More on the PACE (chronic fatigue syndrome study) scandal

December 25, 2015
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More on the PACE (chronic fatigue syndrome study) scandal

Last week we reported on the push to get the data released from that controversial PACE study on chronic fatigue syndrome. Julie Rehmeyer points to a news article with background on the story: Patients rapidly discovered serious scientific problems with the 2011 Lancet paper. Despite these errors, the study, known as the PACE trial, went […] The post More on the PACE (chronic fatigue syndrome study) scandal appeared first on…

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You’ll never guess how we answer this question: “Am I doing myself a disservice by being too idealistic in a corporate environment?”

December 24, 2015
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A student writes: I’m an undergrad, going into my 4th year. Over the course of my Business-Economics major and Gerontology minor, I’ve developed a burning interest in modeling and analysis and a smoldering distrust of most everything else in the field. I’m just finishing a summer internship I’ve spent the summer in the new Predictive […] The post You’ll never guess how we answer this question: “Am I doing myself…

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Modeling How Consumers Simplify the Purchase Process by Copying Others

December 23, 2015
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Modeling How Consumers Simplify the Purchase Process by Copying Others

A Flower That Fits the BillMarketing borrows the biological notion of coevolution to explain the progressive "fit" between products and consumers. While evolutionary time may seem a bit slow for product innovation and adoption, the same metaphor can be...

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In Love with Data

December 23, 2015
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In Love with Data

An amazing, year-long, analog data drawing project made by two women: Giorgia Lupi and Stefanie Posavec. ‘Each week we collect and measure a particular type of data about our lives, use this data to make a drawing on a postcard-sized sheet of paper, and then drop the postcard in an English “postbox” (Stefanie) or an American “mailbox” … Continue reading In Love with Data

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R sucks

December 23, 2015
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I’m doing an analysis and one of the objects I’m working on is a multidimensional array called “attitude.” I took a quick look: > dim(attitude) [1] 30 7 Huh? It’s not supposed to be 30 x 7. Whassup? I search through my scripts for a “attitude” but all I find is the three-dimensional array. Where […] The post R sucks appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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“Journalistic lapses at the New York Times should, in effect, count triple”

December 22, 2015
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“Journalistic lapses at the New York Times should, in effect, count triple”

Palko, writing about the latest Judith Miller Matt Apuzzo, Michael Schmidt, and Julia Preston story: There is no publication in the country, perhaps even in the world, with a reputation like that of the New York Times. It is almost universally considered the standard for American newspapers. For that reason, I would argue that journalistic […] The post “Journalistic lapses at the New York Times should, in effect, count triple”…

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Bayesian Item Response Theory in JAGS: A Hierarchical Two Parameter Logistic Model

December 22, 2015
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Bayesian Item Response Theory in JAGS: A Hierarchical Two Parameter Logistic Model

I recently created a hierarchical two-parameter logistic model for item response theory (IRT). The JAGS script is now in the folder of scripts that accompany the book (available at the book's web site; click book cover at right). Below are slides ...

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End-of-Year Reading

December 22, 2015
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End-of-Year Reading

Wishing all readers a very special holiday season!Agiakloglou, C., and C. Agiropoulos, 2016. The balance between size and power in testing for linear association for two stationary AR(1) processes. Applied Economics Letters, 23, 230-234.Allen, D., M. M...

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He’s skeptical about Neuroskeptic’s skepticism

December 22, 2015
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Jim Delaney writes: Through a link in the weekend reads on Retraction Watch, I read Neuroskeptic’s post-publication peer review of a study on an antidepressant application of the drug armodafinil. Neuroskeptic’s main criticism is that he/she feels that a “conclusion” in the abstract is misleading, “… Adjunctive armodafinil 150 mg/day reduced depressive symptoms associated with […] The post He’s skeptical about Neuroskeptic’s skepticism appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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R and Python: Gradient Descent

December 22, 2015
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One of the problems often dealt in Statistics is minimization of the objective function. And contrary to the linear models, there is no analytical solution for models that are nonlinear on the parameters such as logistic regression, neural networks, an...

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Post mortem

December 22, 2015
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Post mortem

This is again a guest post, mainly written by Roberto, which I only slightly edited (and if significantly so, I am making it clear by adding text in italics and in square brackets, like [this]). By the way, the pic on the left shows my favourite pathol...

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Link: What Happened in Vis in 2015? Year Review Episode of Data Stories

December 22, 2015
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Link: What Happened in Vis in 2015? Year Review Episode of Data Stories

In time-honored tradition, Andy Kirk and I review the year in visualization on the Data Stories podcast. We chat with Enrico and Moritz about blogs, projects, people, and all the other things that happened and changed (or didn’t) this year. There are lots of good links in the podcast blog posting related to the things … Continue reading Link: What Happened in Vis in 2015? Year Review Episode of Data…

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Gender Effect in Conference Talks

December 22, 2015
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Gender Effect in Conference Talks

I was searching in the arXiv repository for an interesting paper to read over the weekend, when I found this: “Studying Gender in Conference Talks – data from the 223rd meeting of the American Astronomical Society”. The title and figures caught m...

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Gender Effect in Conference Talks

December 22, 2015
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Gender Effect in Conference Talks

I was searching in the arXiv repository for an interesting paper to read over the weekend, when I found this: “Studying Gender in Conference Talks – data from the 223rd meeting of the American Astronomical Society”. The title and figures caught m...

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Gender Effect in Conference Talks

December 22, 2015
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Gender Effect in Conference Talks

I was searching in the arXiv repository for an interesting paper to read over the weekend, when I found this: “Studying Gender in Conference Talks – data from the 223rd meeting of the American Astronomical Society”. The title and figures caught m...

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Gender Effect in Conference Talks

December 22, 2015
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Gender Effect in Conference Talks

I was searching in the arXiv repository for an interesting paper to read over the weekend, when I found this: “Studying Gender in Conference Talks – data from the 223rd meeting of the American Astronomical Society”. The title and figures caught m...

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The longer it has taken, the longer it will take

December 21, 2015
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The longer it has taken, the longer it will take

Suppose project completion time follows a Pareto (power law) distribution with parameter α. That is, for t > 1, the probability that completion time is bigger than t is t-α. (We start out time at t = 1 because that makes the calculations a little simpler.) Now suppose we know that a project has lasted […]

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A non-comprehensive list of awesome things other people did in 2015

December 21, 2015
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Editor's Note: This is the third year I'm making a list of awesome things other people did this year. Just like the lists for 2013 and 2014 I am doing this off the top of my head.   I have avoided talking about stuff I worked on or that people here at Hopkins are doing

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Rapid post-publication review

December 21, 2015
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A colleague points me to a published paper and writes: Do you believe this finding? If your biology isn’t strong enough to pass judgement — mine certainly isn’t — can you ask somebody who knows? My reply: 4 groups with a total n=71? No way. The topic is too sad for me to mock on […] The post Rapid post-publication review appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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On deck this week

December 21, 2015
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Mon: Rapid post-publication review Tues: He’s skeptical about Neuroskeptic’s skepticism Wed: R sucks Thurs: You’ll never guess how we answer this question: “Am I doing myself a disservice by being too idealistic in a corporate environment?” Fri: Gresham’s Law of experimental methods Sat: Turbulent Studies, Rocky Statistics: Publicational Consequences of Experiencing Inferential Instability Sun: There […] The post On deck this week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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“Once I was told to try every possible specification of a dependent variable (count, proportion, binary indicator, you name it) in a regression until I find a significant relationship. That is it, no justification for choosing one specification over another besides finding significance. . . . In another occasion I was asked to re-write a theory section of a paper to reflect an incidental finding from our analysis, so that it shows up as if we were asking a question about the incidental finding and had come up with the supported hypothesis a priori. . . .”

December 21, 2015
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Ethan Bolker points me to this discussion. My reply: As discussed in my paper with Hill and Yajima, I think the best approach is to analyze all comparisons rather than picking just some. If there is prior understanding that some comparisons are more important than others, that understanding can be included as predictors in the […] The post “Once I was told to try every possible specification of a dependent…

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Making data analysis easier

December 20, 2015
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Making data analysis easier

Di Cook and I are organizing a workshop on “Making data analysis easier” for 18-19 February 2016. We are calling it WOMBAT2016, which an acronym for Workshop Organized by the Monash Business Analytics Team. Appropriately, it will be held at...

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Death of a statistician

December 20, 2015
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Death of a statistician

It’s not often that one of our profession earns an obituary in the New York Times: Lawrence R. Herkimer, who elevated cheerleading into an aspirational goal for generations of youths and a highly successful business for himself, organizing camps for would-be cheerleaders and selling the clothing and gear they would need, died on Wednesday in […] The post Death of a statistician appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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