More on deconstructing Larry Wasserman (Aris Spanos)

December 28, 2013
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More on deconstructing Larry Wasserman (Aris Spanos)

This follows up on yesterday’s deconstruction:  Aris Spanos (2012)[i] – Comments on: L. Wasserman “Low Assumptions, High Dimensions” (2011)* I’m happy to play devil’s advocate in commenting on Larry’s very interesting and provocative (in a good way) paper on ‘how recent developments in statistical modeling and inference have [a] changed the intended scope of data analysis, […]

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GNU R vs Julia: is it only a matter of devectorization?

December 28, 2013
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Recently I have read a post on benefits of code devectorization in Julia. The examples given there inspired me to perform my own devectorization exercise. I decided to use bootstrapping as a test ground. The results are quite interesting (and not so ba...

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Using randomized incentives as an instrument for survey nonresponse?

December 28, 2013
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I received the following question: Is there a classic paper on instrumenting for survey non-response? some colleagues in public health are going to carry out a survey and I wonder about suggesting that they build in a randomization of response-encouragement (e.g. offering additional $ to a subset of those who don’t respond initially). Can you […]The post Using randomized incentives as an instrument for survey nonresponse? appeared first on Statistical…

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Bubble sorting in R, C++ and Julia: code improvements and the R compiler

December 28, 2013
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In the past few months I have written posts about implementing the bubble sort algorithm in different languages. In the mean while I have gotten some feedback and suggestions regarding improvements to the implementation I made, see the end of… See more ›

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Winter came

December 28, 2013
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Winter came

Generated with pictures from http://nohrsc.noaa.gov/nh_snowcover/ data can be downloaded from ftp://sidads.colorado.edu/DATASETS/NOAA/G02158 See also the Global Sea Ice Area time series, > d=read.table("http://arctic.atmos.uiuc.edu/cryosphere/timeseries.global.anom.1979-2008") > tail(d) V1 V2 V3 V4 12778 2013.984 0.7913005 18.42697 17.63567 12779 2013.986 0.8523080 18.39049 17.53818 12780 2013.989 0.8819072 18.30466 17.42275 12781 2013.992 1.0200537 18.33854 17.31848 12782 2013.995 1.0612829 18.27418 17.21289 12783 2013.997 1.0163171 18.14861 17.13230 > plot(d$V1,d$V3,type="l",ylab="Global Sea Ice Area, million km2")

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(R/Py/Cmd)Stan 2.1.0

December 28, 2013
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We’re happy to announce the release of Stan C++, CmdStan, RStan, and PyStan 2.1.0.  This is a minor feature release, but it is also an important bug fix release.  As always, the place to start is the (all new) Stan web pages: http://mc-stan.org   Major Bug in 2.0.0, 2.0.1 Stan 2.0.0 and Stan 2.0.1 introduced […]The post (R/Py/Cmd)Stan 2.1.0 appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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Deconstructing Larry Wasserman

December 28, 2013
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Deconstructing Larry Wasserman

 Larry Wasserman (“Normal Deviate”) has announced he will stop blogging (for now at least). That means we’re losing one of the wisest blog-voices on issues relevant to statistical foundations (among many other areas in statistics). Whether this lures him back or reaffirms his decision to stay away, I thought I’d reblog my (2012) “deconstruction” of […]

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Knoema – Yet Another Data Engine

December 27, 2013
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Knoema – Yet Another Data Engine

Knoema is another data engine (it's probably time for some sort of bake-off evaluation among these services). In their own words and pictures:

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Leslie Valiant is probably British. Or old.

December 27, 2013
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Leslie Valiant is probably British.  Or old.

I got Leslie Valiant's new book, Probably Approximately Correct, for Christmas.  I'm embarrassed to admit that I was not familiar with the author, especially since he won the Turing Award in 2010.  But I wasn't, and that led to a funny sequen...

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Parallel processing with short jobs only increases the run time

December 27, 2013
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Parallel processing with short jobs only increases the run time

Parallel processing has become much more important over the years as multi-core processors have become common place. From version 02.14 onwards, parallel processing has become part of the standard R installation in the form of the parallel package. This package… See more ›

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Should statistics have a Nobel prize?

December 27, 2013
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Xiao-Li says yes: The most compelling reason for having highly visible awards in any field is to enhance its ability to attract future talent. Virtually all the media and public attention our profession received in recent years has been on the utility of statistics in all walks of life. We are extremely happy for and […]The post Should statistics have a Nobel prize? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference,…

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Sinterklaas and Santa Claus gave presents

December 27, 2013
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Sinterklaas and Santa Claus gave presents

In December my nice little netbook acquired a shiny new openSUSE 13.1, including all the goodies I might want to use in 2014; R, Stan, Julia and Jags. So here is what you might get when you set up a computer for statistics today.JagsI have been using J...

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Statistics unplugged

December 27, 2013
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Statistics unplugged

How much does statistical software help and how much it interferes when teaching statistical concepts? Software used in the practice of statistics (say R, SAS, Stata, etc) brings to the party a mental model that it’s often alien to students, while being highly optimized for practitioners. It is possible to introduce a minimum of distraction […]

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The need to think about what you’re seeing: an incomplete geography lesson

December 27, 2013
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The need to think about what you’re seeing: an incomplete geography lesson

If your chart is titled "The Most Popular TV Show Set in Every State," what would you expect the data to look like? You'd think the list would be dominated by the hit shows like The Walking Dead and Downton...

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The performance gains from switching R’s linear algebra libraries

December 27, 2013
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The performance gains from switching R’s linear algebra libraries

What is often forgotten in the so-called data analysis "language wars” is that, across most of these languages, many common computations are performed using outsourced dynamically linked math libraries. For example, R; Python's Numpy; Julia; Matlab; and Mathematica all make heavy use of the BLAS linear algebra API. As a result, R can't be properly »more

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Julia is lightning fast: bubble sort revisited

December 26, 2013
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I had heard the name of the new technical computing language Julia buzzing around for some time already. Now during Christmas I had some time on my hands, and implemented the bubble sort algorithm that I have already posted about… See more ›

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Statistical evidence for revised standards

December 26, 2013
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In response to the discussion of X and me of his recent paper, Val Johnson writes: I would like to thank Andrew for forwarding his comments on uniformly most powerful Bayesian tests (UMPBTs) to me and his invitation to respond to them. I think he (and also Christian Robert) raise a number of interesting points […]The post Statistical evidence for revised standards appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and…

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MCMSki IV, Jan. 6-8, 2014, Chamonix (news #15)

December 26, 2013
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MCMSki IV, Jan. 6-8, 2014, Chamonix (news #15)

The programs of the talks, posters and workshop are now printed and available on Speaker Deck (talks, posters, workshop). Please let me know if you spot anything wrong (even though it will not be reprinted!). This is presumably the last news item till Jan. 5 as I am almost off to Chamonix for a week […]

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“Bad Arguments” (a book by Ali Almossawi)

December 26, 2013
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“Bad Arguments” (a book by Ali Almossawi)

I received a new book today as a present[i]: “(An illustrated book of) Bad Arguments” (Ali Almossawi 2013) [ii]. I wish I’d had it for the critical thinking class I just completed! Here’s the illustration it gives for “hasty generalization”. The author allows it to be accessed here, I just discovered. But it’s not just a clever book […]

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The Mascots of Bayesian Statistics

December 26, 2013
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The Mascots of Bayesian Statistics

Why would Bayesian statistics need a mascot/symbol/logo? Well, why not? I don’t know of any other branch of statistics that has a mascot but many programming languages have. R has an “R”, Python has a python snake, and Go has an adorable little...

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Measuring Beauty

December 25, 2013
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Measuring Beauty

I’ve come across a paper that was using “beauty” as one of the predictors. To measure beauty, the authors used Anaface.com I don’t trust metrics without trying them on a gold standard first. So, I tried how well Anaface does on something that the arts world considers as one of gold standards of beauty – […]The post Measuring Beauty appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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Spam!

December 25, 2013
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This one totally faked me out at first. It was an email from “Nick Bagnall” that began: Dear Dr. Gelman, I made contact last year regarding your work in the CMG: Reconstructing Climate from Tree Ring Data project. We are about to start producing the 2014 edition and I wanted to discuss this with you […]The post Spam! appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.

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Quandl the Data Engine

December 25, 2013
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Quandl the Data Engine

A while back, I wrote for some time on this blog about 'data engines' - search engines dedicated to online (statistical) data sets. These included BuzzData (now closed, transmogrified into LookBookHQ) datacollective.org Timetric Socrata Google Correlate Zanran DataMarket EidoSearch and...

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