Too Good To Be True: The Scientific Mass Production of Spurious Statistical Significance

July 24, 2013
By

Are women three times more likely to wear red or pink when they are most fertile? No, probably not. But here’s how hardworking researchers, prestigious scientific journals, and gullible journalists have been fooled into believing so. The paper I’ll be talking about appeared online this month in Psychological Science, the flagship journal of the Association […]The post Too Good To Be True: The Scientific Mass Production of Spurious Statistical Significance…

Read more »

Making infographics using R and Inkscape

July 24, 2013
By
Making infographics using R and Inkscape

I have been making charts with R for almost as long as I have been using R, and with good reason: R is an amazing tool for filtering and visualizing data. With R, and particularly if we use the excellent ggplot2 library, we can go from raw data to com...

Read more »

Recently in the sister blog

July 24, 2013
By

Would You Accept DNA From A Murderer? The post Recently in the sister blog appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

Read more »

JSM 2013

July 24, 2013
By
JSM 2013

Next week I'll head to the Joint Statistical Meeting (the annual conference of the American Statistical Association), which funnily enough this year will be held in beautiful Montreal, Canada.I've been once to Montreal for a couple of days an...

Read more »

Some interviews, and an event

July 24, 2013
By

Here are two recent profiles of me: Oracle's Profit: "Beyond Big Data" (link) ASA News (link) In the second one, they asked me to give advice to people who are interested in getting into data visualization. Here is my answer: Keep sketching, and keep trashing. Settle your story and then find the tools, never the other way around. Hate the default. Imagine your audience. If you don’t have an audience,…

Read more »

Luck in sports visualized

July 24, 2013
By
Luck in sports visualized

Luck is not easy to nail down in a number. For the fantasy football league, I have a way of looking at luck. One aspect of luck is which team you are matched up with in any given week. There...

Read more »

Archival, Analysis, and Visualization of #ISMBECCB 2013 Tweets

July 24, 2013
By
Archival, Analysis, and Visualization of #ISMBECCB 2013 Tweets

As the 2013 ISMB/ECCB meeting is winding down, I archived and analyzed the 2000+ tweets from the meeting using a set of bash and R scripts I previously blogged about.The archive of all the tweets tagged #ISMBECCB from July 19-24, 2013 is and ...

Read more »

Making infographics using R and Inkscape

July 24, 2013
By
Making infographics using R and Inkscape

I have been making charts with R for almost as long as I have been using R, and with good reason: R is an amazing tool for filtering and visualizing data. With R, and particularly if we use the excellent ggplot2 library, we can go from raw data to compelling visualization in minutes. But what if we want to give our visualizations an extra kick? What if we want to…

Read more »

Implement the truncated normal distribution in SAS

July 24, 2013
By
Implement the truncated normal distribution in SAS

This article describes how to implement the truncated normal distribution in SAS. Although the implementation in this article uses the SAS/IML language, you can also implement the ideas and formulas by using the DATA step and PROC FCMP. For reference, I recommend the Wikipedia article on the truncated normal distribution. [...]

Read more »

THE FIVE: Jeff Leek’s Challenge

July 24, 2013
By
THE FIVE: Jeff Leek’s Challenge

Jeff Leek, over at Simply Statistics asks an interesting question: What are the 5 most influential statistics papers of 2000-2010? I found this to be incredibly difficult to answer. Eventually, I came up with this list: Donoho, David (2006). Compressed sensing. IEEE Transactions on Information Theory. 52, 1289-1306. Greenshtein, Eitan and Ritov, Ya’Acov. (2004). Persistence … … Continue reading →

Read more »

Old Statistics Books

July 23, 2013
By
Old Statistics Books

Thanks to retirement of our faculty members, a large collection of old books on Statistics appeared in the lunch room. All right, can you guess what is the oldest book I found among them? Of course it is called “Mathematical Statistics”, which is written by Henry Lewis Rietz (Professor of Mathematics, The University of Iowa). […]

Read more »

Statistics and open data

July 23, 2013
By
Statistics and open data

From: http://www.parliament.uk/business/committees/committees-a-z/commons-select/public-administration-select-committee/news/statistics-and-open-data/11 July 2013The Public Administration Select Committee (PASC) is conducting an inquiry into statistics...

Read more »

Christakis response to my comment on his comments on social science (or just skip to the P.P.P.S. at the end)

July 23, 2013
By

The other day, Nicholas Christakis wrote an article in the newspaper criticizing academic social science departments: The social sciences have stagnated. . . . This is not only boring but also counterproductive, constraining engagement with the scientific cutting edge and stifling the creation of new and useful knowledge. . . . I’m not suggesting that […]The post Christakis response to my comment on his comments on social science (or just…

Read more »

Arguing for Negligible Effects

July 23, 2013
By

I just uploaded a newer version of my re-titled paper "Arguing for a Negligible Effect." You can find the latest version here. It has a "revise and resubmit" at AJPS and I'm sending it back on August 15 (when they re-open after the summer break), so I...

Read more »

Review: Kölner R Meeting 19 July 2013

July 23, 2013
By
Review: Kölner R Meeting 19 July 2013

Despite the hot weather and the beginning of the school holiday season in North Rhine Westphalia the Cologne R user group met yet again for two fascinating talks and beer and schnitzel afterwards.Analysing Twitter data to evaluate the US Dollar / Euro ...

Read more »

Joint Statistical Meeting 2013

July 23, 2013
By
Joint Statistical Meeting 2013

Hey, In a few weeks (August 3-8) I’ll attend the Joint Statistical Meeting in Montréal, Canada. According to Wikipedia it’s been held every year since 1840 and now gathers more than 5,000 participants! I’ll talk in a session organized by Scott Schmidler, entitled Adaptive Monte Carlo Methods for Bayesian Computation; you can find the session […]

Read more »

Top 5 stat papers since 2000?

July 22, 2013
By

Jeff Leek writes: I just wrote this post about what the 5 most influential papers in statistics from 2000-2010. I would be really curious to know your list too? Scarily enough I can’t think of any truly influential papers from that decade. I suppose this means I’m getting old! P.S. I did once make a […]The post Top 5 stat papers since 2000? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

Read more »

Hierarchical Linear Model

July 22, 2013
By
Hierarchical Linear Model

Linear regression probably is the most familiar technique of data analysis, but its application is often hamstrung by model assumptions. For instance, if the data has a hierarchical structure, quite often the assumptions of linear regression are feas...

Read more »

David vs. Goliath in Men’s Professional Tennis

July 22, 2013
By
David vs. Goliath in Men’s Professional Tennis

David dances lightly from side to side, his small feet stirring up wisps of dust from the clay surface. Twirling his racket in anticipation, he peers intently at his colossal foe hoping to spot some clue where the first serve will go. Across the net is...

Read more »

What are the 5 most influential statistics papers of 2000-2010?

July 22, 2013
By

A few folks here at Hopkins were just reading the comments of our post on  awesome young/senior statisticians. It was cool to see the diversity of opinions and all the impressive people working in our field. We realized that another … Continue reading →

Read more »

GMM, the "Strange American Estimator"

July 22, 2013
By

At three separate recent non-American conferences, I heard three separate European econometricians refer to generalized method of moments (GMM) as a "strange American estimator." Needless to say, that raised my eyebrows. One doesn't hear that phrase to...

Read more »

Mugatu is a health economist

July 22, 2013
By
Mugatu is a health economist

When Hansel comes out to save the day preventing "Derek [Zoolander] to off the prime minister of Micronesia", the evil Jacobim Mugatu says "It's that damn Hansel – He's so hot right now!".Quite in a similar fashion(?), it seems as though in the ...

Read more »

My talks that were scheduled for Tues at the Data Skeptics meetup and Wed at the Open Statistical Programming meetup

July 22, 2013
By

Statistical Methods and Data Skepticism Data analysis today is dominated by three paradigms: null hypothesis significance testing, Bayesian inference, and exploratory data analysis. There is concern that all these methods lead to overconfidence on the part of researchers and the general public, and this concern has led to the new “data skepticism” movement. But the […]The post My talks that were scheduled for Tues at the Data Skeptics meetup and…

Read more »


Subscribe

Email:

  Subscribe