Big Data or Pig Data?

March 4, 2013
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Big Data or Pig Data?

I don’t know if my reading of this Orwellian* piece is in sync with what Rameez intended, but he thought it was fine for me to post it here. See what you think:  “Big Data or Pig Data” (A fable on huge amounts of data and why we don’t need models) by Remeez Rahman, computer scientist: posted […]

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Big Data – Context = Bad

March 4, 2013
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There’s a nice article by Nick Bilton in the New York Times Bits blog about the need for context when looking at Big Data. Actually, the article starts off by describing how Google’s Flu Trends model overestimated the number of … Continue reading →

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PyStan!

March 4, 2013
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Stan is written in C++ and can be run from the command line and from R. We’d like for Python users to be able to run Stan as well. If anyone is interested in doing this, please let us know and we’d be happy to work with you on it. Stan, like Python, is completely [...]

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Shiny with PerformanceAnalytics Example

March 4, 2013
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Shiny with PerformanceAnalytics Example

The folks at Rstudio have done some amazing work with the shiny package. From the shiny homepage, “Shiny makes it super simple for R users like you to turn analyses into interactive web applications that anyone can use.” Developing web applications has always appealed to me, but hosting, learning javascript, html, etc. made me put … Continue reading →

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IMLPlus documentation is now available online

March 4, 2013
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IMLPlus documentation is now available online

I am pleased to announce that the documentation for the IMLPlus language is now available online. Previously, this resource was available only from within the SAS/IML Studio application. This documentation can now be accessed by anyone, regardless of whether they have installed SAS/IML Studio. As I have described previously, IMLPlus [...]

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The ISOTYPE

March 4, 2013
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The ISOTYPE

Communicating data visually is not only about perception and precision, but also understanding. ISOTYPE was developed to bridge the gap between showing data in a way that’s easy to read and at the same time easier to understand than unadorned bar charts. The International System of Typographic Picture Education (which is what ISOTYPE stands for) was developed in the 1920s by Otto Neurath, his wife Marie Neurath, and Gerd Arntz.…

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Shibboleth, Mixolydian, Heteroscedasticity – and Kipling

March 4, 2013
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Shibboleth, Mixolydian, Heteroscedasticity – and Kipling

All areas of human endeavour have specific language. Cricket commentators, art critics and wines buff make this very obvious. Mixolydian My son, who is blind, autistic and plays the piano like an angel, is studying Jazz, and I’m helping him. … Continue reading →

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Tips and Tricks for HTML and R

March 4, 2013
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Over the past two months I have tried to convert completely to HTML5 slides, HTML reports and R + knitr. The switch from Sweave came with a few frustrations but I think overall it is way better - it is incredibly efficient and while some flexibility on...

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Revisiting Grouponomics

March 3, 2013
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Two items of news came out this week regarding Groupon, the daily-deals company. I first wrote about them here in response to Felix Salmon's thoughtful piece. Restaurants in Westchester are unhappy about Groupon-type deals "sucking $280 million from independent restaurants". (link) Wasn't it not long ago that we were supposed to believe that Groupon is "free advertising" for restaurant owners, and brings a lot of new customers to fill the…

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Think about statistical inferences from the ground up again

March 3, 2013
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Think about statistical inferences from the ground up again

The evidence in large medical data sets is direct, but indirect as well – and there is just too much of the indirect evidence to ignore. If you want to prove that your drug of choice is good or bad your evidence is not just how it does, it is also how all the other drugs […]

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More research on the role of puzzles in processing data graphics

March 3, 2013
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Ruth Rosenholtz of the department of Brain and Cognitive Science at MIT writes: We mostly do computational modeling of human vision. We try to do on the one hand the sort of basic science that fits in the human vision community, while on the other hand developing predictive models which might actually lend insight into [...]

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Sunday data/statistics link roundup (3/3/2013)

March 3, 2013
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A really nice example where epidemiological studies are later confirmed by a randomized trial. From a statistician’s point of view, this is the idealized way that science would work. First, data that are relatively cheap (observational/retrospective studies) are used to … Continue reading →

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Occurrence of Alzheimer deaths in Netherlands

March 3, 2013
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Occurrence of Alzheimer deaths in Netherlands

I wanted to know a bit more about the number of people suffering from Alzheimer. It has been getting more attention and it runs in my family. From CBS (Statistics Netherlands) I pulled the data regarding the number of people dying from it. I am af...

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Classification error

March 2, 2013
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15-2040 != 19-3010 (and, for that matter, 25-1022 != 25-1063).

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Distribution of T-Scores

March 2, 2013
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Distribution of T-Scores

Like most of my post these code snippets derive from various other projects.  In this example it shows a simulation of how one can determine if a set of t statistics are distributed properly.  This can be useful when sampling known populations (e.g. U.S. census or hospital populations) or populations that will soon be known [...]

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Distribution of T-Scores

March 2, 2013
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Like most of my post these code snippets derive from various other projects.  In this example it shows a simulation of how one can determine if a set of t statistics are distributed properly.  This can be useful when sampling known populations (e.g. U.S. census or hospital populations) or populations that will soon be known [...]

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Fishing for cherries

March 2, 2013
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Someone writes: I’m currently trying to make sense of the Army’s preliminary figures on their Comprehensive Soldier Fitness programme, which I found here. That report (see for example table 4 on p.15) has only a few very small “effec...

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Adding Labels to Points in a Scatter Plot in R

March 2, 2013
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Adding Labels to Points in a Scatter Plot in R

What’s the Scatter? A scatter plot displays the values of 2 variables for a set of data, and it is a very useful way to visualize data during exploratory data analysis, especially (though not exclusively) when you are interested in the relationship between a predictor variable and a target variable.  Sometimes, such data come with categorical […]

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The options mechanism in R

March 2, 2013
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Customization in R. Basics Several features benefit from being customizable — either because of personal taste or specifics of the environment. The way R implements this flexibility is through the options function.  This both sets and reports options.  For example, we can see the names of the options that are set by default: > names(options()) […]The post The options mechanism in R appeared first on Burns Statistics.

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making a random walk geometrically ergodic

March 1, 2013
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making a random walk geometrically ergodic

While a random walk Metropolis-Hastings algorithm cannot be uniformly ergodic in a general setting (Mengersen and Tweedie, AoS, 1996), because it needs more energy to leave far away starting points, it can be geometrically ergodic depending on the target (and the proposal). In a recent Annals of Statistics paper, Leif Johnson and Charlie Geyer designed [...]

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Tools for making a paper

March 1, 2013
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Since it seems to be the fashion, here’s a post about how I make my academic papers. Actually, who am I trying to kid? This is also about how I make slides, letters, memos and “Back in 10 minutes” signs to pin on the door. Nevertheless it’s for making academic papers that I’m going to […]

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Tools for making a paper

March 1, 2013
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Since it seems to be the fashion, here’s a post about how I make my academic papers. Actually, who am I trying to kid? This is also about how I make slides, letters, memos and “Back in 10 minutes” signs to pin on the door. Nevertheless it’s for making academic papers that I’m going to [...]

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capitalizing on chance

March 1, 2013
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capitalizing on chance

Hardly a day goes by where I do not come across an article on the problems for statistical inference based on fallaciously capitalizing on chance: high-powered computer searches and “big” data trolling offer rich hunting grounds out of which apparently impressive results may be “cherry-picked”: When the hypotheses are tested on the same data that […]

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