Example 9.38: dynamite plots, revisited

July 16, 2012
By
Example 9.38: dynamite plots, revisited

Dynamite plots are a somewhat pejorative term for a graphical display where the height of a bar indicates the mean, and the vertical line on top of it represents the standard deviation (or standard error). These displays are commonly found in many scie...

Read more »

Long discussion about causal inference and the use of hierarchical models to bridge between different inferential settings

July 16, 2012
By

Elias Bareinboim asked what I thought about his comment on selection bias in which he referred to a paper by himself and Judea Pearl, “Controlling Selection Bias in Causal Inference.” I replied that I have no problem with what he wrote, but that from my perspective I find it easier to conceptualize such problems in [...]

Read more »

Best Books for Social Scientists on Bayesian Analysis

July 16, 2012
By
Best Books for Social Scientists on Bayesian Analysis

I list and discuss the three books on Bayesian analysis that I recommend to social scientists. I encourage you to share this with others and contribute to the conversation at Best Books for Social Scientists on Bayesian Analysis, which first appeared at carlislerainey.com.For more of my thoughts and ideas, subscribe to my blog (via RSS or Email) and follow me on Twitter. You also might like to browse my archive and…

Read more »

Indexing a SAS data set to improve processing categories in SAS/IML

July 16, 2012
By
Indexing a SAS data set to improve processing categories in SAS/IML

I have blogged about three different SAS/IML techniques that iterate over categories and process the observations in each category. The three techniques are as follows: Use a WHERE clause on the READ statement to read only the observations in the ith category. This is described in the article "BY-group processing [...]

Read more »

Data Display vs. Data Visualization

July 16, 2012
By
Data Display vs. Data Visualization

Gregor Aisch recently wrote a posting about gauges, and how he finds them inspiring and beautiful in their simplicity, even though they are generally disliked in visualization. His posting highlights a common misconception about visualization, and a conflation of different uses of data display, that is worth exploring. Gregor takes issue with the notion that visualization requires a certain number of data points to be displayed. He also considers “breaking…

Read more »

Deconstructing Larry Wasserman–it starts like this…

July 16, 2012
By
Deconstructing Larry Wasserman–it starts like this…

In my July 8, 2012 post “Metablog: Up and Coming,” I wrote: “I will attempt a (daring) deconstruction of Professor Wasserman’s paper[i] and at that time will invite your “U-Phils” for posting around a week after (<1000 words).” These could reflect on Wasserman’s paper and/or my deconstruction of it. See an earlier post for the [...]

Read more »

Reading graphs can be tricky

July 16, 2012
By
Reading graphs can be tricky

For many people, a graph is not obvious. Let me illustrate: Here are two graphs showing the results from two classes of students in some mythical test out of 10. Have a look at them and decide which one shows … Continue reading →

Read more »

Q-A Section 11–GWAS, Linkage Analysis

July 15, 2012
By
Q-A Section 11–GWAS, Linkage Analysis

eQTL tries to regress each gene expression against each SNP, in order to find those regulatory elements. And eQTL uses “normal” samples, right? (by normal I mean “no disease” like those in 1000genome project) GWAS compares SNPs between normal(control) and disease(test) samples, trying to find out those higher-frequency variants enriched for diseases. linkage mapping/recombination mapping/positional [...]

Read more »

Useful for referring–7-15-2012

July 15, 2012
By
Useful for referring–7-15-2012

Simplicity is hard to sell Self-Repairing Bayesian Inference Praxis and Ideology in Bayesian Data Analysis In-consistent Bayesian inference Big Data Generalized Linear Models with Revolution R Enterprise Quants, Models, and the Blame Game Fun with the googleVis Package for R Topological Data Analysis The Winners of the LaTeX and Graphics Contest  Is Machine Learning Losing Impact? Machine Learning Doesn’t [...]

Read more »

Sunday Data/Statistics Link Roundup (7/15/12)

July 15, 2012
By

A really nice list of journals software/data release policies from Titus’ blog. Interesting that he couldn’t find a data/release policy for the New England Journal of Medicine. I wonder if that is because it publishes mostly clinical studie...

Read more »

Open Government Data Benchmark: FR, UK, USA

July 15, 2012
By
Open Government Data Benchmark: FR, UK, USA

Finally there’s a very interesting comparison of OGD in three leading countries. qunb did it . Have a look at this presentation. 1) There are lots of duplicates on OGD platforms . 2) There are very few structured data yet . . 3) Apps are the real challenge There are different strategies fostering the developmemt …Read More

Read more »

Some decision analysis problems are pretty easy, no?

July 15, 2012
By

Cassie Murdoch reports: A 47-year-old woman in Uxbridge, Massachusetts, got behind the wheel of her car after having a bit too much to drink, but instead of wreaking havoc on the road, she ended up lodged in a sand trap at a local golf course. Why? Because her GPS made her do it—obviously! She said [...]

Read more »

The 1000 Genomes Project Community Meeting 2012

July 15, 2012
By
The 1000 Genomes Project Community Meeting 2012

I attended the The 1000 Genomes Project Community Meeting 12th and 13th July 2012 at University of Michigan. Because lots of the presentations are more from the computation point of view instead of statistical point of view, I have little idea about those talks. But from my point of view, if you want me to [...]

Read more »

Bits: Betaworks Buys What’s Left of Social News Site Digg

July 15, 2012
By

Bits: Betaworks Buys What's Left of Social News Site Digg: Betaworks, a technology incubator in New York, has purchased Digg, a social news site that has slowly lost steam amid the rise of services like Twitter and Facebook. It’s a bit sad to see Di...

Read more »

Sourcing an R Script from Dropbox

July 15, 2012
By

Working on my R bootcamp materials and I thought it would be handy to get the bootcamp computers setup by sourcing an R script that will install all necessary non-core packages in it. The problem? How to deploy this script efficiently. A quick method w...

Read more »

Modern Two-Sample Tests

July 14, 2012
By
Modern Two-Sample Tests

When you are a student, one of the first problems you learn about is the two-sample test. So you might think that this problem is old news. But it has had a revival: there is a lot of recent research activity on this seemingly simple problem. What makes the problem still interesting and challenging is [...]

Read more »

Linear programming in R: an lpSolveAPI example

July 14, 2012
By
Linear programming in R: an lpSolveAPI example

First of all, a shout out to R-bloggers for adding my feed to their website! Linear programming is a valuable instrument when it comes to decision making. This post shows how R in conjunction with the lpSolveAPI package, can be used to build a linear programming model and to analyse  Read more »The post Linear programming in R: an lpSolveAPI example appeared first on FishyOperations.

Read more »

Bits: Mobile App Developers Scoop Up Vast Amounts of Data, Reports Say

July 14, 2012
By

Bits: Mobile App Developers Scoop Up Vast Amounts of Data, Reports Say: As mobile apps proliferate, new details are emerging about how much data mobile advertising networks inhale and how uninformed their users might be about this. Two new reports thi...

Read more »

Ripping off a ripoff

July 14, 2012
By

I opened the newspaper today (recall that this blog is on an approximately one-month delay) to see a moderately horrifying story about art appraisers who are deterred by fear of lawsuits from expressing an opinion about possible forgeries. Maybe this trend will come to science too? Perhaps Brett Pelham will sue Uri Simonsohn for the [...]

Read more »

Computing log gamma differences

July 14, 2012
By

Statistical computing often involves working with ratios of factorials. These factorials are often too big to fit in a floating point number, and so we work with logarithms. So if we need to compute log(a! / b!), we call software…Read more ›

Read more »

Dynamical systems: Mapping chaos with R

July 13, 2012
By
Dynamical systems: Mapping chaos with R

Chaos. Hectic, seemingly unpredictable, complex dynamics. In a word: fun. I usually stick to the warm and fuzzy world of stochasticity and probability distributions, but this post will be (almost) entirely devoid of randomness. While chaotic dynamics are entirely deterministic, their sensitivity to initial conditions can trick the observer into seeing iid. In ecology, chaotic

Read more »

This is not about statistics, but it’s about Emacs, which…

July 13, 2012
By

This is not about statistics, but it’s about Emacs, which I’ve been using for a long time. This guy is an Emacs virtuoso, and the crazy thing is that he’s only been using it for 8 months! Best line: “Should I wait for the next version of Emacs?...

Read more »


Subscribe

Email:

  Subscribe