R: Canonical Correlation Analysis on Imaging

January 5, 2015
By
R: Canonical Correlation Analysis on Imaging

In imaging, we deal with multivariate data, like in array form with several spectral bands. And trying to come up with interpretation across correlations of its dimensions is very challenging, if not impossible. For example let's recall the number of s...

Read more »

R Code for Election Posterior Distribution From a Random Sample

January 5, 2015
By
R Code for Election Posterior Distribution From a Random Sample

I wrote a summary article a couple of years ago discussing some probability aspects of the 2012 Presidential general election with a particular focus on exit polling. I’ve had a few people email me asking for the code I used in some if the examples. I have used this code since before the 2008 elections so […]

Read more »

The Island of Knowledge and the Shoreline of Wonder

January 5, 2015
By
The Island of Knowledge and the Shoreline of Wonder

In his keynote at IEEE VIS in Paris two months ago, Alberto Cairo talked about journalism, visual explanations, and what makes a good news visualization. But mostly, he talked about curiosity. When I wrote my IEEE VIS report for Tuesday of that week, I knew that I could either do a shoddy job of describing … Continue reading The Island of Knowledge and the Shoreline of Wonder

Read more »

Significance Levels are Made a Whipping Boy on Climate Change Evidence: Is .05 Too Strict? (Schachtman on Oreskes)

January 4, 2015
By
Significance Levels are Made a Whipping Boy on Climate Change Evidence: Is .05 Too Strict? (Schachtman on Oreskes)

Given the daily thrashing significance tests receive because of how preposterously easy it is claimed to satisfy the .05 significance level requirement, it’s surprising[i] to hear Naomi Oreskes blaming the .05 standard as demanding too high a burden of proof for accepting climate change. “Playing Dumb on Climate Change,” N.Y. Times Sunday Rev. at 2 (Jan. 4, 2015). Is there anything […]

Read more »

Sunday data/statistics link roundup (1/4/15)

January 4, 2015
By

I am digging this visualization of your life in weeks. I might have to go so far as to actually make one for myself. I'm very excited about the new podcast TalkingMachines and what an awesome name! I wish someone would do that same thing for applied statistics (Roger?) I love that they call Ben Goldacre

Read more »

Advance notice

January 4, 2015
By
Advance notice

As a few people have already inquired (more or less formally) about the next edition of the short course on Bayesian Methods in Health Economics, I thought it would be nice to start the new year off by posting some details on that...While we're explori...

Read more »

Relaxed plagiarism standards as a way to keep the tuition dollars flowing from foreign students

January 4, 2015
By

Interesting comment thread at Basbøll’s blog regarding the difficult position of college writing instructors when confronted with blatant student plagiarism. Randall Westgren writes: I believe the easiest part of the patchwriting [plagiarism] phenomenon to understand is why writing instructors are leading the charge. Professor Howard is caught between a herd of high-value (i.e. full-tuition and […] The post Relaxed plagiarism standards as a way to keep the tuition dollars flowing…

Read more »

Capital in the Netherlands, 2006-2013

January 4, 2015
By
Capital in the Netherlands, 2006-2013

I guess most people have heard of Piketty and his book capital in the twenty-First century. I don't have that book, but the media attention has made me wonder if I could see any trends in Dutch public data. As I progressed with this post, I have conclu...

Read more »

No headache power (for Deirdre)

January 3, 2015
By
No headache power (for Deirdre)

Deirdre McCloskey’s comment leads me to try to give a “no headache” treatment of some key points about the power of a statistical test. (Trigger warning: formal stat people may dislike the informality of my exercise.) We all know that for a given test, as the probability of a type 1 error goes down the probability of a type 2 […]

Read more »

How to specify an informed prior in JAGS/BUGS

January 3, 2015
By

An emailer asks about how to specify an informed prior in JAGS/BUGS. Here are some condensed excerpts of the question and my reply. Of course, while the discussion here refers to JAGS/BUGS, the same considerations apply to Stan.Dear Prof. Kruschke,&nbs...

Read more »

“Why continue to teach and use hypothesis testing?”

January 3, 2015
By

Greg Werbin points us to an online discussion of the following question: Why continue to teach and use hypothesis testing (with all its difficult concepts and which are among the most statistical sins) for problems where there is an interval estimator (confidence, bootstrap, credibility or whatever)? What is the best explanation (if any) to be […] The post “Why continue to teach and use hypothesis testing?” appeared first on Statistical…

Read more »

Philly’s Best Coffee

January 3, 2015
By

Happy New Year! Here's something to keep Philly locals and visitors awake in 2015 -- my list of Philly's best coffee shops. Who needs Seattle or Portland? Let me know your thoughts regarding type I and type II errors.[***NOTE WELL:  The live ...

Read more »

Inlining Scala Breeze code in R using jvmr and sbt

January 3, 2015
By
Inlining Scala Breeze code in R using jvmr and sbt

[Update: The CRAN package “jvmr” has been replaced by a new package “rscala”. Rather than completely re-write this post, I’ve just created a github gist containing a new function, breezeInterpreter(), which works similarly to the function breezeInit() in this post. Usage information is given at the top of the gist.] Introduction In the previous post … Continue reading Inlining Scala Breeze code in R using jvmr and sbt

Read more »

Inlining Scala Breeze code in R using jvmr and sbt

January 3, 2015
By

[Update: The CRAN package “jvmr” has been replaced by a new package “rscala”. Rather than completely re-write this post, I’ve just created a github gist containing a new function, breezeInterpreter(), which works similarly to the function breezeInit() in this post. Usage information is given at the top of the gist.] Introduction In the previous post … Continue reading Inlining Scala Breeze code in R using jvmr and sbt

Read more »

Stamp of Approval

January 3, 2015
By
Stamp of Approval

After getting a hint of this a few months ago, I've finally tracked down an image of a stamp that will be released this year to celebrate the invention of the World Wide Web using an image I created. Here's...

Read more »

Hard cover print book of DBDA2E back in stock, with 30% discount

January 2, 2015
By
Hard cover print book of DBDA2E back in stock, with 30% discount

Here for link to publisher with 30% discount.The hardcover print book of DBDA2E is finally back in stock at the publisher. Go here for a link to the publisher that has a 30% discount.

Read more »

Calling Scala code from R using jvmr

January 2, 2015
By
Calling Scala code from R using jvmr

[Update: the jvmr package has been replaced by a new package called rscala. I have a new post which explains it.] Introduction In previous posts I have explained why I think that Scala is a good language to use for statistical computing and data science. Despite this, R is very convenient for simple exploratory data … Continue reading Calling Scala code from R using jvmr

Read more »

Calling Scala code from R using jvmr

January 2, 2015
By
Calling Scala code from R using jvmr

[Update: the jvmr package has been replaced by a new package called rscala. I have a new post which explains it.] Introduction In previous posts I have explained why I think that Scala is a good language to use for statistical computing and data science. Despite this, R is very convenient for simple exploratory data … Continue reading Calling Scala code from R using jvmr

Read more »

An experience of EARL

January 2, 2015
By
An experience of EARL

Coordinates: 2014 September 15-17 in the London borough of #rstats. 15th, evening I had just the right number of R bugs so that I could walk to the drinks and arrive fashionably late.  On the way, I realized that I hadn’t been near the Tower of London since the first year I moved to London even […] The post An experience of EARL appeared first on Burns Statistics.

Read more »

Stethoscope as weapon of mass distraction

January 2, 2015
By
Stethoscope as weapon of mass distraction

Macartan Humphreys sent me a Shiny app demonstrating you can get statistical significance from just about any pattern of random numbers. I posted it, and, in response, commenter Rahul wrote: It sure is a cute demo but it’s a bit like insinuating a doctor’s stethoscope is useless by demonstrating ten ways in which it can […] The post Stethoscope as weapon of mass distraction appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

Read more »

Popular posts from The DO Loop in 2014

January 2, 2015
By
Popular posts from The DO Loop in 2014

I published 118 blog posts in 2014. This article presents my most popular posts from 2014 and late 2013. 2014 will always be a special year for me because it was the year that the SAS University Edition was launched. The University Edition means that SAS/IML is available to all […]

Read more »

Blog Contents: Oct.- Dec. 2014

January 2, 2015
By
Blog Contents: Oct.- Dec. 2014

BLOG CONTENTS: OCT – DEC 2014* OCTOBER 2014 10/01 Oy Faye! What are the odds of not conflating simple conditional probability and likelihood with Bayesian success stories? 10/05 Diederik Stapel hired to teach “social philosophy” because students got tired of success stories… or something (rejected post) 10/07 A (Jan 14, 2014) interview with Sir David Cox by “Statistics […]

Read more »

A great start to the year

January 1, 2015
By
A great start to the year

I'd like to start 2015 on a happy note. I enjoyed reading the piece by Steven Rattner in the New York Times called "The Year in Charts". (link) I particularly like the crisp headers, and unfussy language, placing the charts...

Read more »


Subscribe

Email:

  Subscribe