Random Sequence of Heads and Tails: For R Users

October 10, 2013
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Random Sequence of Heads and Tails: For R Users

Rick Wicklin on the SAS blog made a post today on how to tell if a sequence of coin flips were random.  I figured it was only fair to port the SAS IML code over to R.  Just like Rick Wicklin did in his example this is the Wald-Wolfowitz test for randomness.  I tried to […]

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Calculating AUC the hard way

October 10, 2013
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Calculating AUC the hard way

The Area Under the Receiver Operator Curve is a commonly used metric of model performance in machine learning and many other binary classification/prediction problems. The idea is to generate a threshold independent measure of how well a model is able to distinguish between two possible outcomes. Threshold independent here just means that for any model […]

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De Novo Transcriptome Assembly with Trinity: Protocol and Videos

October 10, 2013
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De Novo Transcriptome Assembly with Trinity: Protocol and Videos

One of the clearest advantages RNA-seq has over array-based technology for studying gene expression is not needing a reference genome or a pre-existing oligo array. De novo transcriptome assembly allows you to study non-model organisms, cancer cells, o...

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Cancelled NIH study sections: a subtle, yet disastrous, effect of the government shutdown

October 10, 2013
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Editor's note: This post is contributed by Debashis Ghosh. Debashis is the chair of the Biostatistical Methods and Research Design (BMRD) study sections at the National Institutes of Health (NIH).  BMRD's focus is statistical methodology. I write today to discuss effects of … Continue reading →

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Chris Chabris is irritated by Malcolm Gladwell

October 10, 2013
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Chris Chabris is irritated by Malcolm Gladwell

Christopher Chabris reviewed the new book by Malcolm Gladwell: One thing “David and Goliath” shows is that Mr. Gladwell has not changed his own strategy, despite serious criticism of his prior work. What he presents are mostly just intriguing possibilities and musings about human behavior, but what his publisher sells them as, and what his […]The post Chris Chabris is irritated by Malcolm Gladwell appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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That’s Smooth

October 10, 2013
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That’s Smooth

I had someone ask me the other day how to take a scatterplot and draw something other than a straight line through the graph using Excel.  Yes, it can be done in Excel and it’s really quite simple, but there are some limitations when using the stock Excel dialog screens. So it is probably in […]

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The Seven Year Itch

October 10, 2013
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The Seven Year Itch

Eagereyes.org turned seven years old last week, on October 1st. Seven years is a long time on the web. In dog years, the site is almost fifty years old! Has it lost its edge? Have I gone soft? Where is the bite? Where is the fight? The Establishment This site has become a part of […]

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Bad statistics: crime or free speech (II)? Harkonen update: Phil Stat / Law /Stock

October 10, 2013
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Bad statistics: crime or free speech (II)? Harkonen update: Phil Stat / Law /Stock

There’s an update (with overview) on the infamous Harkonen case in Nature with the dubious title “Uncertainty on Trial“, first discussed in my (11/13/12) post “Bad statistics: Crime or Free speech”, and continued here. The new Nature article quotes from Steven Goodman: “You don’t want to have on the books a conviction for a practice that many […]

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Diagrams for hierarchical models – we need your opinion

October 9, 2013
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Diagrams for hierarchical models – we need your opinion

When trying to understand a hierarchical model, I find it helpful to make a diagram of the dependencies between variables. But I have found the traditional directed acyclic graphs (DAGs) to be incomplete at best and downright confusing at worst. Theref...

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Mister P: What’s its secret sauce?

October 9, 2013
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Mister P:  What’s its secret sauce?

This is a long and technical post on an important topic: the use of multilevel regression and poststratification (MRP) to estimate state-level public opinion. MRP as a research method, and state-level opinion (or, more generally, attitudes in demographic and geographic subpopulation) as a subject, have both become increasingly important in political science—and soon, I expect, […]The post Mister P: What’s its secret sauce? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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The Care and Feeding of Your Scientist Collaborator

October 9, 2013
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Editor’s Note: This post written by Roger Peng is part of a two-part series on Scientist-Statistician interactions. The first post was written by Elizabeth C. Matsui, an Associate Professor in the Division of Allergy and Immunology at the Johns Hopkins … Continue reading →

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Robert G Brown (1923-2013)

October 9, 2013
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Robert G Brown (1923-2013)

Robert Goodell Brown was the father of exponential smoothing. He died last week at the age of 90. While I never met him, I was indebted to him for exponential smoothing and his practical and insightful books. Today I received this email from King Harrison III advising of his death. Twenty years ago I attended the ISF 93 conference in Pittsburgh, which honored Bob Brown on his 70th birthday, and…

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How to tell whether a sequence of heads and tails is random

October 9, 2013
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How to tell whether a sequence of heads and tails is random

While walking in the woods, a statistician named Goldilocks wanders into a cottage and discovers three bears. The bears, being hungry, threaten to eat the young lady, but Goldilocks begs them to give her a chance to win her freedom. The bears agree. While Mama Bear and Papa Bear block [...]

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The (third) runway bride

October 9, 2013
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The (third) runway bride

I think I should disclaim the conflict of interest in this one (since Marta is one of the authors of the paper), but it was really, really cool to see her study on the impact on health of noise pollution close to airports in the newspapers today (for e...

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Introduction aux GLM

October 9, 2013
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Cette semaine, on finit la régression de Poisson (temporairement) avant de présenter la théorie des GLM. Les transparents sont en ligne. On en aura besoin pour aller plus loin sur les modèles avec surdispersion, pour modéliser la fréquence de sin...

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Some heuristics about spline smoothing

October 9, 2013
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Some heuristics about spline smoothing

Let us continue our discussion on smoothing techniques in regression. Assume that . where is some unkown function, but assumed to be sufficently smooth. For instance, assume that  is continuous, that exists, and is continuous, that  exists and is also continuous, etc. If  is smooth enough, Taylor’s expansion can be used. Hence, for which can also be writen as for some ‘s. The first part is simply a polynomial. The second…

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Some heuristics about local regression and kernel smoothing

October 9, 2013
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Some heuristics about local regression and kernel smoothing

In a standard linear model, we assume that . Alternatives can be considered, when the linear assumption is too strong. Polynomial regression A natural extension might be to assume some polynomial function, Again, in the standard linear model approach (with a conditional normal distribution using the GLM terminology), parameters can be obtained using least squares, where a regression of  on  is considered. Even if this polynomial model is not the…

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Happy birthday

October 8, 2013
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Happy birthday

Sylvia Richardson (who's now the head of the MRC Biostatistics Unit in Cambridge, and part of our RDD project) asks me to advertise the MRC Biostatistic Unit's Centenary Conference, which will be held in Queens' College Cambridge on March 26t...

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Video killed the radio stars

October 8, 2013
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Francisco tells me that they have uploaded my talk (which I gave last week in ULPGC). I haven't seen it all, but the bit I did see is not too bad, I thought... Check it out! 

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What the data doesn’t tell you

October 8, 2013
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Andrew Gelman recently commented on the difficulties of measuring or interpreting just about anything, and gave an example about sexual harassment in the Marine Corps. I wanted to relay a story. There is no general conclusion to be drawn that I can see...

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The Care and Feeding of the Biostatistician

October 8, 2013
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Editor’s Note: This guest post was written by Elizabeth C. Matsui, an Associate Professor in the Division of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. I’ve been collaborating with Roger for several years now and we … Continue reading →

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A Bayesian approach for peer-review panels? and a speculation about Bruno Frey

October 8, 2013
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Daniel Sgroi and Andrew Oswald write: Many governments wish to assess the quality of their universities. A prominent example is the UK’s new Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014. In the REF, peer-review panels will be provided with information on publications and citations. This paper suggests a way in which panels could choose the weights to […]The post A Bayesian approach for peer-review panels? and a speculation about Bruno Frey appeared…

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Revisiting the Syria chart

October 8, 2013
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Revisiting the Syria chart

New York/Tri-State residents: Meet me at NYU Bookstore tonight, 6-7:30 pm. (link) *** When I wrote about the graphic showing the vote distribution around Syria in the Congress a few posts ago (link), readers offered opinions about what's a better...

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