Books to Read While the Algae Grow in Your Fur, June 2016

July 6, 2016
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Attention conservation notice: I have no taste. Oliver Morton, The Planet Remade: How Geoengineering Could Change the World This is just as impressive, enlightening, gracefully-written and thoughtful as I'd expect from the author of Eaters of the S...

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Gremlins in the work of Amy J. C. Cuddy, Michael I. Norton, and Susan T. Fiske

July 5, 2016
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Gremlins in the work of Amy J. C. Cuddy, Michael I. Norton, and Susan T. Fiske

Remember that “gremlins” paper by environmental economist Richard Tol? The one that had almost as many errors as data points? The one where, each time a correction was issued, more problems would spring up? (I’d say “hydra-like” but I’d rather not mix my mythical-beast metaphors.) Well, we’ve got another one. This time, nothing to do […] The post Gremlins in the work of Amy J. C. Cuddy, Michael I. Norton,…

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“Positive Results Are Better for Your Career”

July 5, 2016
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Brad Stiritz writes: I thought you might enjoy reading the following Der Spiegel interview with Peter Wilmshurst. Talk about fighting the good fight! He took the path of greatest resistance, and he beat what I presume are pretty stiff odds. Then the company representatives asked me to leave some of the patients out of the […] The post “Positive Results Are Better for Your Career” appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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Ethical dilemmas in data science and analytics

July 5, 2016
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Ethical dilemmas in data science and analytics

About half a year ago, when my article on ethics in data science appeared on Harvard Business Review, the second half of the piece was dropped. In the omitted section, I had designed a poll inviting readers to opine on several ethical dilemmas facing real-world data analysts. In April, Manoj Chari read my HBR article and kindly invited me to speak on the subject at the INFORMS Analytics Conference, and…

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Recommended Reading for July

July 5, 2016
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Recommended Reading for July

Now that the Canada Day and Independence Day celebrations are behind (some of) us, it's time for some serious reading at the cottage. Here are some suggestions for you:Farmer, R. E. A., 2015. The stock market crash really did cause the great recession....

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Cantor sets, the devil’s staircase, and probability

July 5, 2016
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Cantor sets, the devil’s staircase, and probability

Last week I blogged about how to draw the Cantor function in SAS. The Cantor function is used in mathematics as a pathological example of a function that is constant almost everywhere yet somehow manages to "climb upwards," thus earning the nickname "the devil's staircase." The Cantor function has three […] The post Cantor sets, the devil's staircase, and probability appeared first on The DO Loop.

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Fire and mouse alarm

July 5, 2016
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Fire and mouse alarm

Yesterday we finally had our workshop on infectious disease modelling in health economic evaluation. I think the day went very well and we had very interesting talks (as soon as I can, I will upload the slides on the website above, for all the speakers...

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Notes from 3rd and 3.5th Bayesian Mixer Meetup

July 5, 2016
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Notes from 3rd and 3.5th Bayesian Mixer Meetup

Two Bayesian Mixer meet-ups in a row. Can it get any better?Our third 'regular' meeting took place at Cass Business School on 24 June. Big thanks to Pietro and Andreas, who supported us from Cass. The next day, Jon Sedar of Applied AI, managed to arran...

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New, Improved Traveling Presidential Candidate Map

July 5, 2016
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New, Improved Traveling Presidential Candidate Map

Many years ago, when this website was still young, I created a map of all the ZIP codes in the U.S. in numeric order and then wondered about the shortest path through all of them. I dubbed that The Traveling Presidential Candidate Map. Here is an improved version that’s interactive and much more efficient than the … Continue reading New, Improved Traveling Presidential Candidate Map

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Not So Standard Deviations Episode 18 – Back on Planet Earth

July 5, 2016
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With Hilary fresh from Use R! 2016, Hilary and I discuss some of the highlights from the conference. Also, some followup about a previous Free Advertising and the NSSD drinking game. If you have questions you’d like us to answer, you can send them t...

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“Merciless Indian savages”

July 4, 2016
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Paul Alper writes: Early this July Fourth morning I was listening to NPR’s Morning Edition do its annual Declaration of Independence reading; deep into the reading of grievances against the King of England I suddenly heard the unsettling phrase, “merciless Indian savages”: He has excited domestic insurrections amongst us, and has endeavored to bring on […] The post “Merciless Indian savages” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social…

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Americans (used to) love world government

July 4, 2016
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Americans (used to) love world government

Sociologist David Weakliem writes: It appears that an overwhelming majority of Americans who have an opinion on the subject think that Britain should remain in the European Union. But how many would support the United States joining an organization like the EU? My guess is very few. But back in 1946, the Gallup Poll asked […] The post Americans (used to) love world government appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal…

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On deck this week

July 4, 2016
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Mon: Americans (used to) love world government Tues: “Positive Results Are Better for Your Career” Wed: “I would like to share some sad stories from economics related to these issues” Thurs: Happiness formulas Fri: “Participants reported being hungrier when they walked into the café (mean = 7.38, SD = 2.20) than when they walked out […] The post On deck this week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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correlation matrices on copulas

July 3, 2016
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correlation matrices on copulas

Following my post of yesterday about the missing condition in Lynch’s R code, Gérard Letac sent me a paper he recently wrote with Luc Devroye on correlation matrices and copulas. Paper written for the memorial volume in honour of Marc Yor. It considers the neat problem of the existence of a copula (on [0,1]x…x[0,1]) associated […]

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Data science as the application of theoretical knowledge

July 3, 2016
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Patrick Atwater writes: Insights that “much of what’s hard looks easy” and it’s about “getting the damn data” highlight important points that much of the tech-ey industry dominating definitions overlook in the excitement about production ML recommendation systems and the like. Working to build from that grounded perspective, I penned together a quick piece digging […] The post Data science as the application of theoretical knowledge appeared first on Statistical…

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DAG Software

July 3, 2016
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Some time ago I mentioned the DAG (directed acyclical graph) primer by Judea Pearl et al.  As noted in Pearl's recent blog post, a manual will be available with software solutions based on a DAGitty R package.  See http://dagit...

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Too good to be true: when overwhelming mathematics fails to convince

July 2, 2016
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Gordon Danning points me to this news article by Lisa Zyga, “Why too much evidence can be a bad thing,” reporting on a paper by Lachlan Gunn and others. Their conclusions mostly seem reasonable, if a bit exaggerated. For example, I can’t believe this: The researchers demonstrated the paradox in the case of a modern-day […] The post Too good to be true: when overwhelming mathematics fails to convince appeared…

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“Simple, Scalable and Accurate Posterior Interval Estimation”

July 1, 2016
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Cheng Li, Sanvesh Srivastava, and David Dunson write: We propose a new scalable algorithm for posterior interval estimation. Our algorithm first runs Markov chain Monte Carlo or any alternative posterior sampling algorithm in parallel for each subset posterior, with the subset posteriors proportional to the prior multiplied by the subset likelihood raised to the full […] The post “Simple, Scalable and Accurate Posterior Interval Estimation” appeared first on Statistical Modeling,…

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Informative priors for treatment effects

July 1, 2016
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Biostatistician Garnett McMillan writes: A PI recently completed a randomized trial where the experimental treatment showed a large, but not quite statistically significant (p=0.08) improvement over placebo. The investigators wanted to know how many additional subjects would be needed to achieve significance. This is a common question, which is very hard to answer for non-statistical […] The post Informative priors for treatment effects appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Horrible attack in Turkey

July 1, 2016
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I don’t have anything to say about this, nor I think did I blog on the attacks in Florida or Paris or all the terrible things going on in the Middle East every day. It’s not my area of expertise and I don’t have anything particular to add. I’m only posting this note here because […] The post Horrible attack in Turkey appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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Computational foreign language learning: a study in Spanish verbs usage

June 30, 2016
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Computational foreign language learning: a study in Spanish verbs usage

Abstract: I did some computer-y stuff to construct a personal Spanish text corpus and create a Spanish verb study guide specifically tailored to the linguistic variety of Spanish I intend to consume and produce. It worked fairly well. It also… Continue reading →

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Syntax Highlight Code in Keynote or Powerpoint

June 30, 2016
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Syntax Highlight Code in Keynote or Powerpoint

I came across this awesome gist explaining how to syntax highlight code in Keynote. The same trick works for Powerpoint. Mac only.Install homebrew if you don’t have it already and brew install highlight.highlight -O rtf myfile.ext | pbcopy to highlig...

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Syntax Highlight Code in Keynote or Powerpoint

June 30, 2016
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Syntax Highlight Code in Keynote or Powerpoint

I came across this awesome gist explaining how to syntax highlight code in Keynote. The same trick works for Powerpoint. Mac only.Install homebrew if you don’t have it already and brew install highlight.highlight -O rtf myfile.ext | pbcopy to highlig...

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