Jim Albert’s Baseball Blog

January 20, 2016
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Jim Albert’s Baseball Blog

Jim Albert has a baseball blog: Baseball with R I sent a link internally to people I knew were into baseball, to which Andrew replied, “I agree that it’s cool that he doesn’t just talk, he has code.” (No kidding—the latest post as of writing this was on an R package to compute value above […] The post Jim Albert’s Baseball Blog appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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Time-Varying Dynamic Factor Loadings

January 20, 2016
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Check out Mikkelsen et al. (2015).  I've always wanted to try high-dimensional dynamic factor models (DFM's) with time-varying loadings as an approach to network connectedness measurement (e.g., increasing connectedness would correspond to increas...

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My talk Fri 1pm at the University of Chicago

January 20, 2016
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It’s the Data Science and Public Policy colloquium, and they asked me to give my talk, Little Data: How Traditional Statistical Ideas Remain Relevant in a Big-Data World. Here’s the abstract: “Big Data” is more than a slogan; it is our modern world in which we learn by combining information from diverse sources of varying […] The post My talk Fri 1pm at the University of Chicago appeared first on…

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Banking to 45 degrees: Aspect ratios for time series plots

January 20, 2016
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Banking to 45 degrees: Aspect ratios for time series plots

In SAS, the aspect ratio of a graph is the physical height of the graph divided by the physical width. Recently I demonstrated how to set the aspect ratio of graphs in SAS by using the ASPECT= option in PROC SGPLOT or by using the OVERLAYEQUATED statement in the Graph […] The post Banking to 45 degrees: Aspect ratios for time series plots appeared first on The DO Loop.

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ACEMS Business Analytics Prize 2016

January 20, 2016
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ACEMS Business Analytics Prize 2016

We have established a new annual prize for research students at Monash University in the general area of business analytics, funded by the Australian Centre of Excellence in Mathematical and Statistical Frontiers (ACEMS). The rules of the award are lis...

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Who are Turkopticon’s Top Contributors?

January 19, 2016
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Who are Turkopticon’s Top Contributors?

In my most recent post "Turkopticon: Defender of Amazon's Anonymous Workforce" I introduced Turkopticon, the social art project designed to provide basic tools for Amazon's massive Mechanical TURK workforce to share information about employers (request...

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New digital feature editorship at the Psychonomic Society

January 19, 2016
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As of January 1, 2016, I am the new methods editor for the Psychonomic Society digital features. Steve Lewandowsky has written an introductory post with a bit of background, and my first post -- about Arsenault and Buchsbaum's recent article in Psychon...

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Stan Talk in NYC: Macroeconomic Forecasting using Analogy Weighting

January 19, 2016
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This post is by Eric. The next Stan meetup is coming up in February. It will be hosted by the New York Bayesian Data Analysis Meetup group and International Securities Exchange. The BDA group was formerly called Stan Users – NYC. We will still be focusing on Stan, but we would also like to open it up […] The post Stan Talk in NYC: Macroeconomic Forecasting using Analogy Weighting appeared first on…

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The failure to replicate scientific findings

January 19, 2016
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Andrew Gelman and I have published a piece in Slate, discussing the failure to replicate scientific findings, using the recent example of the so-called power pose. The idea of the "power pose" is that people develop psychological and hormonal changes by making this "power pose" before walking into business meetings, whereupon these changes make them more powerful. As you often read here and at Gelman's blog, the fact that someone…

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Middle-aged white death trends update: It’s all about women in the south

January 19, 2016
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Middle-aged white death trends update:  It’s all about women in the south

Jonathan Auerbach and I wrote up some of the age-adjustment stuff we discussed on this blog a couple months ago. Here’s our article, a shorter version of which will appear as a letter in PPNAS. And here’s the new analysis we did showing age-adjusted death rates for 45-54-year-old non-Hispanic white men and women: Wow!! Remember […] The post Middle-aged white death trends update: It’s all about women in the south…

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Formatting table output in R

January 19, 2016
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Formatting table output in R

Formatting data for output in a table can be a bit of a pain in R. The package formattable by Kun Ren and Kenton Russell provides some intuitive functions to create good looking tables for the R console or HTML quickly. The package home page demonstrat...

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My namesake doesn’t seem to understand the principles of decision analysis

January 18, 2016
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My namesake doesn’t seem to understand the principles of decision analysis

It says “Never miss another deadline.” But if you really could never miss your deadlines, you’d just set your deadlines earlier, no? It’s statics vs. dynamics all over again. That said, this advice seems reasonable: The author has also developed a foolproof method of structuring your writing, so that you make effective use of your […] The post My namesake doesn’t seem to understand the principles of decision analysis appeared…

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On deck this week

January 18, 2016
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Mon: My namesake doesn’t seem to understand the principles of decision analysis Tues: Middle-aged white death trends update: It’s all about women in the south Wed: My talk Fri 1pm at the University of Chicago Thurs: If you’re using Stata and you want to do Bayes, you should be using StataStan Fri: One quick tip […] The post On deck this week appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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MCqMC 2016

January 18, 2016
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MCqMC 2016

After the MCqMC 2014 conference in Leuven I enjoyed very much, the MCqMC 2016 instalment takes place in Stanford this (late) summer. I cannot alas attend it, as I will be in Australia all summer winter, but the program looks terrific! As Art’s tutorial so brilliantly showed at MCMskv last week, the connections between the […]

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Confidence Regions for Parameters in the Simplex

January 18, 2016
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Confidence Regions for Parameters in the Simplex

Consider here the case where, in some parametric inference problem, parameter  is a point in the Simplex, For instance, consider some regression, on compositional data, > library(compositions) > data(DiagnosticProb) > Y=DiagnosticProb[,"type"]-1 > X=DiagnosticProb[,c("A","B","C")] > model = glm(Y~ilr(X),family=binomial) > b = ilrInv(coef(model)[-1],orig=X) > as.numeric(b) [1] 0.3447106 0.2374977 0.4177917 We can visualize that estimator on the simplex, using > tripoint=function(s){ + p=s/sum(s) + abc2xy(matrix(p,1,3)) + } > lab=LETTERS[1:3] > xl=c(-.1,1.25) > yl=c(-.1,1.15) >…

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Create a SAS macro variable that contains a list of values

January 18, 2016
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Create a SAS macro variable that contains a list of values

Parameters in SAS procedures are specified a list of values that you manually type into the procedure syntax. For example, if you want to specify a list of percentile values in PROC UNIVARIATE, you need to type the values into the PCTLPTS= option as follows: proc univariate data=sashelp.cars noprint; var […] The post Create a SAS macro variable that contains a list of values appeared first on The DO Loop.

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Measuring Policy Uncertainty and its Effects

January 18, 2016
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Fascinating work like Baker, Bloom and Davis (2015) has for some time had me interested in defining and measuring policy uncertainty and its effects. A plausible hypothesis is that policy uncertainty, like inflation uncertainty, reduces aggre...

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Grizzly Adams is an object of the class Weekend at Bernies

January 18, 2016
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Grizzly Adams is an object of the class Weekend at Bernies

It just came to me when I saw his obit. The post Grizzly Adams is an object of the class Weekend at Bernies appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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The normal distribution – three tricky bits

January 18, 2016
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The normal distribution – three tricky bits

There are several tricky things about teaching and understanding the normal distribution, and in this post I’m going to talk about three of them. They are the idea of a model, the limitations of the normal distribution, and the idea … Continue reading →

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Set up RStudio in the cloud to work with GitHub

January 17, 2016
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Set up RStudio in the cloud to work with GitHub

I love GitHub for version control and collaboration, though I'm no master of it. And the tools for integrating git and GitHub with RStudio are just amazing boons to productivity. Unfortunately, my University-supplied computer does not play well with ...

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Nina Zumel and John Mount part of R Day at Strata + Hadoop World in San Jose 2016

January 17, 2016
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Nina Zumel and I are honored to have been invited to be part of Strata + Hadoop World in San Jose 2016 R Day organized by RStudio and O’Reilly. We have written a lot on the topic of model validation in R and we are very excited to distill it down to an exciting tutorial. … Continue reading Nina Zumel and John Mount part of R Day at Strata +…

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A simple ANOVA

January 17, 2016
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A simple ANOVA

I was browsing Davies Design and Analysis of Industrial Experiments (second edition, 1967). Published by for ICI in times when industry did that kind of thing. It is quite an applied book. On page 107 there is an example where the variance of a pr...

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The devil really is in the details; or, You’ll be able to guess who I think are the good guys and who I think are the bad guys in this story, but I think it’s still worth telling because it provides some insight into how (some) scientists view statistics

January 17, 2016
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I noticed this on Retraction Watch: “Scientists clearly cannot rely on the traditional avenues for correcting problems in the literature.” PubPeer responds to an editorial slamming the site. I’ve never actually read anything on PubPeer but I understand it’s a post-publication review site, and I like post-publication review. So I’m heading into this one on […] The post The devil really is in the details; or, You’ll be able to…

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