, disagreements on the nature and principles of statistical methods […]

Neyman vs the ‘Inferential’ Probabilists continued (a)

Today is Jerzy Neyman’s Birthday (April 16, 1894 – August 5, 1981).  I am posting a brief excerpt and a link to a paper of his that I hadn’t posted before: Neyman, J. (1962), ‘Two Breakthroughs in the Theory of Statistical Decision Making‘ [i] It’s chock full of ideas and arguments, but the one that interests […]